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  1. Anthony King (2011). Functionalism and Structuralism. In Ian Jarvie Jesus Zamora Bonilla (ed.), The Sage Handbook of the Philosophy of Social Sciences. 429.
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  2. Anthony King (2007). The Sociology of Sociology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (4):501-524.
    In this recent history of British sociology, Andrew Halsey suggests an intriguing connection between political economic régimes in the twentieth century and the development of sociology as an academic discipline, dividing British sociology into four periods, 1900-1950, 1950-1967, 1968-1975, and 1975-2000. In this way, by connecting disciplinary developments with contemporaneous régimes of economic regulation, Halsey begins to outline a sociology of sociology. However, although much of Halsey's book is informative, especially his description of the period from 1950-1967 when he personally (...)
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  3. Anthony King (2007). Why I Am Not an Individualist. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (2):211–219.
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  4. Anthony King (2006). How Not to Structure a Social Theory: A Reply to a Critical Response. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (4):464-479.
    In his recent review of my book, The Structure of Social Theory , Karsten Stueber rejected my criticisms of contemporary social theory. Against my "hermeneutic" sociology which prioritizes human social relations, he advocates a return to a dualistic ontology of structure and agency. This reply addresses Stueber’s criticisms to re-affirm the ontology of social relations against ontological dualism. Key Words: structure • agency • hermeneutics • social relations.
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  5. Anthony King (2006). Review Essay: High-Heeled Red Imitation-Crocodile Boots: The Future of the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (3):367-378.
    The two works under review attempt to describe the outlines of a post-positivist social science of the future. Against objectivist approaches, these books emphasize the importance of hermeneutics and the cultural turn to the social sciences. Social sciences must recognize collective understandings and human agency. However, while affirming the importance of an interpretivist approach, both of these works also suggest that objective institutional reality must be recognized by social scientists today. Meaningful human agency and objective structure must be encompassed by (...)
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  6. Anthony King (2006). Serial Killing and the Postmodern Self. History of the Human Sciences 19 (3):109-125.
    The self has been a consistently central theme in philosophy and the social sciences and, in the last decades of the 20th century, the fragmentation of the modern self has engendered extensive academic commentary. In order to contribute to current discussions about self, it is perhaps most effective to map the transformation of a single representation of the self in contemporary culture. As a cultural ‘flashpoint’, the serial killer could provide an apposite analytical focus. Drawing critically on Mark Seltzer's work (...)
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  7. Anthony King (2005). The Habitus Process: A Sociological Conception. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 35 (4):463–468.
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  8. Anthony King (2004). Structure and Agency. In Austin Harrington (ed.), Modern Social Theory: An Introduction. Oup Oxford.
  9. Anthony King (2004). The Structure of Social Theory. Routledge.
    Over the last three decades, social theory has become an increasingly important sub-discipline within sociology. Social theory has attempted to elucidate the philosophical basis of sociology by defining the nature of social reality. According to social theory, society consists of objective institutions, structure, on the one hand, and individuals, agency on the other it promotes human social relations, insisting that in every instance social reality consists of these relations. The book begins by defining and criticizing contemporary social theory. It analyses (...)
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  10. Anthony King (2000). The Accidental Derogation of the Lay Actor: A Critique of Giddens's Concept of Structure. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (3):362-383.
  11. Anthony King (2000). Thinking with Bourdieu Against Bourdieu: A 'Practical' Critique of the Habitus. Sociological Theory 18 (3):417-433.
    There are two strands in Bourdieu's sociological writings. On the one hand, Bourdieu argues for a theoretical position one might term his "practical theory" which emphasizes virtuosic interactions between individuals. On the other hand, and most frequently, Bourdieu appeals to the concept of the habitus according to which society consists of objective structures and determined-and isolated-individuals. Although Bourdieu believes that the habitus is compatible with his practical theory and overcomes the impasse of objectivism and subjectivism in social theory, neither claim (...)
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  12. Anthony King (1999). Legitimating Post-Fordism: A Critique of Anthony Giddens' Later Works. Telos 1999 (115):61-77.
    Introduction Although Anthony Giddens describes his approach as “social” rather than “critical” theory, and although there is little obvious Frankfurt School influence in his writing, he believes “social theory is inevitably critical theory.”1 While he might aim at such a critical position, it is far from obvious that he succeeds. On the contrary, his later writings have become an apology for the status quo.2 Failing to consider his prejudices, perhaps because he thinks critique is inevitable, Giddens has increasingly vindicated predominant (...)
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  13. Anthony King (1999). The Impossibility of Naturalism: The Antinomies of Bhaskar's Realism. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 29 (3):267–288.
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  14. Anthony King (1998). A Critique of Baudrillard's Hyperreality: Towards a Sociology of Postmodernism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (6):47-66.
    Through the critical examination of Baudrillard's concept of hyperreality, this article seeks to make a wider contribution to contempor ary debates about postmodernism. It draws on a post-Cartesian, Heideg gerian philosophy to demonstrate the weakness of the concept of hyperreality and reveal its foundation in a Cartesian epistemology. The article goes on to claim that this same Heideggerian tradition suggests a way in which the concept of hyperreality and nihilistic postmodern sociologies more generally might be dialectically superseded. Instead of these (...)
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  15. Anthony King (1998). Baudrillard's Nihilism and the End of Theory. Telos 1998 (112):89-106.
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