Search results for 'Anthony Ross' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephanie Ross (1990). Anthony Savile, Aesthetic Reconstructions: The Seminal Writings of Lessing, Kant and Schiller Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (9):383-387.score: 360.0
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  2. Anthony Ross (2000). An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (2):280-281.score: 240.0
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  3. Anthony Ross (2014). Distance and Presence in Analogue and Digital Epistolary Networks. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 17 (2):201-226.score: 240.0
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  4. Anthony Clunies Ross (1999). Morality and the Market. In Alan Montefiore & David Vines (eds.), Integrity in the Public and Private Domains. Routledge.score: 240.0
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  5. Douglas Mesner & Colin A. Ross (2011). Letter to the Editor: A Dialogue Regarding Colin Ross' Article “The Electrophysiological Basis of Evil Eye Belief”. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):103-105.score: 180.0
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  6. Braxton Ross (1991). Bernhard Bischoff, Latin Palaeography: Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Trans. Dáibhí Ò Cróinín and David Ganz. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, in Association with the Medieval Academy of Ireland, 1990. Pp. Xi, 291; Black-and-White Plates, Figures. $59.50 (Cloth); $22.95 (Paper). First Published as Paläographie des Römischen Altertums Und des Abendländischen Mittelalters in 1979 by Erich Schmidt and Reviewed in Speculum 57 (1982), 118–21, by B. Ross. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (1):121-122.score: 180.0
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  7. Don Ross (2007). Game Theory as Mathematics for Biology: Evolutionary Dynamics and Extensive Form Games Ross Cressman Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003 (330 Pp; $48.00 Hbk; ISBN 0262033054); Moral Sentiments and Material Interests Herbert Gintis , Samuel Bowles , Robert Boyd and Ernst Fehr , Eds Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005 (416 Pp; $50.00 Hbk; ISBN 0262072521). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 2 (1):104-107.score: 180.0
  8. John Mitchell & James B. Ross (1968). An Interview with James B. Ross. Bioscience 18 (8):779-781.score: 180.0
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  9. Don Ross (2006). Evolutionary Game Theory and the Normative Theory of Institutional Design: Binmore and Behavioral Economics. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (1):51-79.score: 60.0
    In this article, I critically respond to Herbert Gintis's criticisms of the behavioral-economic foundations of Ken Binmore's game-theoretic theory of justice. Gintis, I argue, fails to take full account of the normative requirements Binmore sets for his account, and also ignores what I call the ‘scale-relativity’ considerations built into Binmore's approach to modeling human evolution. Paul Seabright's criticism of Binmore, I note, repeats these oversights. In the course of answering Gintis's and Seabright's objections, I clarify and (...)
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  10. Don Ross (2008). Ontic Structural Realism and Economics. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):732-743.score: 60.0
    Ontic structural realism (OSR) is crucially motivated by empirical discoveries of fundamental physics. To this extent its potential to furnish a general metaphysics for science may appear limited. However, OSR also provides a good account of the progress that has been achieved over the decades in a formalized special science, economics. Furthermore, this has a basis in the ontology presupposed by economic theory, and is not just an artifact of formalization. †To contact the author, please write to: 4th Floor, Humanities (...)
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  11. Don Ross (2008). Classical Game Theory, Socialization and the Rationalization of Conventions. Topoi 27 (1-2):57-72.score: 60.0
    The paper begins by providing a game-theoretic reconstruction of Gilbert’s (1989) philosophical critique of Lewis (1969) on the role of salience in selecting conventions. Gilbert’s insight is reformulated thus: Nash equilibrium is insufficiently powerful as a solution concept to rationalize conventions for unboundedly rational agents if conventions are solutions to the kinds of games Lewis supposes. Both refinements to NE and appeals to bounded rationality can plug this gap, but lack generality. As Binmore (this issue) argues, evolutive game theory readily (...)
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  12. Alison Ross (2000). Introduction to Monique David-Ménard on Kant and Madness. Hypatia 15 (4):77-81.score: 60.0
    : Ross examines the relation between thought and madness within the practical and theoretical wings of Kant's critical philosophy. She argues that the notion of critique is formulated as a guard against the tendency of thought to madness. She locates the significance of David-Ménard's essay on Kant's pre-critical works in the idea that Kant's own tendency to madness functions in these early works as a motivational principle for the mature, critical system.
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  13. Don Ross, Integrating the Dynamics of Multi-Level Economic Agency.score: 60.0
    Three recent book-length studies in the philosophy of economics (Mirowski 2002, Davis 2003, Ross 2005) have drawn attention to the fact that mainstream economic theory has consistently avoided commitment to any particular model of the person. This is the most significant respect in which economics has kept aloof from part of psychology. The widespread belief, on the other hand, that economists’ attentiveness to the psychology of choice and decision had to wait for the Allais challenge and then for Kahneman (...)
     
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  14. Anthony Skelton (2013). Ross, William David. In James Crimmins (ed.), Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Utilitarianism. Bloomsbury Academic.score: 54.0
    A short encyclopedia article devoted to W. D. Ross.
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  15. Anthony Skelton (2010/2012). William David Ross. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 42.0
    Presents and argues for a novel interpretation of Ross's distinctive contribution to moral theory and meta-ethics.
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  16. Anthony Arblaster (1995). Ross Harrison, Democracy, Routledge, London, 1993, Pp. 304. Utilitas 7 (02):343-.score: 36.0
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  17. Thomas W. Smythe & Thomas G. Evans (2007). Intuition as a Basic Source of Moral Knowledge. Philosophia 35 (2):233-247.score: 24.0
    The idea that intuition plays a basic role in moral knowledge and moral philosophy probably began in the eighteenth century. British philosophers such as Anthony Shaftsbury, Francis Hutcheson, Thomas Reid, and later David Hume talk about a “moral sense” that they place in John Locke’s theory of knowledge in terms of Lockean reflexive perceptions, while Richard Price seeks a faculty by which we obtain our ideas of right and wrong. (...)
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  18. S. R. Benatar & Gillian Brock (eds.) (2011). Global Health and Global Health Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction; Part I. Global Health, Definitions and Descriptions: 1. What is global health? Solly Benatar and Ross Upshur; 2. The state of global health in a radically unequal world: patterns and prospects Ron Labonte and Ted Schrecker; 3. Addressing the societal determinants of health: the key global health ethics imperative of our times Anne-Emmanuelle Birn; 4. Gender and global health: inequality and differences Lesley Doyal and Sarah Payne; 5. Heath systems and health Martin McKee; (...)
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  19. Charles Sayward (1988). W.D. Ross on Acting From Motives. Journal of Value Inquiry 22 (4):299-306.score: 24.0
    This paper defends a position held by W, D, Ross that it is no part of one’s duty to have a certain motive since one cannot by choice have it here and now.
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  20. Brian Weatherson (2013). Ross on Sleeping Beauty. Philosophical Studies 163 (2):503-512.score: 24.0
    In two excellent recent papers, Jacob Ross has argued that the standard arguments for the ‘thirder’ answer to the Sleeping Beauty puzzle lead to violations of countable additivity. The problem is that most arguments for that answer generalise in awkward ways when he looks at the whole class of what he calls Sleeping Beauty problems. In this note I develop a new argument for the thirder answer that doesn't generalise in this way.
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  21. Anthony Arak, William Ross Ashby, Francis Maler Bacon, Roger Bakeman, George Berkeley, Ned Block, Wolfgang Bonsiepen, Egon Brunswik, Josep Call & Donald Campbell (2011). Pers onenregister. In Wolfgang Welsch, Christian Tewes & Klaus Vieweg (eds.), Natur Und Geist: Über Ihre Evolutionäre Verhältnisbestimmung. Akademie Verlag.score: 24.0
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  22. Mihaela Frunza (2010). Kwame Anthony Appiah, Cosmopolitism. Etica într-o lume a strainilor/ Cosmopolitanism. Ethics in a World of Strangers. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):249-252.score: 24.0
    KWAME ANTHONY APPIAH, COSMOPOLITISM. ETICA ÎNTR-O LUME A STRĂINILOR COSMOPOLITANISM. ETHICS IN A WORLD OF STRANGERS, BUCUREŞTI: ANDRECO EDUCATIONAL GRUP, 2007.
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  23. Nancy G. Slack (2003). Are Research Schools Necessary? Contrasting Models of 20th Century Research at Yale Led by Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford and G. Evelyn Hutchinson. Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):501 - 529.score: 24.0
    This paper compares and contrasts three groups that conducted biological research at Yale University during overlapping periods between 1910 and 1970. Yale University proved important as a site for this research. The leaders of these groups were Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford, and G. Evelyn Hutchinson, and their members included both graduate students and more experienced scientists. All produced innovative research, including the opening of new subfields in embryology, endocrinology and ecology respectively, over a long period of time. (...)
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  24. Anthony Savile (2002). Aesthetic Experience in Shaftesbury: Anthony Savile. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):55–74.score: 21.0
    [Richard Glauser] Shaftesbury's theory of aesthetic experience is based on his conception of a natural disposition to apprehend beauty, a real 'form' of things. I examine the implications of the disposition's naturalness. I argue that the disposition is not an extra faculty or a sixth sense, and attempt to situate Shaftesbury's position on this issue between those of Locke and Hutcheson. I argue that the natural disposition is to be perfected in many different ways in order to be exercised in (...)
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  25. Anthony King (1999). Legitimating Post-Fordism: A Critique of Anthony Giddens' Later Works. Telos 1999 (115):61-77.score: 21.0
    Introduction Although Anthony Giddens describes his approach as “social” rather than “critical” theory, and although there is little obvious Frankfurt School influence in his writing, he believes “social theory is inevitably critical theory.”1 While he might aim at such a critical position, it is far from obvious that he succeeds. On the contrary, his later writings have become an apology for the status quo.2 Failing to consider his prejudices, perhaps because he thinks critique is inevitable, Giddens has increasingly vindicated (...)
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  26. Marco Barducci (2011). Hugo Grotius and the English Republic: The Writings of Anthony Ascham, 1648-1650. Grotiana 32 (1):40-63.score: 21.0
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  27. Anthony C. Thiselton (2006). Thiselton on Hermeneutics: The Collected Works and New Essays of Anthony Thiselton. William B. Eerdmans Pub..score: 21.0
    Graham N. Stanton, University of Cambridge ?Anthony Thiselton is one of our leading theologians, equally at home in both New Testament studies and in philosophical and theological hermeneutics, and a collection of this major articles will ...
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  28. Samuel Cohn (2006). Anthony F. D'Elia, The Renaissance of Marriage in Fifteenth-Century Italy. (Harvard Historical Studies, 146.) Cambridge, Mass., and London: Harvard University Press, 2004. Pp. Xi, 262. $49.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (1):169-170.score: 21.0
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  29. Mikael Janvid (2013). Anthony Brueckner Essays on Skepticism. Oxford University Press, 2010. Xi + 396 Pp. Isbn 978‐0‐19‐958586‐1. [REVIEW] Theoria 79 (4):378-382.score: 21.0
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  30. Caroline Kraus Luvizotto (2013). A Racionalização das Tradições na Modernidade: o Diálogo Entre Anthony Giddens e Jürgen Habermas. Trans/Form/Ação 36 (1):245-258.score: 21.0
    Partindo das reflexões de Habermas e sua concepção de modernidade, compreendida como um projeto inacabado, Giddens salienta que, em todas as sociedades, a manutenção da identidade pessoal e sua conexão com identidades sociais mais amplas é um requisito primordial para a segurança ontológica. Para alcançar a segurança ontológica, a modernidade teve que (re)inventar tradições e se afastar de "tradições genuínas", isto é, aqueles valores radicalmente vinculados ao passado pré moderno. Este é um caráter de descontinuidade da modernidade - a separação (...)
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  31. Samuel Clarke & Anthony Collins (2011). The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-08. Broadview Press.score: 21.0
    An important work in the debate between materialists and dualists, the public correspondence between Anthony Collins and Samuel Clarke provided the framework for arguments over consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century Britain. In Clarke's view, mind and consciousness are so unified that they cannot be compounded into wholes or divided into parts, so mind and consciousness must be distinct from matter. Collins, by contrast, was a perceptive advocate of a materialist account of mind, who defended the possibility that thinking (...)
     
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  32. Cian Dorr (2010). Review of James Ladyman and Don Ross, Every Thing Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).score: 18.0
    Ladyman, Ross and their collaborators (Spurrett is a co-author of two chapters, Collier of one) begin their book with a ferocious attack on "analytic metaphysics", as it is currently practiced. Their opening blast claims that contemporary analytic metaphysics 'contributes nothing to human knowledge': its practitioners are 'wasting their talents', and the whole enterprise, although 'engaged in by some extremely intelligent and morally serious people, fails to qualify as part of the enlightened pursuit of objective truth, and should be discontinued' (...)
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  33. Thomas L. Carson (2005). Ross and Utilitarianism on Promise Keeping and Lying: Self‐Evidence and the Data of Ethics. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):140–157.score: 18.0
    An important test of any moral theory is whether it can give a satisfactory account of moral prohibitions such as those against promise breaking and lying. Act-utilitarianism (hereafter utilitarianism) implies that any act can be justified if it results in the best consequences. Utilitarianism implies that it is sometimes morally right to break promises and tell lies. Few people find this result to be counterintuitive and very few are persuaded by Kant’s arguments that attempt to show that lying is always (...)
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  34. Thomas Hurka, On Audi's Marriage of Ross and Kant.score: 18.0
    As its title suggests, Robert Audi’s The Good in the Right1 defends an intuitionist moral view like W.D. Ross’s in The Right and the Good. Ross was an intuitionist, first, in metaethics, where he held that there are self-evident moral truths that can be known by intuition. But he was also an intuitionist in the different sense used in normative ethics, since he held that there are irreducibly many such truths. Some concern the intrinsic goods, which are in (...)
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  35. David Wiggins (1998). The Right and the Good and WD Ross's Criticism of Consequentialism. Utilitas 10 (3):261-.score: 18.0
    David Ross made the first sustained attack on Moore's agathistic utilitarianism or ethical neutralism a damaging concession to consequentialism.
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  36. Edward Feser (2013). Kripke, Ross, and the Immaterial Aspects of Thought. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):1-32.score: 18.0
    James Ross developed a simple and powerful argument for the immateriality of the intellect, an argument rooted in the Aristotelian-Scholastic tradition while drawing on ideas from analytic philosophers Saul Kripke, W. V. Quine, and Nelson Goodman. This paper provides a detailed exposition and defense of the argument, filling out aspects that Ross left sketchy. In particular, it elucidates the argument’s relationship to its Aristotelian-Scholastic and analytic antecedents, and to Kripke’s work especially; and it responds to objections or potential (...)
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  37. Anthony John Patrick Kenny (1971). A Reply by Anthony Kenny. Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (4):497-498.score: 18.0
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  38. Brad Hooker (1996). Ross-Style Pluralism Versus Rule-Consequentialism. Mind 105 (420):531-552.score: 18.0
    This paper employs (and defends where needed) a familiar four-part methodology for assessing moral theories. This methodology makes the most popular kind of moral pluralism--here called Ross-style pluralism--look extremely attractive. The paper contends, however, that, if rule-consequentialism's implications match our considered moral convictions as well as Ross-style pluralism's implications do, the methodology makes rule-consequentialism look even more attractive than Ross-style pluralism. The paper then attacks two arguments recently put forward in defence of Ross-style pluralism. One of (...)
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  39. H. H. Jack (1971). Utilitarianism and Ross's Theory of Prima Facie Duties. Dialogue 10 (03):437-456.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that ross's theory is an unsatisfactory compromise between moore's ideal utilitarianism and prichard's intuitionism. by including an 'optimific' principle, ross is exposed like moore to such difficulties as having to grant that we never know our duty and that logically we have a duty to pursue our own pleasure. in addition, this paper attributes to moore's influence ross's very inadequate treatment of justice; difficulties in his basic distinction of prima facie versus actual duties; and (...)
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  40. H. J. McCloskey (1963). Ross and the Concept of a Prima Facie Duty. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):336 – 345.score: 18.0
    The concept of prima facie duty is deemed important by ross and the author. The author thinks ross and others have not elucidated the concept and the relation between prima facie and 'absolute' duty. He concludes that "we must explain the obligatoriness of absolute duties in terms of prima facie duties, As being derived from them, And not vice versa, As ross attempted." (staff).
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  41. Charles T. Wolfe (2007). “Determinism/Spinozism in the Radical Enlightenment: The Cases of Anthony Collins and Denis Diderot”. International Review of Eighteenth-Century Studies 1 (1):37-51.score: 18.0
    In his Philosophical Inquiry concerning Human Liberty (1717), the English deist Anthony Collins proposed a complete determinist account of the human mind and action, partly inspired by his mentor Locke, but also by elements from Bayle, Leibniz and other Continental sources. It is a determinism which does not neglect the question of the specific status of the mind but rather seeks to provide a causal account of mental activity and volition in particular; it is a ‘volitional determinism’. Some decades (...)
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  42. Francesco Orsi (2012). David Ross, Ideal Utilitarianism, and the Intrinsic Value of Acts. Journal for the History of Analytic Philosophy 1 (2).score: 18.0
    The denial of the intrinsic value of acts apart from both motives and consequences lies at the heart of Ross’s deontology and his opposition to ideal utilitarianism. Moreover, the claim that acts can have intrinsic value is a staple element of early and contemporary attempts to “consequentialise” all of morality. I first show why Ross’s denial is relevant both for his philosophy and for current debates. Then I consider and reject as inconclusive some of Ross’s explicit and (...)
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  43. Liane Young & Rebecca Saxe (2010). It's Not Just What You Do, but What's on Your Mind: A Review of Kwame Anthony Appiah's “Experiments in Ethics”. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 3 (3):201-207.score: 18.0
    What is the impact of science on philosophy? In “Experiments in Ethics”, Kwame Anthony Appiah addresses this question for morality and ethics. Appiah suggests that scientific results may undermine moral intuitions by undermining our confidence in the actual sources of our intuitions, or by invalidating our factual assumptions about the causes of human behavior. Appiah worries that scientific results showing situational causes on human behavior force us to abandon the intuition, formalized in virtue ethics, that what matters is “who (...)
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  44. Paul Guyer (2008). Humean Critics, Imaginative Fluency, and Emotional Responsiveness: A Follow-Up to Stephanie Ross. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (4):445-456.score: 18.0
    In ‘Humean Critics: Real or Ideal?’ (BJA 48 (2008): 20-28), Stephanie Ross argues that four of Hume's five criteria for qualified critics in “Of the Standard of Taste’, namely practise, comparison, freedom from prejudice, and good sense, should be understood as conditions for improving the basic constituent of taste, namely delicacy of perception, in real critics whose judgments can be canonical or guiding for the rest of us, but that delicacy of perception needs to be supplemented by what she (...)
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  45. Christopher Meyers (2003). Appreciating W. D. Ross:On Duties and Consequences. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (2):81 – 97.score: 18.0
    In this article I describe the theoretical underpinnings of 20th-century British philosopher W. D. Ross's approach to linking deontological and teleological decision making. I attempt to fill in what Ross left on the whole unanswered, that is, how to use his duties to resolve dilemmas. A case study in journalism demonstrates how to apply the theory. I conclude with an analysis of what I take to be the strengths and weaknesses in Ross's theory.
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  46. Jonathan Cohen (2001). Subjectivism, Physicalism or None of the Above? Comments on Ross's The Location Problem for Color Subjectivism. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):94-104.score: 18.0
    In “The Location Problem for Color Subjectivism,” Peter Ross argues against what he calls subjectivism — the view that “colors are not describable in physical terms, ... [but are] mental processes or events of visual states” (2),1 and in favor of physicalism — a view according to which colors are “physical properties of physical objects, such as reflectance properties” (10). He rejects an argument that has been offered in support of subjectivism, and argues that, since no form of subjectivism (...)
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  47. William Uzgalis (2009). Anthony Collins on the Emergence of Consciousness and Personal Identity. Philosophy Compass 4 (2):363-379.score: 18.0
    The correspondence between Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins of 1706–8, while not well known, is a spectacularly good debate between a dualist and a materialist over the possibility of giving a materialist account of consciousness and personal identity. This article puts the Clarke Collins Correspondence in a broader context in which it can be better appreciated, noting that it is really a debate between John Locke and Anthony Collins on one hand, and Samuel Clarke and Joseph Butler on (...)
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  48. Dan Demetriou (2013). The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen, by Kwame Anthony Appiah. Mind 122 (486):fzt064.score: 18.0
    Honor has been in disrepute among intellectuals for almost a century now. The standard explanation for honor’s demise is its role in driving young men and their countries to surpass the limits of acceptable human slaughter in the First World War, the trenches of which became ‘a mass grave for honor’ (Welsh 2008: x). Academic interest in honor revived in the 1950s among anthropologists and sociologists, where it was treated with a studied moral distance. Literary scholars, historians, and political scientists (...)
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  49. Jonathan Dancy (1998). Wiggins and Ross. Utilitas 10 (3):281-285.score: 18.0
    Ross's attempt to undermine the consequentialist understanding of the relation between duties and outcomes might give him greater defence against the danger that outcome-related duties will come to constitute a norm, to the disadvantage of all others.
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  50. Christopher Meyers (2011). Reappreciating W. D. Ross: Naturalizing Prima Facie Duties and a Proposed Method. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (4):316-331.score: 18.0
    The goal of this article is to try to resolve two key problems in the duty-based approach of W. D. Ross: the source of principles and a process for moving from prima facie to actual duty. I use a naturalistic explanation for the former and a nine-step method for making concrete ethical decisions as they could be applied to journalism. Consistent with Ross's position, the process is complicated, particularly in tougher problems, and it cannot guarantee correct choices. Again (...)
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