Search results for 'Anthropological ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Axel Honneth (2009). Problems of Ethical Pluralism: Arnold Gehlen's Anthropological Ethics. Iris 1 (1):187-194.score: 156.0
    In this article the challenge of a pluralist ethics presented by Arnold Gehlen in his book Moral und Hypermoral [Morality and Hypermorality] is examined by attempting to find out what might still be worth preserving after Jürgen Habermas’s critical objections to the text in his “Arnold Gehlen: Imitation Substantiality” (1970). To this end the basic assumptions of Gehlen’s pluralist ethics are briefly presented (1), before going on to summarizing Habermas’s central, and largely convincing, objections to this ethics (...)
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  2. E. Whittaker (1981). Anthropological Ethics, Fieldwork and Epistemological Disjunctures. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 11 (4):437-451.score: 150.0
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  3. K. Vonfritz (1980). Aristotle Anthropological Ethics. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 87 (2):242-257.score: 150.0
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  4. Patricia Caplan (ed.) (2003). The Ethics of Anthropology: Debates and Dilemmas. Routledge.score: 144.0
    Since the inception of their discipline, anthropologists have studied virtually every conceivable aspect of other peoples' morality - religion, social control, sin, virtue, evil, duty, purity and pollution. But what of the examination of anthropology itself, and of its agendas, epistemes, theories and praxes? Conceived as a response to Patrick Tierney's hugely inflammatory book Darkness in El Dorado , whose allegations of immoral and negligent anthropological research in South America caused a storm of protest and debate, the book combines (...)
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  5. Nigel Biggar (2013). Evolutionary Biology, 'Enlightened' Anthropological Narratives, and Social Morality: A View From Christian Ethics. Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (2):152-157.score: 138.0
    The natural evolution of ethics is commonly understood in terms of the development from the selfish struggle to survive, via prudent cooperation, to altruism. However, cooperation that is prudent in the sense of serving basically selfish interests is not really altruistic. Besides, Christian ethics should not identify morality with absolutely disinterested altruism. Self-interest is only selfish when it is disproportionate or unfair; otherwise it is morally legitimate. Therefore the natural evolution of ethics is better understood as the (...)
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  6. Marilyn Strathern (ed.) (2000). Audit Cultures: Anthropological Studies in Accountability, Ethics, and the Academy. Routledge.score: 136.0
    If cultures are always in the making, this book catches one kind of culture on the make. Academics will be familiar with audit in the form of research and teaching assessments - they may not be aware how pervasive practices of 'accountability' are or of the diversity of political regimes under which they flourish. Twelve social anthropologists from across Europe and the Commonwealth chart an influential and controversial cultural phenomenon.
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  7. Robert Lyman Potter (2001). In the Face of Suffering: The Philosophical- Anthropological Foundations of Clinical Ethics, by Jos V. M. Welie. Omaha, Nebr.: Creighton University Press, 1998. 293 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):115-116.score: 132.0
    This book is for those searching for an ethics engine with enough philosophical power to drive healthcare reform toward a balance between medical technology and human compassion. Jos Welie's project is to This is an important goal that has eluded others. Jos Welie has more nearly succeeded in this book than any other author who has come to my attention.
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  8. Stephen Nugent (2003). Anthropological Discourse and Ethics. In Patricia Caplan (ed.), The Ethics of Anthropology: Debates and Dilemmas. Routledge. 77.score: 132.0
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  9. Jan van Baal (1981). Man's Quest for Partnership: The Anthropological Foundations of Ethics and Religion. Van Gorcum.score: 132.0
     
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  10. Joel S. Kahn (2005). Anthropology's Malaysian Interlocutors : Toward a Cosmopolitan Ethics of Anthropological Practice. In Lynn Meskell & Peter Pels (eds.), Embedding Ethics. Berg. 101.score: 126.0
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  11. Pradeep Jeganathan (2005). Pain, Politics, and the Epistemological Ethics of Anthropological Disciplinarity. In Lynn Meskell & Peter Pels (eds.), Embedding Ethics. Berg.score: 126.0
  12. S. Kaiser (2002). Ruth M. Krulfeld and Jeffery L. Macdonald (Eds), Power, Ethics, and Human Rights: Anthropological Studies of Refugee Research and Action. [REVIEW] Ethics Place and Environment 5:88-90.score: 126.0
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  13. Arthur Kleinman (2006). Ethics and Experience: An Anthropological Approach to Health Equity. In Sudhir Anand, Fabienne Peter & Amartya Sen (eds.), Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. Oup Oxford.score: 126.0
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  14. Richard J. Chacon & Ruben G. Mendoza (eds.) (2012). The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research: Reporting on Environmental Degradation and Warfare. Springer.score: 122.0
    This work documents the ethical dilemmas faced by anthropologists and researchers in general when investigating Amerindian communities.
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  15. Myriam Gerhard (2009). Maio G, Clausen J, Müller O (Eds) Human Without Measure? Scope and Limits of Anthropological Arguments in Biomedical Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (5):571-573.score: 122.0
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  16. Alberto Corsín Jiménez (ed.) (2008). Culture and Well-Being: Anthropological Approaches to Freedom and Political Ethics. Pluto Press.score: 122.0
    The concept of well-being has emerged as a key category of social and political thought, especially in the fields of moral and political philosophy, development studies, and economics. This book takes a critical look at the notion of well-being by examining what well-being means, or could mean, to people living in a number of different regions including Sudan, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, India, Sierra Leone, and the UK. The contributors take issue with some of the assumptions behind Western concepts of (...)
     
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  17. Heidi Armbruster & Anna Lærke (eds.) (2008). Taking Sides: Ethics, Politics, and Fieldwork in Anthropology. Berghahn Books.score: 120.0
    This volume, written by a new generation of scholars engaged with contemporary global movements for social justice and peace, reflects their efforts in trying ...
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  18. Stanley R. Barrett (1984). Racism, Ethics and the Subversive Nature of Anthropological Inquiry. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (1):1-25.score: 120.0
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  19. Michael Lambek (ed.) (2011). Ordinary Ethics: Anthropology, Language, and Action. Fordham University Press.score: 120.0
    Bringing together ethnographic exposition with philosophical concepts and arguments and effectively transcending subdisciplinary boundaries between cultural and ...
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  20. Francisco M. Salzano & A. Magdalena Hurtado (eds.) (2004). Lost Paradises and the Ethics of Research and Publication. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    In 2000, the world of anthropology was rocked by a high-profile debate over the fieldwork performed by two prominent anthropologists, Napoleon Chagnon and James V. Neel, among the Yanamamo tribe of South America. The controversy was fueled by the publication of Patrick Tierney's incendiary Darkness in El Dorado which accused Chagnon of not only misinterpreting but actually inciting some of the violence he perceived among these "fierce people". Tierney also pointed the finger at Neel as the unwitting agent of a (...)
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  21. Bronislaw Malinowski (1936/1977). The Foundations of Faith and Morals: An Anthropological Analysis of Primitive Beliefs and Conduct with Special Reference to the Fundamental Problems of Religion and Ethics: Delivered Before the University of Durham at Armstrong College, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, February 1935. Norwood Editions.score: 120.0
     
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  22. Kliegel Matthias (2000). Does the Brain Make the Person? Anthropological Remarks on the Ethics of Human Brain Research: A Theologian's Perspective. Ethik in der Medizin 12 (2).score: 120.0
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  23. Michael A. Rynkiewich & James P. Spradley (eds.) (1976/1981). Ethics and Anthropology: Dilemmas in Fieldwork. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..score: 120.0
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  24. Eric Wakin (1992). Anthropology Goes to War: Professional Ethics & Counterinsurgency in Thailand. University of Wisconsin, Center for Southeast Asian Studies.score: 120.0
     
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  25. Benedetta Giovanola (2009). Re-Thinking the Anthropological and Ethical Foundation of Economics and Business: Human Richness and Capabilities Enhancement. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):431 - 444.score: 114.0
    This article aims at showing the need for a sound ethical and anthropological foundation of economics and business, and argues the importance of a correct understanding of human values and human nature for the sake of economics and of businesses themselves. It is suggested that the ethical-anthropological side of economics and business can be grasped by taking Aristotle’s virtue ethics and Amartya Sen’s capability approach (CA) as major reference points. We hold that an “Aristotelian economics of virtues”, (...)
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  26. Lynn Meskell & Peter Pels (eds.) (2005). Embedding Ethics. Berg.score: 102.0
    Embedding Ethics questions why ethics have been divorced from scientific expertise. Invoking different disciplinary practices from biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology, contributors show how ethics should be resituated at the heart of, rather than exterior to, scientific activity. Positioning the researcher as a negotiator of significant truths rather than an adjudicator of a priori precepts enables contributors to relocate ethics in new sets of social and scientific relationships triggered by recent globalization processes--from new forms of (...)
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  27. Wim Dekkers (1999). The Lived Body as Aesthetic Object in Anthropological Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):117-128.score: 102.0
    Medicine does not usually consider the human body from an aesthetic point of view. This article explores the notion of the lived body as aesthetic object in anthropological medicine, concentrating on the views of Buytendijk and Straus on human uprightness and gracefulness. It is argued that their insights constitute a counter-balance to the way the human body is predominantly approached in medicine and medical ethics. In particular, (1) the relationship between anthropological, aesthetic and ethical norms, (2) the (...)
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  28. Michael M. J. Fischer (2003). Emergent Forms of Life and the Anthropological Voice. Duke University Press.score: 96.0
    Now, in Emergent Forms of Life and the Anthropological Voice, path-breaking scholar Michael M. J. Fischer moves the discussion to a consideration of the ...
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  29. Thomas A. Lewis (2010). Ethnography, Anthropology, and Comparative Religious Ethics: Or Ethnography and the Comparative Religious Ethics Local. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):395-403.score: 94.0
    Recent ethnographic studies of lived ethics, such as those of Leela Prasad and Saba Mahmood, present valuable opportunities for comparative religious ethics. This essay argues that developments in philosophical and religious ethics over the last three decades have supported a strong interest in thick descriptions of what it means to be human. This anthropological turn has thereby laid important groundwork for the encounter between these scholars and new ethnographic studies. Nonetheless, an encounter it is. Each side (...)
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  30. Mark Goodale (ed.) (2009). Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 90.0
    This volume synthesizes these different approaches and demonstrates how anthropologists have engaged with human rights as committed activists, empirical ...
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  31. Kam Ming Wong (2008). From Eschatology to Anthropology: The Development of Pannenberg's Thought Over Christian Ethics. Studies in Christian Ethics 21 (3):382-402.score: 90.0
    The anthropological turn, which Pannenberg decisively and successfully executed in the early 1980s, has provided his latest ethical argumentation with an extra dimension and increased depth. Pannenberg now believes that ethics has its foundations in anthropology rather than directly in dogmatics. The ethical as a common concern of all humankind must not be isolated and made independent of metaphysics and religion. For only then can the claim of universal validity for ethics be sustained, which in turn Pannenberg (...)
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  32. Alessandro Vescovi (forthcoming). Fear and Ethics in the Sundarbans. Anthropology in Amitav Ghosh's "The Hungry Tide". Governare la Paura. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies.score: 88.0
    Amitav Ghosh's The Hungry Tide has been often interpreted from the point of view of postcolonial studies and environmental studies, overlooking the anthropological implications of the narrative. This paper investigates the worship and the myth of the sylvan deity Bonbibi, and of her counterpart, the demon Dakshin Rai. The goddess, endowed with an apotropaic function, protects the people who “do the forest” from the dangers of the wilderness, epitomized by (but not limited to) tigers. According to anthropologist Annu Jalais, (...)
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  33. Georgia Apostolopoulou (2008). The Priority of Philosophical Anthropology Towards Ethics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:9-15.score: 84.0
    Philosophical anthropology, as Helmuth Plessner has explored it, vindicates its relative priority towards ethics, because it can set out the anthropological prerequisites for considering the moral subject as the embodied person. This claim, however, is still an open question. Walter Schulz has argued that the prevalence of science in contemporary life brings ethics to the fore and forces philosophical anthropology to an auxiliary exploration of ‘leading figures of thehuman’. Jürgen Habermas endorses Plessner’s exploration of the issue of (...)
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  34. Somogy Varga (2011). Habermas' 'Species Ethics', and the Limits of 'Formal Anthropology'. Critical Horizons 12 (1):71-89.score: 84.0
    This article seeks to defend two claims: Firstly, that Universalist ethics in Habermas and Rawls cannot function without some recourse to the Good Life, or human well-being. Secondly, that such ethical reflection must involve formal anthropological considerations. In other words, it must involve a consideration of the Good that also encompasses reflection on what we are as humans. As an example, the paper draws on Habermas’ recent thoughts on ‘species-ethics’. I will argue that 'species ethics' needs (...)
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  35. Klaus Hoeyer (2006). Ethics Wars”: Reflections on the Antagonism Between Bioethicists and Social Science Observers of Biomedicine. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):203 - 227.score: 82.0
    Social scientists often lament the fact that philosophically trained ethicists pay limited attention to the insights they generate. This paper presents an overview of tendencies in sociological and anthropological studies of morality, ethics and bioethics, and suggests that a lack in philosophical interest might be related to a tendency among social scientists to employ either a deficit model (social science perspectives accommodate the sense of context that philosophical ethics lacks), a replacement model (social scientists have finally found (...)
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  36. Henri Mbulu (2013). On the Anthropological Foundation of Bioethics: A Critique of the Work of J.-F. Malherbe. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (5):409-431.score: 78.0
    In this article, I critically analyze the anthropological foundation of the bioethics of philosopher Jean-François Malherbe, particularly as presented in his book, Pour une Éthique de la Médecine. Malherbe argues that such practices as organ donation and transplants, assisted reproduction, resuscitation, and other uses of biotechnologies in contemporary medicine are unethical because they go against essential human nature. Furthermore, he uses this position as a basis to prescribe public policy and institutional practice. In contrast, I argue not only that (...)
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  37. Jeremy MacClancy (ed.) (2002). Exotic No More: Anthropology on the Front Lines. University of Chicago Press.score: 76.0
    Since its founding in the nineteenth century, social anthropology has been seen as the study of exotic peoples in faraway places. But today more and more anthropologists are dedicating themselves not just to observing but to understanding and helping solve social problems wherever they occur--in international aid organizations, British TV studios, American hospitals, or racist enclaves in Eastern Europe, for example. In Exotic No More , an initiative of the Royal Anthropological Institute, some of today's most respected anthropologists demonstrate, (...)
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  38. Richard Price (2011). From The Teachings of Don Juan to Travels with Tooy: One Anthropologist's Trip. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):136-158.score: 74.0
    This article was presented as the Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness Distinguished Lecture, 19 November 2010, New Orleans. It highlights four decades of changes in the anthropology of consciousness, US society, and the author's views of “religion.” It also interrogates the shifting ethics of writing about friends (or about anyone else) and the special responsibilities of ethnographers. It ends with a consideration of the challenge of writing about people in possession, a special case of the problematic representation of (...)
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  39. Antonio Argandoña (2008). Integrating Ethics Into Action Theory and Organizational Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):435 - 446.score: 72.0
    A serious attempt to integrate ethics in management was done by Professor Juan Antonio Pérez López (1934–1996). His thought represents a break with current scholarly thinking on these subjects. The purpose of this article is to explain some of the most significant aspects of his theories, relating basically to his recourse to ethics as what defines the characteristic behavior of human beings, considered as individuals and as members of organizations. Pérez López used the anthropological conception underlying the (...)
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  40. Chong Ju Choi, Tarek Ibrahim Eldomiaty & Sae Won Kim (2007). Consumer Trust, Social Marketing and Ethics of Welfare Exchange. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):17 - 23.score: 72.0
    The global corporate scandals such as Enron, Worldcom and Global Crossing have raised fundamental issues of business ethics as well as economic, social and anthropological questions concerning the nature of business competition and global capitalism. The purpose of this conceptual paper is to introduce the concept of "welfare exchange" to the existing notions of economic, social and anthropological notions of business and exchange in markets and society in the 21st century. Global competition and business success in the (...)
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  41. May M. Edel (1968/2000). Anthropology & Ethics: The Quest for Moral Understanding. Transaction Publishers.score: 68.0
    This book presents the results of an experiment in interdisciplinary collaboration to clarify theories of morality and anthropology and philosophy, showing how ...
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  42. Anna Peterson (2000). In and of the World? Christian Theological Anthropology and Environmental Ethics. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (3):237-261.score: 66.0
    Mainstream currents within Christianity havelong insisted that humans, among all creatures, areneither fully identified with their physical bodiesnor fully at home on earth. This essay outlines theparticular characteristics of Christian notions ofhuman nature and the implications of this separationfor environmental ethics. It then examines recentefforts to correct some damaging aspects oftraditional Christian understandings of humanity''splace in nature, especially the notions of physicalembodiment and human embeddedment in earth. Theprimary goal of the essay is not to offer acomprehensive evaluation of Christian (...)
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  43. Arianna Ferrari, Christopher Coenen & Armin Grunwald (2012). Visions and Ethics in Current Discourse on Human Enhancement. NanoEthics 6 (3):215-229.score: 66.0
    Since it is now broadly acknowledged that ethics should receive early consideration in discourse on emerging technologies, ethical debates tend to flourish even while new fields of technology are still in their infancy. Such debates often liberally mix existing applications with technologies in the pipeline and far-reaching visions. This paper analyses the problems associated with this use of ethics as “preparatory” research, taking discourse on human enhancement in general and on pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement in particular as an example. (...)
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  44. Hubert Doucet (2007). Anthropological Challenges Raised by Neuroscience: Some Ethical Reflections. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (02):219-226.score: 66.0
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  45. John Kelsay (2010). Response to Papers for “Ethnography, Anthropology, and Comparative Religious Ethics” Focus. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):485-493.score: 66.0
    The Center for the Study of World Religions (CSWR) project represented here through papers by Thomas Lewis, Aaron Stalnaker, Hans Lucht, and Lee Yearley (with responses) was motivated by the judgment that the trend toward a focus on virtue ethics, with attendant concern for techniques of forming selves, creates an opportunity for a dialogue with ethnographers. I argue that the CSWR essays neglect social and institutional considerations, as well as overdrawing the distinction between “formalist” and virtue approaches to the (...)
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  46. Carolyn Sargent & Carolyn Smith-Morris (2006). Questioning Our Principles: Anthropological Contributions to Ethical Dilemmas in Clinical Practice. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (02):123-134.score: 66.0
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  47. Elisabeth Hildt (2006). Electrodes in the Brain: Some Anthropological and Ethical Aspects of Deep Brain Stimulation. International Review of Information Ethics 5 (9):33-39.score: 66.0
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  48. Hillel Braude (2012). Normativity Unbound: Liminality in Palliative Care Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (2):107-122.score: 66.0
    This article applies the anthropological concept of liminality to reconceptualize palliative care ethics. Liminality possesses both spatial and temporal dimensions. Both these aspects are analyzed to provide insight into the intersubjective relationship between patient and caregiver in the context of palliative care. Aristotelian practical wisdom, or phronesis, is considered to be the appropriate model for palliative care ethics, provided it is able to account for liminality. Moreover, this article argues for the importance of liminality for providing an (...)
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  49. Klaus Hoeyer & Niels Lynöe (2006). Motivating Donors to Genetic Research? Anthropological Reasons to Rethink the Role of Informed Consent. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):13-23.score: 66.0
    In this article we explore the contribution from social anthropology to the medical ethical debates about the use of informed consent in research, based on blood samples and other forms of tissue. The article springs from a project exploring donors’ motivation for providing blood and healthcare data for genetic research to be executed by a Swedish start-up genomics company. This article is not confined to empirical findings, however, as we suggest that anthropology provides reason to reassess the theoretical understanding of (...)
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  50. Kristin Zeiler (2014). A Phenomenological Approach to the Ethics of Transplantation Medicine: Sociality and Sharing When Living-with and Dying-with Others. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (5):369-388.score: 66.0
    Recent years have seen a rise in the number of sociological, anthropological, and ethnological works on the gift metaphor in organ donation contexts, as well as in the number of philosophical and theological analyses of giving and generosity, which has been mirrored in the ethical debate on organ donation. In order to capture the breadth of this field, four frameworks for thinking about bodily exchanges in medicine have been distinguished: property rights, heroic gift-giving, sacrifice, and gift-giving as aporia. Unfortunately, (...)
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