Search results for 'Anthropological ethics' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  8
    Axel Honneth (2009). Problems of Ethical Pluralism: Arnold Gehlen's Anthropological Ethics. Iris 1 (1):187-194.
    In this article the challenge of a pluralist ethics presented by Arnold Gehlen in his book Moral und Hypermoral [Morality and Hypermorality] is examined by attempting to find out what might still be worth preserving after Jürgen Habermas’s critical objections to the text in his “Arnold Gehlen: Imitation Substantiality” (1970). To this end the basic assumptions of Gehlen’s pluralist ethics are briefly presented (1), before going on to summarizing Habermas’s central, and largely convincing, objections to this ethics (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  1
    E. Whittaker (1981). Anthropological Ethics, Fieldwork and Epistemological Disjunctures. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 11 (4):437-451.
  3. K. Vonfritz (1980). Aristotle Anthropological Ethics. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 87 (2):242-257.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Kurt von Fritz (1981). Aristotle's Anthropological Ethics and Its Relevance to Modern Problems. Journal of the History of Ideas 42 (2):187.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  26
    Myriam Gerhard (2009). Maio G, Clausen J, Müller O (Eds) Human Without Measure? Scope and Limits of Anthropological Arguments in Biomedical Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (5):571-573.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  9
    Robert Lyman Potter (2001). In the Face of Suffering: The Philosophical- Anthropological Foundations of Clinical Ethics, by Jos V. M. Welie. Omaha, Nebr.: Creighton University Press, 1998. 293 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):115-116.
    This book is for those searching for an ethics engine with enough philosophical power to drive healthcare reform toward a balance between medical technology and human compassion. Jos Welie's project is to This is an important goal that has eluded others. Jos Welie has more nearly succeeded in this book than any other author who has come to my attention.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  1
    Nigel Biggar (2013). Evolutionary Biology, 'Enlightened' Anthropological Narratives, and Social Morality: A View From Christian Ethics. Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (2):152-157.
    The natural evolution of ethics is commonly understood in terms of the development from the selfish struggle to survive, via prudent cooperation, to altruism. However, cooperation that is prudent in the sense of serving basically selfish interests is not really altruistic. Besides, Christian ethics should not identify morality with absolutely disinterested altruism. Self-interest is only selfish when it is disproportionate or unfair; otherwise it is morally legitimate. Therefore the natural evolution of ethics is better understood as the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Jan van Baal (1981). Man's Quest for Partnership: The Anthropological Foundations of Ethics and Religion. Van Gorcum.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Arthur Kleinman (2006). Ethics and Experience: An Anthropological Approach to Health Equity. In Sudhir Anand, Fabienne Peter & Amartya Sen (eds.), Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. OUP Oxford
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  3
    Joel S. Kahn (2005). Anthropology's Malaysian Interlocutors : Toward a Cosmopolitan Ethics of Anthropological Practice. In Lynn Meskell & Peter Pels (eds.), Embedding Ethics. Berg 101.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Pradeep Jeganathan (2005). Pain, Politics, and the Epistemological Ethics of Anthropological Disciplinarity. In Lynn Meskell & Peter Pels (eds.), Embedding Ethics. Berg
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. S. Kaiser (2002). Ruth M. Krulfeld and Jeffery L. Macdonald (Eds), Power, Ethics, and Human Rights: Anthropological Studies of Refugee Research and Action. [REVIEW] Ethics, Policy and Environment 5:88-90.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Stephen Nugent (2003). Anthropological Discourse and Ethics. In Patricia Caplan (ed.), The Ethics of Anthropology: Debates and Dilemmas. Routledge 77.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  72
    Marilyn Strathern (ed.) (2000). Audit Cultures: Anthropological Studies in Accountability, Ethics, and the Academy. Routledge.
    If cultures are always in the making, this book catches one kind of culture on the make. Academics will be familiar with audit in the form of research and teaching assessments - they may not be aware how pervasive practices of 'accountability' are or of the diversity of political regimes under which they flourish. Twelve social anthropologists from across Europe and the Commonwealth chart an influential and controversial cultural phenomenon.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  15.  20
    Stanley R. Barrett (1984). Racism, Ethics and the Subversive Nature of Anthropological Inquiry. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (1):1-25.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Alberto Corsín Jiménez (ed.) (2008). Culture and Well-Being: Anthropological Approaches to Freedom and Political Ethics. Pluto Press.
    The concept of well-being has emerged as a key category of social and political thought, especially in the fields of moral and political philosophy, development studies, and economics. This book takes a critical look at the notion of well-being by examining what well-being means, or could mean, to people living in a number of different regions including Sudan, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, India, Sierra Leone, and the UK. The contributors take issue with some of the assumptions behind Western concepts of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. G. Maio, J. Clausen & O. Müller (2009). Human Without Measure? Scope and Limits of Anthropological Arguments in Biomedical Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (5):571-573.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Bronislaw Malinowski (1936/1977). The Foundations of Faith and Morals: An Anthropological Analysis of Primitive Beliefs and Conduct with Special Reference to the Fundamental Problems of Religion and Ethics: Delivered Before the University of Durham at Armstrong College, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, February 1935. Norwood Editions.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Kliegel Matthias (2000). Does the Brain Make the Person? Anthropological Remarks on the Ethics of Human Brain Research: A Theologian's Perspective. Ethik in der Medizin 12 (2).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  6
    Francisco M. Salzano & A. Magdalena Hurtado (eds.) (2004). Lost Paradises and the Ethics of Research and Publication. Oxford University Press.
    In 2000, the world of anthropology was rocked by a high-profile debate over the fieldwork performed by two prominent anthropologists, Napoleon Chagnon and James V. Neel, among the Yanamamo tribe of South America. The controversy was fueled by the publication of Patrick Tierney's incendiary Darkness in El Dorado which accused Chagnon of not only misinterpreting but actually inciting some of the violence he perceived among these "fierce people". Tierney also pointed the finger at Neel as the unwitting agent of a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Patricia Caplan (ed.) (2003). The Ethics of Anthropology: Debates and Dilemmas. Routledge.
    Since the inception of their discipline, anthropologists have studied virtually every conceivable aspect of other peoples' morality - religion, social control, sin, virtue, evil, duty, purity and pollution. But what of the examination of anthropology itself, and of its agendas, epistemes, theories and praxes? Conceived as a response to Patrick Tierney's hugely inflammatory book Darkness in El Dorado , whose allegations of immoral and negligent anthropological research in South America caused a storm of protest and debate, the book combines (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  18
    Wim Dekkers (1999). The Lived Body as Aesthetic Object in Anthropological Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):117-128.
    Medicine does not usually consider the human body from an aesthetic point of view. This article explores the notion of the lived body as aesthetic object in anthropological medicine, concentrating on the views of Buytendijk and Straus on human uprightness and gracefulness. It is argued that their insights constitute a counter-balance to the way the human body is predominantly approached in medicine and medical ethics. In particular, (1) the relationship between anthropological, aesthetic and ethical norms, (2) the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  16
    Michael M. J. Fischer (2003). Emergent Forms of Life and the Anthropological Voice. Duke University Press.
    Now, in Emergent Forms of Life and the Anthropological Voice, path-breaking scholar Michael M. J. Fischer moves the discussion to a consideration of the ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  24.  39
    Lynn Meskell & Peter Pels (eds.) (2005). Embedding Ethics. Berg.
    Embedding Ethics questions why ethics have been divorced from scientific expertise. Invoking different disciplinary practices from biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology, contributors show how ethics should be resituated at the heart of, rather than exterior to, scientific activity. Positioning the researcher as a negotiator of significant truths rather than an adjudicator of a priori precepts enables contributors to relocate ethics in new sets of social and scientific relationships triggered by recent globalization processes--from new forms of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  14
    Michael Lambek (ed.) (2011). Ordinary Ethics: Anthropology, Language, and Action. Fordham University Press.
    Bringing together ethnographic exposition with philosophical concepts and arguments and effectively transcending subdisciplinary boundaries between cultural and ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  26. Eric Wakin (1992). Anthropology Goes to War: Professional Ethics & Counterinsurgency in Thailand. University of Wisconsin, Center for Southeast Asian Studies.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  26
    Heidi Armbruster & Anna Lærke (eds.) (2008). Taking Sides: Ethics, Politics, and Fieldwork in Anthropology. Berghahn Books.
    This volume, written by a new generation of scholars engaged with contemporary global movements for social justice and peace, reflects their efforts in trying ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  7
    Richard J. Chacon & Ruben G. Mendoza (eds.) (2012). The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research: Reporting on Environmental Degradation and Warfare. Springer.
    This work documents the ethical dilemmas faced by anthropologists and researchers in general when investigating Amerindian communities.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  66
    Mark Goodale (ed.) (2009). Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume synthesizes these different approaches and demonstrates how anthropologists have engaged with human rights as committed activists, empirical ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Michael A. Rynkiewich & James P. Spradley (eds.) (1976/1981). Ethics and Anthropology: Dilemmas in Fieldwork. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  36
    Benedetta Giovanola (2009). Re-Thinking the Anthropological and Ethical Foundation of Economics and Business: Human Richness and Capabilities Enhancement. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):431 - 444.
    This article aims at showing the need for a sound ethical and anthropological foundation of economics and business, and argues the importance of a correct understanding of human values and human nature for the sake of economics and of businesses themselves. It is suggested that the ethical-anthropological side of economics and business can be grasped by taking Aristotle’s virtue ethics and Amartya Sen’s capability approach (CA) as major reference points. We hold that an “Aristotelian economics of virtues”, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  32.  25
    Chong Ju Choi, Tarek Ibrahim Eldomiaty & Sae Won Kim (2007). Consumer Trust, Social Marketing and Ethics of Welfare Exchange. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):17 - 23.
    The global corporate scandals such as Enron, Worldcom and Global Crossing have raised fundamental issues of business ethics as well as economic, social and anthropological questions concerning the nature of business competition and global capitalism. The purpose of this conceptual paper is to introduce the concept of "welfare exchange" to the existing notions of economic, social and anthropological notions of business and exchange in markets and society in the 21st century. Global competition and business success in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  33.  11
    Nelson Maldonado‐Torres (2014). Race, Religion, and Ethics in the Modern/Colonial World. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (4):691-711.
    The concept of religion as an anthropological category and the idea of race as an organizing principle of human identification and social organization played a major role in the formation of modern/colonial systems of symbolic representation that acquired global significance with the expansion of Western modernity. The modern concepts of religion and race were mutually constituted and together became two of the most central categories in drawing maps of subjectivity, alterity, and sub-alterity in the modern world. This makes the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  28
    Antonio Argandoña (2008). Integrating Ethics Into Action Theory and Organizational Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):435 - 446.
    A serious attempt to integrate ethics in management was done by Professor Juan Antonio Pérez López (1934–1996). His thought represents a break with current scholarly thinking on these subjects. The purpose of this article is to explain some of the most significant aspects of his theories, relating basically to his recourse to ethics as what defines the characteristic behavior of human beings, considered as individuals and as members of organizations. Pérez López used the anthropological conception underlying the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  35.  28
    Arianna Ferrari, Christopher Coenen & Armin Grunwald (2012). Visions and Ethics in Current Discourse on Human Enhancement. NanoEthics 6 (3):215-229.
    Since it is now broadly acknowledged that ethics should receive early consideration in discourse on emerging technologies, ethical debates tend to flourish even while new fields of technology are still in their infancy. Such debates often liberally mix existing applications with technologies in the pipeline and far-reaching visions. This paper analyses the problems associated with this use of ethics as “preparatory” research, taking discourse on human enhancement in general and on pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement in particular as an example. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  36. Klaus Hoeyer (2006). Ethics Wars”: Reflections on the Antagonism Between Bioethicists and Social Science Observers of Biomedicine. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):203 - 227.
    Social scientists often lament the fact that philosophically trained ethicists pay limited attention to the insights they generate. This paper presents an overview of tendencies in sociological and anthropological studies of morality, ethics and bioethics, and suggests that a lack in philosophical interest might be related to a tendency among social scientists to employ either a deficit model (social science perspectives accommodate the sense of context that philosophical ethics lacks), a replacement model (social scientists have finally found (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  37.  19
    Henri Mbulu (2013). On the Anthropological Foundation of Bioethics: A Critique of the Work of J.-F. Malherbe. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (5):409-431.
    In this article, I critically analyze the anthropological foundation of the bioethics of philosopher Jean-François Malherbe, particularly as presented in his book, Pour une Éthique de la Médecine. Malherbe argues that such practices as organ donation and transplants, assisted reproduction, resuscitation, and other uses of biotechnologies in contemporary medicine are unethical because they go against essential human nature. Furthermore, he uses this position as a basis to prescribe public policy and institutional practice. In contrast, I argue not only that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  6
    Hillel Braude (2012). Normativity Unbound: Liminality in Palliative Care Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (2):107-122.
    This article applies the anthropological concept of liminality to reconceptualize palliative care ethics. Liminality possesses both spatial and temporal dimensions. Both these aspects are analyzed to provide insight into the intersubjective relationship between patient and caregiver in the context of palliative care. Aristotelian practical wisdom, or phronesis, is considered to be the appropriate model for palliative care ethics, provided it is able to account for liminality. Moreover, this article argues for the importance of liminality for providing an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  5
    Kristin Zeiler (2014). A Phenomenological Approach to the Ethics of Transplantation Medicine: Sociality and Sharing When Living-with and Dying-with Others. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (5):369-388.
    Recent years have seen a rise in the number of sociological, anthropological, and ethnological works on the gift metaphor in organ donation contexts, as well as in the number of philosophical and theological analyses of giving and generosity, which has been mirrored in the ethical debate on organ donation. In order to capture the breadth of this field, four frameworks for thinking about bodily exchanges in medicine have been distinguished: property rights, heroic gift-giving, sacrifice, and gift-giving as aporia. Unfortunately, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  1
    Mohsen Rezaei Aderyani & Mehrzad Kiani (2015). A Comparative Study of the Foundations of Medical Ethics in Secular and Islamic Thought. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (40):27-46.
    The principles of medical ethics, common as they are in the world at the present time, have been formed in the context of Western secular communities; consequently, secular principles and values are inevitably manifested in all corners of medical ethics. Medical ethics is at its infancy in Iran. In order to incorporate medical ethics into the country's health system, either the same thoughts, principles, rules, and codes of Western communities should be translated and taught across the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  1
    Richard Price (2011). From The Teachings of Don Juan to Travels with Tooy: One Anthropologist's Trip. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):136-158.
    This article was presented as the Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness Distinguished Lecture, 19 November 2010, New Orleans. It highlights four decades of changes in the anthropology of consciousness, US society, and the author's views of “religion.” It also interrogates the shifting ethics of writing about friends (or about anyone else) and the special responsibilities of ethnographers. It ends with a consideration of the challenge of writing about people in possession, a special case of the problematic representation of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Jan-Christoph Heilinger (2014). Anthropological Arguments in the Ethical Debate About Human Enhancement. Humana.Mente 26:95–116.
    The paper discusses the role of anthropological arguments in contemporary ethics as exemplified in the current debate about biotechnological human enhancement interventions. Anthropological arguments refer to a normative conception of what it means to be a human being and are highly contested in contemporary moral philosophy. Most often they are promoted to constrain the ethically acceptable use of enhancement technologies. I argue that anthropological arguments can play a fundamental and important role in assessing the moral qualities (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  47
    Jeremy MacClancy (ed.) (2002). Exotic No More: Anthropology on the Front Lines. University of Chicago Press.
    Since its founding in the nineteenth century, social anthropology has been seen as the study of exotic peoples in faraway places. But today more and more anthropologists are dedicating themselves not just to observing but to understanding and helping solve social problems wherever they occur--in international aid organizations, British TV studios, American hospitals, or racist enclaves in Eastern Europe, for example. In Exotic No More , an initiative of the Royal Anthropological Institute, some of today's most respected anthropologists demonstrate, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  14
    Thomas A. Lewis (2010). Ethnography, Anthropology, and Comparative Religious Ethics: Or Ethnography and the Comparative Religious Ethics Local. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):395-403.
    Recent ethnographic studies of lived ethics, such as those of Leela Prasad and Saba Mahmood, present valuable opportunities for comparative religious ethics. This essay argues that developments in philosophical and religious ethics over the last three decades have supported a strong interest in thick descriptions of what it means to be human. This anthropological turn has thereby laid important groundwork for the encounter between these scholars and new ethnographic studies. Nonetheless, an encounter it is. Each side (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45.  87
    Klaus Hoeyer, Lisa Dahlager & Niels Lynöe (2006). Ethical Conflicts During the Social Study of Clinical Practice: The Need to Reassess the Mutually Challenging Research Ethics Traditions of Social Scientists and Medical Researchers. Clinical Ethics 1 (1):41-45.
    When anthropologists and other social scientists study health services in medical institutions, tensions sometimes arise as a result of the social scientists and health care professionals having different ideas about the ethics of research. In order to resolve this type of conflict and to facilitate mutual learning, we describe two general categories of research ethics framing: those of anthropology and those of medicine. The latter focuses on protection of the individual through the preservation of autonomy expressed through the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Ceres Víctora (ed.) (2004). Antropologia E Ética: O Debate Atual No Brasil. Editora da Universidade Federal Fluminense.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47.  15
    Bernd Frohmann (2007). Assembling an African Information Ethics. International Review of Information Ethics 7:1-11.
    The Tshwane Conference on African Information Ethics of 5-7 February 2007 forces the question, What is an African information ethics? This question is addressed with reference to the complexities of a distinctly African information ethics, taking into account the distinction between ethics and morality, and the assumptions of the language of the Tshwane Declaration on Information Ethics in Africa. Gilles Deleuze‘s concept of assem-blage, analyzed from the perspectives of Bruno Latour‘s concept of ―reassembling the social‖ (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  48
    Shiela Reaves (2011). Rethinking Visual Ethics: Evolution, Social Comparison and the Media's Mono-Body in the Global Rise of Eating Disorders. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (2):114 - 134.
    This study applies evolution theory to visual ethics and argues that social comparison theory favored by scholars of eating disorders is actually a Darwinian maladaptation to the media's widespread digital manipulation of women's bodies creating the thin ideal. An evolutionary perspective suggests how the media is enmeshed and why social comparison of the mediated ?mono-body? will continue. This study has three sections: 1) evolution theory and morality; 2) social comparison, biology of the social gaze, and anthropological evidence of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  14
    Hubert Doucet (2007). Anthropological Challenges Raised by Neuroscience: Some Ethical Reflections. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (2):219-226.
    The Nobel Laureate Illya Prigogine compares the recent breakthroughs in human biology to the major changes that occurred when the Neolithic period succeeded the Paleolithic, 12,000 years ago. Although there is disagreement about the meaning of these changes, most opposing views recognize that a “major transformation” took place. Some interpret the recent breakthroughs in neuroscience as the first step toward “our posthuman future” whereas others see the consequences of these achievements as the end of humankind. Genomics and neuroscience are the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  5
    V. Egede-Nissen, R. Jakobsen, G. S. Sellevold & V. Sorlie (2012). Time Ethics for Persons with Dementia in Care Homes. Nursing Ethics 20 (1):0969733012448968.
    The purpose of this study was to explore situations experienced by 12 health-care providers working in two nursing homes. Individual interviews, using a narrative approach, were conducted. A phenomenological–hermeneutical method, developed for researching life experiences, was applied in the analysis. The findings showed that good care situations are experienced when the time culture is flexible, the carers act in a sovereign time rhythm, not mentioning clock time or time as a stress factor. The results are discussed in terms of (...) and sociological theory: time as event and action and flexible time cultures. Care settings for persons with dementia represent many challenges, such as a heavy workload and time strain. Time ethics is a construction, understanding time used in caring for persons suffering from dementia, which involves a mature, responsible and flexible nursing approach to these patients. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000