Search results for 'Anthropomorphism' (try it on Scholar)

146 found
Sort by:
  1. Fredrik Karlsson (2012). Critical Anthropomorphism and Animal Ethics. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (5):707-720.score: 18.0
    Anthropomorphism has long been considered a cardinal error when describing animals. Ethicists have feared the consequences of misrepresenting animals in their reasoning. Recent research within human-animal studies, however, has sophisticated the notion of anthropomorphism. It is suggested that avoiding anthropomorphism merely creates other morphisms, such as mechanomorphism. Instead of avoiding anthropomorphism, it is argued that it is a communicative strategy that should be used critically. Instances of anthropomorphism in animal ethics are analyzed in this paper. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kathleen V. Wilkes (1975). Anthropomorphism and Analogy in Psychology. Philosophical Quarterly 25 (April):126-137.score: 18.0
    This article defends psychology and psychoanalysis against the accusation that their use of anthropomorphism in descriptions of brain and mind reintroduces the 'little man in the brain' and generates a viciously circular analysis. It queries the clarity of the concept 'anthropomorphic', And argues that many predicates which are allegedly 'characteristically human' are freely and literally attributable to machines, Parts of the brain, Etc.; this merely points out the unsurprising fact that non-Humans often perform tasks which humans can also perform. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Kristin Andrews & Brian Huss (forthcoming). Anthropomorphism, Anthropectomy, and the Null Hypothesis. Biology and Philosophy:1-19.score: 18.0
    We examine the claim that the methodology of psychology leads to a bias in animal cognition research against attributing “anthropomorphic” properties to animals (Sober in Thinking with animals: new perspectives on anthropomorphism. Columbia University Press, New York, pp 85–99, 2005; de Waal in Philos Top 27:225–280, 1999). This charge is examined in light of a debate on the role of folk psychology between primatologists who emphasize similarities between humans and other apes, and those who emphasize differences. We argue that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Sarah Stebbins (1993). Anthropomorphism. Philosophical Studies 69 (2-3):113-122.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David R. Hilbert (1993). Comments on Anthropomorphism. Philosophical Studies 69 (2-3):123-127.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Kathleen C. Gerbasi, Penny L. Bernstein, Laura L. Scaletta & C. Nuka Plante (2011). Why so FURious? Rebuttal of Dr. Fiona Probyn-Rapsey's Response to Gerbasi Et Al.'S Furries From A to Z (Anthropomorphism to Zoomorphism)”. Society and Animals 19 (3):302-304.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Kathleen C. Gerbasi, Laura L. Scaletta, C. Nuka Plante & Penny L. Bernstein (2011). Why so FURious? Rebuttal of Dr. Fiona Probyn-Rapsey's Response to Gerbasi Et Al.'S Furries From A to Z (Anthropomorphism to Zoomorphism)”. Society and Animals 19 (3):302-304.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Timothy A. Pychyl & Nikolina M. Duvall Antonacopoulos (2010). The Possible Role of Companion-Animal Anthropomorphism and Social Support in the Physical and Psychological Health of Dog Guardians. Society and Animals 18 (4):379-395.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. James A. Serpell (2002). Anthropomorphism and Anthropomorphic Selection—Beyond the "Cute Response". Society and Animals 10 (4):437-454.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Colin Allen, Conditioned Anti-Anthropomorphism.score: 12.0
    How should scientists react to anthropomorphism (defined for the purposes of this paper as the attribution of mental states or properties to nonhuman animals)? Many thoughtful scientists have attempted to accommodate some measure of anthropomorphism in their approaches to animal behavior. But Wynne will have none of it. We reject his argument against anthropomorphism and argue that he does not pay sufficient attention to the historical facts or to the details of alternative approaches.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Joseph Agassi, Anthropomorphism in Science.score: 12.0
    ANTHROPOMORPHISM is an inveterate tendency to project human qualities into natural phenomena—consciously or not. The standard and most important variant of anthropomorphism is animism which sees a soul in everything in nature. Before entering into the role of anthropomorphism in the history of science, let us consider a few important and usually neglected logical aspects of the idea.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Brian L. Keeley (2004). Anthropomorphism, Primatomorphism, Mammalomorphism: Understanding Cross-Species Comparisons. Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):521-540.score: 12.0
    The charge that anthropomorphizing nonhuman animals is a fallacy is itself largely misguided and mythic. Anthropomorphism in the study of animal behavior is placed in its original, theological context. Having set the historical stage, I then discuss its relationship to a number of other, related issues: the role of anecdotal evidence, the taxonomy of related anthropomorphic claims, its relationship to the attribution of psychological states in general, and the nature of the charge of anthropomorphism as a categorical claim. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.) (1997). Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. SUNY Press.score: 12.0
    This is the first book to evaluate the significance and usefulness of the practices of anthropomorphism and anecdotalism for understanding animals.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Sandra D. Mitchell, Anthropomorphism: Cross-Species Modeling.score: 12.0
    There has been a recent resurgence of interest in anthropomorphism, attributable to both the rise of cognitive ethology and the requirements of various forms of expanded, environmental ethics. The manner and degree to which non-human animals are similar to human beings has thus become a focus of scientific research and a necessary component to our decisions to act morally. At its basis, anthropomorphism involves claims about the similarity of non-human objects or beings to humans. Critics of anthropomorphism (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Mats Bergman (2007). Development, Purpose, and the Spectre of Anthropomorphism: Sundry Comments on T. L. Short's. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4).score: 12.0
    : T. L. Short's Peirce's Theory of Signs offers a strong interpretation of semeiotic, advocating a developmental and naturalistic position. This commentary examines some of the main features of Short's approach, raising a number of critical questions concerning the growth of Peirce's thought and the problem of anthropomorphism. First, two possible weaknesses in Short's account of the development of semeiotic, connected to the treatment of the "New List of Categories" and the role of the index, are noted. Next, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Elliott Sober (2012). Anthropomorphism, Parsimony, and Common Ancestry. Mind and Language 27 (3):229-238.score: 12.0
    I consider three theses that are friendly to anthropomorphism. Each makes a claim about what can be inferred about the mental life of chimpanzees from the fact that humans and chimpanzees both have behavioral trait B and humans produce this behavior by having mental trait M. The first thesis asserts that this fact makes it probable that chimpanzees have M. The second says that this fact provides strong evidence that chimpanzees have M. The third claims that the fact is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Mats Bergman (2007). Development, Purpose, and the Spectre of Anthropomorphism: Sundry Comments on T. L. Short's Peirce's Theory of Signs. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4):601 - 609.score: 12.0
    T. L. Short's Peirce's Theory of Signs offers a strong interpretation of semeiotic, advocating a developmental and naturalistic position. This commentary examines some of the main features of Short's approach, raising a number of critical questions concerning the growth of Peirce's thought and the problem of anthropomorphism. First, two possible weaknesses in Short's account of the development of semeiotic, connected to the treatment of the "New List of Categories" and the role of the index, are noted. Next, the menace (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Pamela J. Asquith (1997). Why Anthropomorphism is Not Metaphor: Crossing Concepts and Cultures in Animal Behavior Studies. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 22--34.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Stewart E. Guthrie (1997). Anthropomorphism: A Definition and a Theory. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 50--58.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. H. A. Herzog & S. Galvin (1997). Anthropomorphism, Common Sense, and Animal Awareness. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 237--53.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. J. Kiriazis & C. Slobodchikoff (1997). Anthropomorphism and the Study of Animal Language. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 365--369.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. H. Lyn Miles (1997). Anthropomorphism, Apes, and Language. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 383--404.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Robert W. Mitchell (1997). Anthropomorphism and Anecdotes: A Guide for the Perplexed. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 407--427.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Robert W. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. Lyn Miles (1997). Taking Anthropomorphism and Anecdotes Seriously. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 3--11.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Bernard E. Rollin (1997). Anecdote, Anthropomorphism, and Animal Behavior. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 125--33.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Robert L. Russell (1997). Anthropomorphism in Mother-Infant Interaction: Cultural Imperative or Scientific Acumen? In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 116--22.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Emanuela Cenami Spada (1997). Amorphism, Mechanomorphism, and Anthropomorphism. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Karyl B. Swartz & Sian Evans (1997). Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Mirrors. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 296--306.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Kristin Andrews (2011). Beyond Anthropomorphism: Attributing Psychological Properties to Animals. In Tom L. Beauchamp R. G. Frey (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Animal Ethics. Oxford University Press. 469--494.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Frans B. M. De Waal (1999). Anthropomorphism and Anthropodenial. Philosophical Topics 27 (1):255-280.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. N. Trakakis (2010). Does Univocity Entail Idolatry? Sophia 49 (4):535-555.score: 9.0
    Idolatry is vehemently rejected by the Abrahamic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), and closely connected with idolatry are certain varieties of anthropomorphism, which involve the attribution of a human form or personality to God. The question investigated in this paper is whether a highly anthropomorphic conception of God, one that commits the sin of idolatry, is entailed by a particular theory of religious language. This theory is the 'univocity thesis', the view that, for some substitutions for 'F', the sense (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. David M. Holley (2002). The Role of Anthropomorphism in Hume's Critique of Theism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 51 (2):83-99.score: 9.0
  33. Frank Keil, Conceptualizing a Nonnatural Entity: Anthropomorphism in God Concepts.score: 9.0
    We investigate the problem of how nonnatural entities are represented by examining university students’ concepts of God, both professed theological beliefs and concepts used in comprehension of narratives. In three story processing tasks, subjects often used an anthropomorphic God concept that is inconsistent with stated theological beliefs; and drastically distorted the narratives without any awareness of doing so. By heightening subjects’ awareness of their theological beliefs, we were able to manipulate the degree of anthropomorphization. This tendency to anthropomorphize may be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Claude Draude (2011). Intermediaries: Reflections on Virtual Humans, Gender, and the Uncanny Valley. [REVIEW] AI and Society 26 (4):319-327.score: 9.0
    Embodied interface agents are designed to ease the use of technology. Furthermore, they present one possible solution for future interaction scenarios beyond the desktop metaphor. Trust and believability play an important role in the relationship between user and the virtual counterpart. In order to reach this goal, a high degree of anthropomorphism in appearance and behavior of the artifact is pursued. According to the notion of the Uncanny Valley, however, this actually may have quite the opposite effect. This article (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Maurice Mandelbaum (1943). A Note on "Anthropomorphism" in Psychology. Journal of Philosophy 40 (9):246-248.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Wendy Lee-Lampshire (1996). Anthropomorphism Without Anthropocentrism: A Wittgensteinian Ecofeminist Alternative to Deep Ecology. Ethics and the Environment 1 (2):91 - 102.score: 9.0
    While articulating a philosophy of ecology which reconciles deep ecology with ecofeminism may be a laudable project, it remains at best unclear whether this attempt will be successful. I argue that one recent attempt, Carol Bigwood's feminized deep ecology, fails in that, despite disclaimers, it reproduces important elements of some deep ecologist's essentializing discourse which ecofeminists argue are responsible for the identification with and dual oppression of women and nature. I then propose an alternative model for conceiving and describing human (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. George J. Stack (1980). Nietzsche and Anthropomorphism. Crítica 12 (34):41 - 71.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Frederick Ferré (1984). In Praise of Anthropomorphism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16 (3):203 - 212.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Cameron Shelley (2002). The First Inconvenience of Anthropomorphism: The Disanalogy in Part IV of Hume's Dialogues. History of Philosophy Quarterly 19 (2):171-189.score: 9.0
  40. J. Douglas Ousley (1974). Evidence, Anthropomorphism and the Existence of God. Heythrop Journal 15 (3):298–302.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Frank Zelko (2012). From Blubber and Baleen to Buddha of the Deep: The Rise of the Metaphysical Whale. Society and Animals 20 (1):91-108.score: 9.0
    Human attitudes to various nonhuman animals have varied considerably\nacross cultures and throughout time. While some of our responses are\nundoubtedly instinctive and universal-a visceral fear of large\ncarnivores or the feeling of spontaneous warmth for creatures exhibiting\nhigh degrees of neoteny-it is clear that our attitude toward specific\nspecies is largely shaped by our innate anthropomorphism: that is, when\nwe think about animals, we are also thinking about ourselves. There are\nfew better examples of this than the shifting attitudes toward whales\nand dolphins throughout the 20th (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Stanley Tweyman (1982). An 'Inconvenience' of Anthropomorphism. Hume Studies 8 (1):19-42.score: 9.0
  43. Alistair Robinson (2004). Animal Rights, Anthropomorphism and Traumatized Fish. Philosophy Now 46:20-22.score: 9.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Edward Winters & Marco Frascari (1993). Monsters of Architecture: Anthropomorphism in Architectural Theory. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (171):251.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Binyamin Abrahamov (1996). Anthropomorphism and Interpretation of the Qur'ān in the Theology of Al-Qāsim Ibn Ibrāhīm: Kitāb Al-Mustarshid. Edited with Translation, Introduction and Notes. Brill.score: 9.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. J. B. Baillie (1917). Anthropomorphism and Truth. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 18:185 - 223.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Joe E. Barnhart (2013). Providence and Anthropomorphism in History and Politics: An Essay in Philosophy of History. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 15:49-58.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Gordon M. Burghardt (1988). Anecdotes and Critical Anthropomorphism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):248.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Gordon M. Burghardt (1990). Animal Suffering, Critical Anthropomorphism, and Reproductive Rights. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):14-15.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. G. M. Burghardt (1990). Critical Anthropomorphism, Animal Suffering and the Ecological Context. Hastings Center Report 20:15-32.score: 9.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 146