Search results for 'Antinomy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert S. Taylor (2009). Children as Projects and Persons: A Liberal Antinomy. Social Theory and Practice 35 (4):555-576.score: 24.0
    A liberal antinomy of parenting exists: strong liberal intuitions militate in favor of both denying special resources to parenting projects (on grounds of project-neutrality) and granting them (on grounds of respect for personhood). I show that we can reconcile these two claims by rejecting a premise common to both--viz. that liberalism is necessarily committed to extensive procreative liberties--and limiting procreation and subsequent parenting to adults who meet certain psychological and especially financial criteria. I also defend this argument, which provides (...)
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  2. Avery Goldman (2010). An Antinomy of Political Judgment: Kant, Arendt, and the Role of Purposiveness in Reflective Judgment. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):331-352.score: 24.0
    This article builds on Arendt’s development of a Kantian politics from out of the conception of reflective judgment in the Critique of Judgment. Arendt looks to Kant’s analysis of the beautiful to explain how political thought can be conceived. And yet Arendt describes such Kantian reflection as an empirical undertaking that justifies itself only in relation to the abstract principle of the moral law. The problem for such an account is that the autonomy of the moral law appears to be (...)
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  3. Michael C. Rhodes (2005). Logical Proof of Antinomy: A Trinitarian Interpretation of the Law of Identity. Theandros 2 (3).score: 21.0
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  4. Peter McLaughlin (1990). Kant's Critique of Teleology in Biological Explanation: Antinomy and Teleology. E. Mellen Press.score: 21.0
  5. Charles David Mattern (1941). Personal Freedom Within the Third Antinomy. Philadelphia.score: 21.0
     
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  6. Omri Boehm (2011). The First Antinomy and Spinoza. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):683 - 710.score: 18.0
    Scholars commonly assume that Kant never seriously engaged with Spinoza or Spinozism. However, in his later writings Kant argues several times that Spinozism is the most consistent form of transcendental realism. In the first part of the paper, I argue that the first Antinomy, debating the age and size of the world, already reflects Kant's confrontation with Spinozist metaphysics. Specifically, the position articulated in the Antithesis ? according to which the world is infinite and uncreated ? is Spinozist, not (...)
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  7. Benjamin Schnieder (2010). Inexpressible Properties and Grelling's Antinomy. Philosophical Studies 148 (3):369 - 385.score: 18.0
    The paper discusses whether there are strictly inexpressible properties. Three main points are argued for: (i) Two different senses of ‘predicate t expresses property p ’ should be distinguished. (ii) The property of being a predicate that does not apply to itself is inexpressible in one of the senses of ‘express’, but not in the other. (iii) Since the said property is related to Grelling’s Antinomy, it is further argued that the antinomy does not imply the non-existence of (...)
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  8. Sean Greenberg (2005). From Canon to Dialectic to Antinomy: Giving Inclinations Their Due. Inquiry 48 (3):232 – 248.score: 18.0
    In a recent paper, Eckart Förster challenges interpreters to explain why in the first Critique practical reason has a canon but no dialectic, whereas in the second Critique, there is not only a dialectic, but an antinomy of practical reason. In the Groundwork, Kant claims that there is a natural dialectic with respect to morality (4:405), a different claim from those advanced in the first and second Critiques. Förster's challenge may therefore be reformulated as the problem of explaining why (...)
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  9. Iuliana Corina Vaida (2009). A New Kantian Solution to the Third Antinomy of Pure Reason and to the Free Will Problem. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):403-431.score: 18.0
    The goal of this paper is to articulate a new solution to Kant’s third antinomy of pure reason, one that establishes the possibility ofincompatibilist freedom—the freedom presupposed by our traditional conceptions of moral responsibility, moral worth, and justice—without relying on the doctrine of transcendental idealism (TI). A discussion of Henry Allison’s “two-aspect” interpretation of Kant’s TI allows me both to criticize one of the best defenses of TI today and to advance my own TI-free solution to the third (...) by appeal to a thesis of epistemic modesty based on Paul Guyer’s realist interpretation of Kant’s theory of experience. According to this interpretation, the a priori forms of our sensibility and understanding are not forms that the mind imposes on a material whose real properties are unknowable to us but are instead forms that limit or filter the kinds of things we can experience and know. In particular, being causally determined is a real feature of things as they are in themselves, but the necessity and universality of our deterministic claims are relative, restricted to the objects of possible experience. Consequently, though a causally determined event cannot be free, the necessity and universality of determinism does not entail that free events (choices) cannot exist but that they cannot constitute objects of possible experience. After arguing that freedom is possible, I outline an argument for the reality of freedom, based on therequirements of morality. Finally, I argue that my view, though opposed to metaphysical naturalism, is consistent with scientific realism and methodological naturalism. (shrink)
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  10. Aleksandar Kellenberg (2010). The Antinomy of the Variable. Dialectica 64 (2):225-236.score: 18.0
    There is a solution to the antinomy of the variable that does not call for semantic relationism. I argue that if we carefully distinguish between variable types and variable tokens or occurrences, and if we take the number of variable types involved properly into account, then coordination among variable tokens or occurrences is reducible to an intrinsic semantic feature of those tokens or occurrences. The fact that two tokens or occurrences of the same variable type contained in the same (...)
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  11. Wolfgang Ertl (2002). Hume's Antinomy and Kant's Critical Turn. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (4):617-640.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to confirm that it was Hamann's translation of Hume's "Treatise" (I.4.7) which triggered Kant's critical turn in 1768/69. If this is indeed so, then Kant's inaugural dissertation must be reassessed, in particular the doctrine, to be found there, that we have cognitive access to the intelligible world. This doctrine is part of a strategy for tackling the problem highlighted by Hume; that there may be conflicting principles at work in the human mind, i.e., an (...)
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  12. Philippe Huneman (2014). Kant Vs. Leibniz in the Second Antinomy: Organisms Are Not Infinitely Subtle Machines. Kant-Studien 105 (2):155-195.score: 18.0
    This paper interprets the two pages devoted in the Critique of Pure Reason to a critique of Leibniz’s view of organisms as infinitely organized machines. It argues that this issue of organisms represents a crucial test-case for Kant in regard to the conflicting notions of space, continuity and divisibility held by classical metaphysics and by criticism. I first present Leibniz’s doctrine and its justification. In a second step, I explain the general reasoning by which Kant defines the problem of the (...)
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  13. Vito Sinisi (1976). Lesniewski's Analysis of Russell's Antinomy. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 17 (1):19-34.score: 18.0
    This article presents for the first time in english lesniewski's analysis of russell's antinomy as the analysis is given in lesniewski's 1914 paper "czy klasa klas, nie podporzadkowanych sobie, jest podporzadkowana sobie?" is the class of classes which are not subordinate to themselves subordinate to itself? it is shown how the concepts appearing in this paper, written in colloquial polish, were later incorporated and expressed as fundamental axioms and theorems of his theory of collective classes, mereology. in the 1914 (...)
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  14. Gordon Matheson (1959). The Antinomy of Designation. Philosophy of Science 26 (3):260-269.score: 18.0
    A new semantical antinomy, the antinomy of designation, is introduced into a metalanguage M with respect to a modal object language L. Carnap's device of restricting the principle of interchangeability for L does not suffice to prevent occurrence of this new antinomy. To achieve this result it seems most natural to replace the rules of designation for L by more complicated rules. This replacement suffices to prevent occurrence of the antinomy with respect to L. Moreover, it (...)
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  15. Roger Wertheimer (2000). The Synonymy Antinomy. In A. Kanamori (ed.), Proceedings of the 20th World Conress of Philosophy, Vol Vi , Analytic Philosophy and Logic. Philosophy Document Center. 67-88.score: 15.0
    Resolution of Frege's Puzzle by denying that synonym substitution in logical truths preserves sentence sense and explaining how logical form has semantic import. Intensional context substitutions needn't preserve truth, because intercepting doesn't preserve sentence meaning. Intercepting is nonuniformly substituting a pivotal term in syntactically secured truth. Logical sentences (GG: Greeks are Greeks; gg: Greece is Greece) and their synonym interceptions (GH: Greeks are Hellenes; gh: Greece is Hellas) share factual content (extrasentential reality asserted). Semantic (cognitive) content is (identifiable with) factual (...)
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  16. Angela Breitenbach (2008). Two Views on Nature: A Solution to Kant's Antinomy of Mechanism and Teleology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):351 – 369.score: 15.0
  17. Henry E. Allison (1992). Kant's Antinomy of Teleological Judgment. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (S1):25-42.score: 15.0
  18. Michelle Grier (1998). Transcendental Illusion and Transcendental Realism in Kant's Second Antinomy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6 (1):47 – 70.score: 15.0
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  19. William Lane Craig (1979). Kant's First Antinomy and the Beginning of the Universe. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 33 (4):553 - 567.score: 15.0
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  20. Mahrad Almotahari (2011). An Antinomy About Anaphora. Linguistic Inquiry 42 (3):509-517.score: 15.0
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  21. Michael Radner (1998). Unlocking the Second Antinomy: Kant and Wolff. Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (3):413-441.score: 15.0
  22. Milton Fried (1940). Kant's First Antinomy: A Logical Analysis. Mind 49 (194):204-218.score: 15.0
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  23. W. T. Harris (1894). Kant's Third Antinomy and His Fallacy Regarding the First Cause. Philosophical Review 3 (1):1-13.score: 15.0
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  24. A. J. Ayer (1973). On a Supposed Antinomy. Mind 82 (325):125-126.score: 15.0
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  25. Oscar Schmiege (2006). What is Kant's Second Antinomy About. Kant-Studien 97 (3):272-300.score: 15.0
    The central questions in this study are: (1) What does Kant consider the essence of the dispute between Rationalists and Realist Empiricists which he titles the “Second Conflict of the Transcendental Ideas?” (2) Why does he believe it supports such wider aims of the Critical Philosophy as: (a) showing the impossibility of a Transcendental Realist explanation of the spatiotemporal world, which amounts to an indirect proof of Transcendental Idealism (A 506/B 534); (b) being the only means for detecting the transcendental (...)
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  26. Edward Shils (1958). Tradition and Liberty: Antinomy and Interdependence. Ethics 68 (3):153-165.score: 15.0
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  27. Timothy M. Costelloe (2003). Hume, Kant, and the "Antinomy of Taste". Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (2):165-185.score: 15.0
  28. W. Michael Hoffman (1975). An Interpretation of Kant's Solution to the Third Antinomy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 13 (2):173-185.score: 15.0
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  29. E. A. Singer Jr (1909). Kant's First Antinomy. Philosophical Review 18 (4):384-395.score: 15.0
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  30. Ji Shu-li (1991). The Antinomy of Science and Democracy in Modern China. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (2):109 – 130.score: 15.0
    Abstract Up to now Chinese academia has been addicted to inviting the twin goddesses of democracy and science, but has regrettably ignored the innate incongruity between them, which has led to the rise of scientism. May 4th pioneers first introduced this value system, but tension between these values subsequently led to a prevailing preference for science over freedom. The early Marxists defined freedom as obedience to social laws formulated in Marxist ?science?, while Maoism finalized the Sinicization of Marxism with a (...)
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  31. Charles W. Cobb (1917). The First Antinomy of Kant. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 14 (25):688-690.score: 15.0
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  32. A. W. Moore (1992). A Note on Kant's First Antinomy. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (169):480-485.score: 15.0
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  33. Lewis Baldacchino (1984). Strawson on the Antinomy. Mind 93 (369):91-97.score: 15.0
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  34. Samuel Fleischacker (1989). A Fifth Antinomy. Philosophia 19 (1):23-27.score: 15.0
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  35. Christopher Janaway (1989). Knowing About Surprises: A Supposed Antinomy Revisited. Mind 98 (391):391-409.score: 15.0
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  36. Chris Naticchia (1994). Kant on the Third Antinomy: Is Freedom Possible in a World of Natural Necessity? History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (4):393 - 403.score: 15.0
  37. S. J. Al-Azm (1968). Absolute Space and Kant's First Antinomy of Pure Reason. Kant-Studien 59 (1-4):151-164.score: 15.0
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  38. John Zeis (1986). Ross's Antinomy and Modal Arguments for God's Existence. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):159 - 164.score: 15.0
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  39. N. Depraz (2013). An Experiential Phenomenology of Novelty: The Dynamic Antinomy of Attention and Surprise. Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):280-287.score: 15.0
    Context: In earlier joint work with Varela and Vermersch, we began the elaboration of a methodological and epistemological framework for a practical experiential phenomenology. Problem: I here wish to update and further develop that earlier work. Method: I present the framework of a practical, as distinct from a conceptual-theoretical, phenomenology. I update that framework, arguing for a shift in emphasis from consciousness to vigilant attention. I offer a still preliminary investigation of the important phenomenon of surprise. I link these results (...)
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  40. C. W. Berenda (1968). Phonons--The Quantization of Sound (and Kant's Second Antinomy). Philosophy of Science 35 (2):179-184.score: 15.0
  41. Martin G. Kalin (1978). Idealism Against Realism in Kant's Third Antinomy. Kant-Studien 69 (1-4):160-169.score: 15.0
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  42. Margaret Goldberg (1985). Entity and Antinomy in Tibetan Bsdus Grwa Logic (Part I). Journal of Indian Philosophy 13 (2):273-304.score: 15.0
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  43. M. S. Gram (1967). Kant's First Antinomy. The Monist 51 (4):499-518.score: 15.0
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  44. Ivor Leclerc (1966). Kant's Second Antinomy, Leibniz, and Whitehead. Review of Metaphysics 20 (1):25 - 41.score: 15.0
  45. Jay F. Rosenberg (1996). On a Certain Antinomy: Properties, Concepts and Items in Space. Philosophical Perspectives 10:357 - 383.score: 15.0
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  46. C. W. Berenda (1968). Phonons--The Quantization of Sound (And Kant's Second Antinomy. Philosophy of Science 35 (2):179 - 184.score: 15.0
    The recent extension of quantum theory to sound waves in solids is briefly outlined and then discussed from a specific philosophic (Kantian) perspective.
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  47. John D. Greenwood (1990). Kant's Third Antinomy. International Philosophical Quarterly 30 (1):43-57.score: 15.0
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  48. David E. Schrader (1991). The Antinomy of Divine Necessity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 30 (1):45 - 59.score: 15.0
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  49. Carol Donnell-Kotrozo (1980). Representation and Expression: A False Antinomy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (2):163-173.score: 15.0
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  50. Zeljko Loparic (1990). The Logical Structure of the First Antinomy. Kant-Studien 81 (3):280-303.score: 15.0
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