Search results for 'Antony Bryant' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. Bryant (2007). Liquid Modernity: Liquid Arts: With Contributions From Griselda Pollock, Zygmunt Bauman, Antony Bryant, Gustav Metzger-Editor's Introduction and Summary. Theory, Culture and Society 24 (1):109-110.score: 480.0
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  2. Louise M. Antony (1997). Meaning and Semantic Knowledge: Louise M. Antony. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):177–207.score: 120.0
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  3. Peter Gratton, Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Levi Bryant & Paul Ennis (2010). Interviews: Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant and Paul Ennis. Speculations 1 (1):84-134.score: 120.0
    The context for these interviews was a seminar [Peter Gratton] conducted on speculative realism in the Spring 2010. There has been great interest in speculative realism and one reason Gratton surmise[s] is not just the arguments offered, though [Gratton doesn't] want to take away from them; each of these scholars are vivid writers and great pedagogues, many of whom are in constant contact with their readers via their weblogs. Thus these interviews provided an opportunity to forward student questions about their (...)
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  4. Antony Bryant (2003). Cognitive Informatics, Distributed Representation and Embodiment. Brain and Mind 4 (2):215-228.score: 120.0
    This paper is a revised and extended version of a keynote contribution to a recent conference on Cognitive Informatics. It offers a brief summary of some of the core concerns of other contributions to the conference, highlighting the range of issues under discussion; and argues that many of the central concepts and preoccupations of cognitive informatics as understood by participants--and others in the general field of computation--rely on ill-founded realist assumptions, and what has been termed the functionalist view of representation. (...)
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  5. Stephanie Bryant & Feiyi Wang (2004). Stephanie Bryant and Feiyi Wang, Aspects of Adaptive Reconfiguration in a Scalable Intrusion Tolerant System, Complexity (2004) 9(2)74–83. [REVIEW] Complexity 9 (4):46-46.score: 120.0
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  6. Levi R. Bryant (2011). The Democracy of Objects. Open Humanities Press.score: 60.0
    Since Kant, philosophy has been obsessed with epistemological questions pertaining to the relationship between mind and world and human access to objects. In The Democracy of Objects Bryant proposes that we break with this tradition and once again initiate the project of ontology as first philosophy. Drawing on the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman, as well as the thought Roy Bhaskar, Gilles Deleuze, Niklas Luhman, Aristotle, Jacques Lacan, Bruno Latour and the developmental systems theorists, Bryant develops a realist (...)
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  7. Garry Bryant (1987). Ten-Fifty P. I.: Emotion and the Photographer's Role. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 2 (2):32 – 39.score: 60.0
    The emotional traumas news photographers experience are not often discussed outside the newsroom. Here professional newspaper photographer Garry Bryant offers a personal testimonial on the effects his job has had on him, as well as on the public. The excitement and drama of shooting spot news at accidents and disasters have caused a certain dulling of the senses, but on the other hand have heightened Bryant's awareness of the importance of his work. A variety of Bryant's favorite (...)
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  8. Levi R. Bryant (2008). Difference and Givenness: Deleuze's Transcendental Empiricism and the Ontology of Immanence. Northwestern University Press.score: 60.0
    From one end of his philosophical work to the other, Gilles Deleuze consistently described his position as a transcendental empiricism. But just what is transcendental about Deleuze’s transcendental empiricism? And how does his position fit with the traditional empiricism articulated by Hume? In Difference and Givenness , Levi Bryant addresses these long-neglected questions so critical to an understanding of Deleuze’s thinking. Through a close examination of Deleuze’s independent work--focusing especially on Difference and Repetition-- as well as his engagement with (...)
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  9. Joseph M. Bryant (1996). Moral Codes and Social Structure in Ancient Greece: A Sociology of Greek Ethics From Homer to the Epicureans and Stoics. State University of New York Press.score: 60.0
    Considering Greece from the Dark Age to the early Hellenistic era, Bryant (sociology, U. of New Brunswick, Canada) examines the main structural changes within the economic, political,.
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  10. Raymond L. Bryant (2005). Nongovernmental Organizations in Enviromental Struggles: Politics and Making Moral Capital in the Philippines. Yale University Press.score: 60.0
    Why are nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) so successful in today’s world? How do they empower themselves? This insightful book provides important new perspectives on the strategic thinking of NGOs, the way they identify themselves, and how they behave. Raymond L. Bryant develops a novel theoretical perspective around the concept of moral capital and assesses that concept through in-depth case studies of NGOs in the Philippines. The book’s focus is on perceptions of NGOs as moral and altruistic and how such perceptions (...)
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  11. Louise Antony (2012). Different Voices or Perfect Storm: Why Are There So Few Women in Philosophy? Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (3):227-255.score: 30.0
  12. Michael V. Antony (2002). Concepts of Consciousness, Kinds of Consciousness, Meanings of 'Consciousness'. Philosophical Studies 109 (1):1-16.score: 30.0
    The use of expressions like ‘concepts of consciousness’, ‘kinds of consciousness’, and ‘meanings of ‘consciousness’’ interchangeably is ubiquitous within the consciousness literature. It is argued that this practice can be made sense of in only two ways. The first involves interpreting ‘concepts of consciousness’ and ‘kinds of consciousness’ metalinguistically to mean concepts expressed by ‘consciousness’ and kinds expressed by ‘consciousness’; and the second involves certain literal, though semantically deviant, interpretations of those expressions. The trouble is that researchers typically use the (...)
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  13. Michael V. Antony (2008). Are Our Concepts Conscious State and Conscious Creature Vague? Erkenntnis 68 (2):239-263.score: 30.0
    Intuitively it has seemed to many that our concepts "conscious state" and "conscious creature" are sharp rather than vague, that they can have no borderline cases. On the other hand, many who take conscious states to be identical to, or realized by, complex physical states are committed to the vagueness of those concepts. In the paper I argue that "conscious state" and "conscious creature" are sharp by presenting four necessary conditions for conceiving borderline cases in general, and showing that some (...)
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  14. Louise M. Antony, What Are You Thinking? Character and Content in the Language of Thought.score: 30.0
  15. Louise Antony (2011). The Openness of Illusions. Philosophical Issues 21 (1):25-44.score: 30.0
    Illusions are thought to make trouble for the intuition that perceptual experience is "open" to the world. Some have suggested, in response to the this trouble, that illusions differ from veridical experience in the degree to which their character is determined by their engagement with the world. An understanding of the psychology of perception reveals that this is not the case: veridical and falsidical perceptions engage the world in the same way and to the same extent. While some contemporary vision (...)
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  16. Michael V. Antony (2006). Vagueness and the Metaphysics of Consciousness. Philosophical Studies 128 (3):515-538.score: 30.0
    An argument is offered for this conditional: If our current concept conscious state is sharp rather than vague, and also correct (at least in respect of its sharpness), then common versions of familiar metaphysical theories of consciousness are false--?namely versions of the identity theory, functionalism, and dualism that appeal to complex physical or functional properties in identification, realization, or correlation. Reasons are also given for taking seriously the claim that our current concept conscious state is sharp. The paper ends by (...)
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  17. Michael V. Antony (2001). Is 'Consciousness' Ambiguous? Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (2):19-44.score: 30.0
    It is widely assumed that ‘consciousness’ (and its cognates) is multiply ambiguous within the consciousness literature. Some alleged senses of the term are access consciousness, phenomenal consciousness, state consciousness, creature consciousness, introspective consciousness, self consciousness, to name a few. In the paper I argue for two points. First, there are few if any good reasons for thinking that such alleged senses are genuine: ‘consciousness’ is best viewed as univocal within the literature. The second point is that researchers would do best (...)
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  18. Michael V. Antony (2010). Where's the Evidence? Philosophy Now 78:18-21.score: 30.0
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  19. Michael V. Antony (2003). Davidson's Argument for Monism. Synthese 135 (1):1-12.score: 30.0
    Two criticisms of Davidson's argument for monism are presented. The first is that there is no obvious way for the anomalism of the mental to do any work in his argument. Certain implicit premises, on the other hand, entail monism independently of the anomalism of the mental, but they are question-begging. The second criticism is that even if Davidson's argument is sound, the variety of monism that emerges is extremely weak at best. I show that by constructing ontologically ``hybrid'' events (...)
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  20. Michael V. Antony (1994). Against Functionalist Theories of Consciousness. Mind and Language 9 (2):105-23.score: 30.0
    The paper contains an argument against functionalist theories of consciousness. The argument exploits an intuition to the effect that parts of an individual's brain (or of whatever else might realize the individual's mental states, processes, etc.) that are not in use at a time t, can have no bearing on whether that individual is conscious at t. After presenting the argument, I defend it against two possible objections, and then distinguish it from two arguments to which it appears, on the (...)
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  21. Michael V. Antony (2001). Conceiving Simple Experiences. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (3):263-86.score: 30.0
    That consciousness is composed of simple or basic elements that combine to form complex experiences is an idea with a long history. This idea is approached through an examination of our “picture” or conception of consciousness (CC). It is argued that CC commits us to a certain abstract notion of simple experiential events, or simples, and that traditional critiques of simple elements of experience do not threaten simples. To the extent that CC is taken to conform to how consciousness really (...)
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  22. Louise M. Antony (1989). Anomalous Monism and the Problem of Explanatory Force. Philosophical Review 98 (April):153-87.score: 30.0
    Concern about two problems runs through the work of davidson: the problem of accounting for the "explanatory force" of rational explanations, and the problem posed for materialism by the apparent anomalousness of psychological events. davidson believes that his view of mental causation, imbedded in his theory of "anomalous monism," can provide satisfactory answers to both questions. however, it is argued in this paper that davidson's program contains a fundamental inconsistency; that his metaphysics, while grounding the doctrine of anomalous monism, makes (...)
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  23. Louise M. Antony (2000). Natures and Norms. Ethics 111 (1):8-36.score: 30.0
  24. Louise M. Antony (1999). Making Room for the Mental. Philosophical Studies 95 (1-2):37-44.score: 30.0
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  25. Louise M. Antony (2003). Who's Afraid of Disjunctive Properties? Philosophical Issues 13 (1):1-21.score: 30.0
  26. Louise M. Antony (ed.) (2003). Chomsky and His Critics. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing.score: 30.0
    In this compelling volume, ten distinguished thinkers – William G. Lycan, Jeffrey Poland, Galen Strawson, Frances Egan, Georges Rey, Peter Ludlow, Paul ...
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  27. Michael V. Antony (forthcoming). Can We Acquire Knowledge of Ultimate Reality? In Jeanine Diller & Asa Kasher (eds.), Models of God and Other Ultimate Realities. Springer.score: 30.0
    Can humans acquire knowledge of ultimate reality, even significant or comprehensive knowledge? I argue that for all we know we can, and that is so whether ultimate reality is divine or non-divine. My strategy involves arguing that we are ignorant, in the sense of lacking public or shared knowledge, about which possibilities, if any, obtain for humans to acquire knowledge of ultimate reality. This follows from a deep feature of our epistemic situation—that our current psychology strongly constrains what we can (...)
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  28. Louise Antony (2010). Realization Theory and the Philosophy of Mind: Comments on Sydney Shoemaker's Physical Realization. Philosophical Studies 148 (1):89 - 99.score: 30.0
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  29. Michael V. Antony (1991). Fodor and Pylyshyn on Connectionism. Minds and Machines 1 (3):321-41.score: 30.0
    Fodor and Pylyshyn (1988) have argued that the cognitive architecture is not Connectionist. Their argument takes the following form: (1) the cognitive architecture is Classical; (2) Classicalism and Connectionism are incompatible; (3) therefore the cognitive architecture is not Connectionist. In this essay I argue that Fodor and Pylyshyn's defenses of (1) and (2) are inadequate. Their argument for (1), based on their claim that Classicalism best explains the systematicity of cognitive capacities, is an invalid instance of inference to the best (...)
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  30. Michael V. Antony (2002). Toward an Ontological Interpretation of Dennett's Theory of Consciousness. Philosophia 29 (1-4):343-370.score: 30.0
    While "Consciousness Explained" has received an enormous amount of attention since its publication, there is still little agreement on what Dennett’s account of consciousness is. Most interpreters treat his view as an instance of one or another of the standard ontological positions (functionalism, behaviorism, eliminativism, instrumentalism). I believe a different metaphysical account underlies Dennett’s view, one that is important though ill-understood. In the paper I attempt to point in the direction of a proper characterization of that account through the use (...)
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  31. Louise M. Antony (1994). The Inadequacy of Anomalous Monism as a Realist Theory of Mind. In Gerhard Preyer, F. Siebelt & A. Ulfig (eds.), Language, Mind, and Epistemology: On Donald Davidson's Philosophy. Dordrecht: Kluwer.score: 30.0
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  32. Michael V. Antony (2001). On the Temporal Boundaries of Simple Experiences. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (3):263-286.score: 30.0
    I have argued elsewhere that our conception of phenomenal consciousness commits us to simple phenomenal experiences that in some sense constitute our complex experiences. In this paper I argue that the temporal boundaries of simple phenomenal experiences cannot be conceived as fuzzy or vague, but must be conceived as instantaneous or maximally sharp. The argument is based on an account of what is involved in conceiving fuzzy temporally boundaries for events generally. If the argument is right, and our conception of (...)
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  33. Jennifer Hornsby, Louise Antony, Jennifer Saul, Natalie Stoljar, Nellie Wieland & Rae Langton (2012). Review Symposium: Rae Langton, Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. Jurisprudence 2 (2):379-440.score: 30.0
  34. Michael V. Antony (2006). Simulation Constraints, Afterlife Beliefs, and Common-Sense Dualism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):462-463.score: 30.0
    Simulation constraints cannot help in explaining afterlife beliefs in general because belief in an afterlife is a precondition for running a simulation. Instead, an explanation may be found by examining more deeply our common-sense dualistic conception of the mind or soul.
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  35. Louise M. Antony (1995). I'm a Mother, I Worry. Content 6:160-166.score: 30.0
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  36. Louise M. Antony & Joseph Levine (1997). Reduction with Autonomy. Philosophical Perspectives 11 (s11):83-105.score: 30.0
  37. Louise Antony (2004). A Naturalized Approach to the a Priori. Philosophical Issues 14 (1):1–17.score: 30.0
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  38. Michael V. Antony (1993). Social Relations and the Individuation of Thought. Mind 102 (406):247-61.score: 30.0
    Tyler Burge has argued that a necessary condition for individual's having many of the thoughts he has is that he bear certain relations to other language users. Burge's conclusion is based on a thought experiment in which an individual's social relations are imagined, counterfactually, to differ from how they are actually. The result is that it seems, counterfactually, the individual cannot be attributed many of the thoughts he can be actually. In the article, an alternative interpretation of Burge's thought experiment (...)
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  39. Michael V. Antony (1999). Outline of a General Methodology for Consciousness Research. Anthropology and Philosophy 3 (2):43-56.score: 30.0
    In spite of the enormous interdisciplinary interest in consciousness these days, sorely lacking are general methodologies in terms of which individual research efforts across disciplines can be seen as contributing to a common end. In the paper I outline such a methodology. The central idea is that empirically studying our conception of consciousness—what we have in mind when we think about consciousness—can lead to progress on consciousness itself. The paper clarifies and motivates that idea.
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  40. Louise Antony (ed.) (2007). Philosophers Without Gods: Meditations on Atheism and the Secular. Oup.score: 30.0
    In this revealing volume, 19 leading philosophers open a window on the inner life of atheism, shattering common stereotypes as they reveal how they came to turn ...
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  41. Michael V. Antony (2006). Papineau on the Vagueness of Phenomenal Concepts. Dialectica 60 (4):475-483.score: 30.0
    Papineau’s argument in "Thinking About Consciousness" for the vagueness or indeterminacy of phenomenal concepts is discussed. Several problems with his argument are brought out, and it is concluded that his argument fails to establish his desired conclusion.
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  42. Michael Antony (2011). All Due Respect - “Reasonable Atheism” by Aikin and Talisse Reviewed. [REVIEW] The Philosophers' Magazine (55):108-109.score: 30.0
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  43. Louise M. Antony (1996). Equal Rights for Swamp-Persons. Mind and Language 11 (1):70-75.score: 30.0
  44. Rebecca Roman Hanrahan & Louise M. Antony (2005). Because I Said So: Toward a Feminist Theory of Authority. Hypatia 20 (4):59-79.score: 30.0
    : Feminism is an antiauthoritarian movement that has sought to unmask many traditional "authorities" as ungrounded. Given this, it might seem as if feminists are required to abandon the concept of authority altogether. But, we argue, the exercise of authority enables us to coordinate our efforts to achieve larger social goods and, hence, should be preserved. Instead, what is needed and what we provide for here is a way to distinguish legitimate authority from objectionable authoritarianism.
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  45. Louise M. Antony (2001). Empty Heads? Mind and Language 16 (2):193-214.score: 30.0
  46. Louise M. Antony (1991). The Causal Relevance of the Mental. Mind and Language 6 (4):295-327.score: 30.0
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  47. Michael V. Antony (2004). Sidestepping the Semantics of “Consciousness”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):289-290.score: 30.0
    Block explains the conflation of phenomenal consciousness and access consciousness by appeal to the ambiguity of the term “consciousness.” However, the nature of ambiguity is not at all clear, and the thesis that “consciousness” is ambiguous between phenomenal consciousness and access consciousness is far from obvious. Moreover, the conflation can be explained without supposing that the term is ambiguous. Block's argument can thus be strengthened by avoiding controversial issues in the semantics of “consciousness.”.
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  48. Louise M. Antony (1997). Feeling Fine About the Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (2):381-87.score: 30.0
    The article presents a critique of John Searle's attack on computationalist theories of mind in his recent book, The Rediscovery of the Mind. Searle is guilty of caricaturing his opponents, and of ignoring their arguments. Moreover, his own positive theory of mind, which he claims "takes account of" subjectivity, turns out to offer no discernible advantages over the views he rejects.
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  49. David J. Bryant (1997). Representing Space in Language and Perception. Mind and Language 12 (3-4):239-264.score: 30.0
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