Search results for 'Anxiety' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jennifer Nagel (2010). Epistemic Anxiety and Adaptive Invariantism. Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):407-435.score: 18.0
    Do we apply higher epistemic standards to subjects with high stakes? This paper argues that we expect different outward behavior from high-stakes subjects—for example, we expect them to collect more evidence than their low-stakes counterparts—but not because of any change in epistemic standards. Rather, we naturally expect subjects in any condition to think in a roughly adaptive manner, balancing the expected costs of additional evidence collection against the expected value of gains in accuracy. The paper reviews a body of empirical (...)
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  2. Jyh-Shen Chiou & Lee-Yun Pan (2008). The Impact of Social Darwinism Perception, Status Anxiety, Perceived Trust of People, and Cultural Orientation on Consumer Ethical Beliefs. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (4):487 - 502.score: 18.0
    This study intends to explore the effects of political, social and cultural values on consumers’ ethical beliefs regarding questionable consumption behaviors. The variables examined include status anxiety, social Darwinism perception, perceived trust of people, and cultural orientation. Based on a field survey in Taiwan, the results showed that consumers with low ethical beliefs have higher perception of social Darwinism and status anxiety than consumers possess neutral and high ethical beliefs. The result also showed that the neutral ethics group (...)
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  3. Aret Karademir (2013). Heidegger and Foucault: On the Relation Between the Anxiety–Engendering–Truth and Being-Towards-Freedom. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (3):375-392.score: 18.0
    In his very last, now famous, interview, Michel Foucault states that his philosophical thought was shaped by his reading of Heidegger, even though he does not specify what aspects of Heidegger’s philosophy inspired him in the first place. However, his last interview is not the only place where Foucault refers to Heidegger as his intellectual guide. In his 1981/1982 lecture course, The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Foucault confesses that the way Heidegger conceptualized the relationship between subject and truth was a (...)
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  4. Olga Pollatos, Eva Traut-Mattausch, Heike Schroeder & Rainer Schandry (2007). Interoceptive Awareness Mediates the Relationship Between Anxiety and the Intensity of Unpleasant Feelings. Journal of Anxiety Disorders 21 (7):931-943.score: 18.0
  5. Steven Segal (1998). The Anxiety of Strangers and the Fear of Enemies. Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (4):271-282.score: 18.0
    In this paper I use a distinction between the "anxiety of strangers" and the "fear of enemies" to show how uncertainty and tension experienced in the face of what is other and different need not lead to a nationalist insularity, but can be the occasion for an existential philosophical education - an education in which the resolute acceptance of strangeness allows us to reflect on our taken-for-granted about the everyday.
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  6. B. W. Dunlop & J. Banja (2009). A Renewed, Ethical Defense of Placebo-Controlled Trials of New Treatments for Major Depression and Anxiety Disorders. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):384-389.score: 18.0
    The use of placebo as a control condition in clinical trials of major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders continues to be an area of ethical concern. Typically, opponents of placebo controls argue that they violate the beneficent-based, “best proven diagnostic and therapeutic method” that the original Helsinki Declaration of 1964 famously asserted participants are owed. A more consequentialist, oppositional argument is that participants receiving placebo might suffer enormously by being deprived of their usual medication(s). Nevertheless, recent findings of potential (...)
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  7. Inna Arnaudova, Angelos-Miltiadis Krypotos, Marieke Effting, Yannick Boddez, Merel Kindt & Tom Beckers (2013). Individual Differences in Discriminatory Fear Learning Under Conditions of Ambiguity: A Vulnerability Factor for Anxiety Disorders? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Complex fear learning procedures might be better suited than the common differential fear conditioning paradigm for detecting individual differences related to vulnerability for anxiety disorders. Two such procedures are the blocking procedure and the protection-from-overshadowing procedure. Their comparison allows for the examination of discriminatory fear learning under conditions of ambiguity. The present study examined the role of individual differences in such discriminatory fear learning. We hypothesized that heightened trait anxiety would be related to a deficit in discriminatory fear (...)
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  8. Stéphane Vautier, Etienne Mullet & Sylvie Bourdet-Loubère (2003). The Instruction Set of Questionnaires Can Affect the Structure of the Data: Application to Self-Rated State Anxiety. Theory and Decision 54 (3):249-259.score: 18.0
    The present study tested the assumption that self-ratings, such as those used for measuring state anxiety, do not measure a one-dimensional transcendent entity but involve decisions based on a multi-dimensional judgment. Two groups of subjects were presented with a balanced nine-item state anxiety questionnaire. Each group received a different set of instructions (a standard set and an altered instruction set suggesting unidimensionality of the questions in the questionnaire). It was hypothesized that this change in instructions would impact the (...)
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  9. Katherine Elizabeth Vytal, Brian R. Cornwell, Nicole Esther Arkin, Allison M. Letkiewicz & Christian Grillon (2013). The Complex Interaction Between Anxiety and Cognition: Insight From Spatial and Verbal Working Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Anxiety can be distracting, disruptive, and incapacitating. Despite problems with empirical replication of this phenomenon, one fruitful avenue of study has emerged from working memory (WM) experiments where a translational method of anxiety induction (risk of shock) has been shown to disrupt spatial and verbal WM performance. Performance declines when resources (e.g., spatial attention, executive function) devoted to goal-directed behaviors are consumed by anxiety. Importantly, it has been shown that anxiety-related impairments in verbal WM depend on (...)
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  10. Dirk Adolph, Lukas Meister & Bettina Maxi Pause (2013). Context Counts! Social Anxiety Modulates the Processing of Fearful Faces in the Context of Chemosensory Anxiety Signals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:283.score: 18.0
    During emotion perception, context is an important source of information. Whether contextual cues from modalities other than vision or audition influence the perception of social emotional information has not been investigated.Thus, the present study aimed at testing emotion perception and regulation in response to fearful facial expressions presented in the context of chemosensory stimuli derived from sweat of anxious individuals. In groups of high (HSA) and low socially anxious (LSA) participants we recorded the startle reflex (Experiment I), and analysed event-related (...)
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  11. Nick Berggren, Anne Richards, Joseph Taylor & Nazanin Derakshan (2013). Affective Attention Under Cognitive Load: Reduced Emotional Biases but Emergent Anxiety-Related Costs to Inhibitory Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Trait anxiety is associated with deficits in attentional control, particularly in the ability to inhibit prepotent responses. Here, we investigated this effect while varying the level of cognitive load in a modified antisaccade task that employed emotional facial expressions (neutral, happy, and angry) as targets. Load was manipulated using a secondary auditory task requiring recognition of tones (low load), or recognition of specific tone pitch (high load). Results showed that load increased antisaccade latencies on trials where gaze towards face (...)
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  12. Meghan Davis Caulfield, J. Devin McAuley & Richard J. Servatius (2013). Facilitated Acquisition of Eyeblink Conditioning in Those Vulnerable to Anxiety Disorders. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Behavioral inhibition (BI) increases vulnerability to develop anxiety disorders and is typified by avoidance and withdrawal from novel objects, people, and situations. The present study considered the relationship between behavioral inhibition and temperamental risk factors, such as trait anxiety and acquisition rate of a classically conditioned eyeblink response. 174 healthy undergraduate students (mean age 20.3 years, 71.8% female) were given the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and a battery of self-report measures of behavioral inhibition consisting of the Adult and (...)
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  13. Eva Gilboa-Schechtman & Iris Shachar-Lavie (2013). More Than a Face: A Unified Theoretical Perspective on Nonverbal Social Cue Processing in Social Anxiety. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:904.score: 18.0
    Processing of nonverbal social cues (NVSCs) is essential to interpersonal functioning and is particularly relevant to models of social anxiety. This article provides a review of the literature on NVSC processing from the perspective of social rank and affiliation biobehavioral systems, based on functional analysis of human sociality. We examine the potential of this framework for integrating cognitive, interpersonal, and evolutionary accounts of social anxiety. We argue that NVSCs are uniquely suited to rapid and effective conveyance of emotional, (...)
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  14. P. Goldin, M. Ziv, H. Jazaieri & J. J. Gross (2011). Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Versus Aerobic Exercise: Effects on the Self-Referential Brain Network in Social Anxiety Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:295-295.score: 18.0
    Background: Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is characterized by distorted self-views. The goal of this study was to examine whether Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) alters behavioral and brain measures of negative and positive self-views. Methods: 56 adult patients with generalized SAD were randomly assigned to MBSR or a comparison aerobic exercise (AE) program. A self-referential encoding task was administered at baseline and post-intervention to examine changes in behavioral and neural responses in the self-referential brain network during functional magnetic resonance imaging. (...)
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  15. Coenraad J. Hattingh, Jonathan Ipser, Sean Tromp, Supriya Syal, Christine Lochner, Samantha Jane Brooks Brooks & Dan J. Stein (2013). Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Emotion Recognition in Social Anxiety Disorder: An Activation Likelihood Meta-Analysis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:347-347.score: 18.0
    Background: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterised by abnormal fear and anxiety in social situations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a brain imaging technique that can be used to illustrate neural activation to emotionally salient stimuli. However, no attempt has yet been made to statistically collate fMRI studies of brain activation, using the activation likelihood-estimate technique, in response to emotion recognition tasks in individuals with social anxiety disorder. Methods: A systematic search of fMRI studies of neural (...)
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  16. Jana Holtmann, Maike C. Herbort, Torsten Wüstenberg, Joram Soch, Sylvia Richter, Henrik Walter, Stefan Roepke & Björn H. Schott (2013). Trait Anxiety Modulates Fronto-Limbic Processing of Emotional Interference in Borderline Personality Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Previous studies of cognitive alterations in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) have yielded conflicting results. Given that a core feature of BPD is affective instability, which is characterized by emotional hyperreactivity and deficits in emotion regulation, it seems conceivable that short-lasting emotional distress might exert temporary detrimental effects on cognitive performance. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how task-irrelevant emotional stimuli (fearful faces) affect performance and fronto-limbic neural activity patterns during attention-demanding cognitive processing in 16 female, unmedicated (...)
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  17. Nick Yeung Jason S. Moser, Tim P. Moran, Hans S. Schroder, M. Brent Donnellan (2013). On the Relationship Between Anxiety and Error Monitoring: A Meta-Analysis and Conceptual Framework. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Research involving event-related brain potentials has revealed that anxiety is associated with enhanced error monitoring, as reflected in increased amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN). The nature of the relationship between anxiety and error monitoring is unclear, however. Through meta-analysis and a critical review of the literature, we argue that anxious apprehension/worry is the dimension of anxiety most closely associated with error monitoring. Although, overall, anxiety demonstrated a robust, “small-to-medium” relationship with enhanced ERN (r = -.25), (...)
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  18. Andrew J. Calder Michael P. Ewbank, Elaine Fox (2010). The Interaction Between Gaze and Facial Expression in the Amygdala and Extended Amygdala is Modulated by Anxiety. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 18.0
    Behavioural evidence indicates that angry faces are seen as more threatening, and elicit greater anxiety, when directed at the observer, whereas the influence of gaze on the processing of fearful faces is less consistent. Recent research has also found inconsistent effects of expression and gaze direction on the amygdala response to facial signals of threat. However, such studies have failed to consider the important influence of anxiety on the response to signals of threat; an influence that is well (...)
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  19. Christian Grillon Oliver J. Robinson, Katherine Vytal, Brian R. Cornwell (2013). The Impact of Anxiety Upon Cognition: Perspectives From Human Threat of Shock Studies. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Anxiety disorders constitute a sizeable worldwide health burden with profound social and economic consequences. The symptoms are wide-ranging; from hyperarousal to difficulties with concentrating. This latter effect falls under the broad category of altered cognitive performance; in this review we examine studies quantifying such impacts of anxiety on cognition. Specifically, we focus on the translational threat of unpredictable shock paradigm, a method previously used to characterize emotional responses and defensive mechanisms that is now emerging as valuable tool for (...)
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  20. Christian Grillon Oliver J. Robinson, Marissa Krimsky (2013). The Impact of Induced Anxiety on Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Anxiety has wide reaching effects on cognition; evidenced most prominently by the ‘difficulties concentrating’ seen in anxiety disorders, and by adaptive harm-avoidant behaviors adopted under threatening circumstances. Despite having critical implications for daily-living, the precise impact of anxiety on cognition is as yet poorly quantified. Here we attempt to clarify the impact of anxiety on sustained attention and response inhibition via a translational anxiety induction in healthy individuals (N=22). Specifically, in a within-subjects design, participants completed (...)
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  21. Yael Solar Orly Rubinsten, Noam Bialik (2012). Exploring the Relationship Between Math Anxiety and Gender Through Implicit Measurement. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Math anxiety, defined as a negative affective response to mathematics, is suggested as a strong antecedent for the low visibility of women in the science and engineering workforce. However, the assumption of gender differences in math anxiety is still being studied and results are inconclusive, probably due to the use of explicit measures such as direct questionnaires. Thus, our primary objective was to investigate the effects of math anxiety on numerical processing in males and females by using (...)
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  22. Greg Hajcak Proudfit, Michael Inzlicht & Douglas Mennin (2013). Anxiety and Error Monitoring: The Importance of Motivation and Emotion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Anxiety and error monitoring: the importance of motivation and emotion.
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  23. Kieran Kingston Richard Mullen, Andrea Faull, Eleri S. Jones (2012). Attentional Focus and Performance Anxiety: Effects on Simulated Race-Driving Performance and Heart Rate Variability. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Previous studies have demonstrated that an external focus can enhance motor learning compared to an internal focus. The benefits of adopting an external focus are attributed to the use of less effortful automatic control processes, while an internal focus relies upon more effort-intensive consciously controlled processes. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a distal external focus with an internal focus in the acquisition of a simulated driving task and subsequent performance in a competitive condition designed (...)
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  24. Lars Schulze, Babette Renneberg & Janek S. Lobmaier (2013). Gaze Perception in Social Anxiety and Social Anxiety Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:872.score: 18.0
    Clinical observations suggest abnormal gaze perception to be an important indicator of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Experimental research has yet paid relatively little attention to the study of gaze perception in SAD. In this article we first discuss gaze perception in healthy human beings before reviewing self-referential and threat-related biases of gaze perception in clinical and non-clinical socially anxious samples. Relative to controls, socially anxious individuals exhibit an enhanced self-directed perception of gaze directions and demonstrate a pronounced fear of (...)
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  25. Sonja Sorg, Claus Vögele, Nadine Furka & Andrea Hans Meyer (2012). Perseverative Thinking in Depression and Anxiety. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    The current study investigated the impact of worry and brooding as moderators of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety (TMDA). We hypothesized that both types of perseverative thinking would moderate the association between negative affectivity (NA) and both anxiety and depression. Complete data sets for this questionnaire survey were obtained from 537 students. Participants’ age ranged from 16 to 49 years with a mean age of 21.1 years (SD = 3.6). Overall, results from path analyses supported the (...)
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  26. Sarah Wu, Hitha Amin, Maria Barth, Vanessa Malcarne & Vinod Menon (2012). Math Anxiety in Second and Third Graders and Its Relation to Mathematics Achievement. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Although the detrimental effects of math anxiety in adults are well understood, few studies have examined how it affects younger children who are beginning to learn math in a formal academic setting. Here, we examine the relationship between math anxiety and math achievement in 2nd and 3rd graders. In response to the need for a grade-appropriate measure of assessing math anxiety in this group we first describe the development of Scale for Early Mathematics Anxiety (SEMA), a (...)
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  27. William S. Brown (2000). Ontological Security, Existential Anxiety and Workplace Privacy. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (1):61 - 65.score: 15.0
    The relationship of workers to management has traditionally been one of control. However, the introduction of increasingly sophisticated technology as a means of supervision in the modern workplace has dramatically altered the contours of this relationship, giving workers much less privacy and making workers much more visible than previously possible. The purpose of this paper is to examine the current state of technological control of workers and how it has altered the relationship of worker to organization, through the impact upon (...)
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  28. Richard Mullen, Lew Hardy & Andrew Tattersall (2005). The Effects of Anxiety on Motor Performance: A Test of the Conscious Processing Hypothesis. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology 27 (2):212-225.score: 15.0
  29. Caroline Hunt, Edmund Keogh & Christopher C. French (2006). Anxiety Sensitivity: The Role of Conscious Awareness and Selective Attentional Bias to Physical Threat. Emotion 6 (3):418-428.score: 15.0
  30. Timothy J. Beck (2013). A Phenomenological Analysis of Anxiety as Experienced in Social Situations. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 44 (2):179-219.score: 15.0
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  31. Warren Mansell (2000). Conscious Appraisal and the Modification of Automatic Processes in Anxiety. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy 28 (2):99-120.score: 15.0
  32. Kenneth W. Spence & Janet A. Taylor (1953). The Relation of Conditioned Response Strength to Anxiety in Normal, Neurotic, and Psychotic Subjects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 45 (4):265.score: 15.0
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  33. Anna Stewart & Oriel Strickland (2013). A Companion Animal in a Work Simulation: The Roles of Task Difficulty and Prior Companion-Animal Guardianship in State Anxiety. Society and Animals 21 (3):249-265.score: 15.0
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  34. James Deese, Richard S. Lazarus & James Keenan (1953). Anxiety, Anxiety Reduction, and Stress in Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 46 (1):55.score: 15.0
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  35. Seymour Epstein & Samuel Clarke (1970). Heart Rate and Skin Conductance During Experimentally Induced Anxiety: Effects of Anticipated Intensity of Noxious Stimulation and Experience. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (1):105.score: 15.0
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  36. W. K. Estes & B. F. Skinner (1941). Some Quantitative Properties of Anxiety. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (5):390.score: 15.0
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  37. Richard S. Lazarus, James Deese & Robert Hamilton (1954). Anxiety and Stress in Learning: The Role of Intraserial Duplication. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (2):111.score: 15.0
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  38. Abram Amsel (1950). The Effect Upon Level of Consummatory Response of the Addition of Anxiety to a Motivational Complex. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (6):709.score: 15.0
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  39. Howard S. Axelrod, Emory L. Cowen & Fred Heilizer (1956). The Correlates of Manifest Anxiety in Stylus Maze Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (2):131.score: 15.0
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  40. Martin R. Baron & James P. Connor (1960). Eyelid Conditioned Responses with Various Levels of Anxiety. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (5):310.score: 15.0
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  41. Joan L. Bardach (1960). Effects of Situational Anxiety at Different Stages of Practice. Journal of Experimental Psychology 59 (6):420.score: 15.0
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  42. Sally Beel Beck (1963). Eyelid Conditioning as a Function of CS Intensity, UCS Intensity, and Manifest Anxiety Scale Score. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (5):429-438.score: 15.0
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  43. Dalbir Bindra & Lois Cameron (1953). Changes in Experimentally Produced Anxiety with the Passage of Time: Incubation Effect. Journal of Experimental Psychology 45 (3):197.score: 15.0
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  44. John G. Borkowski & Thomas Mann (1968). Effects of Anxiety and Interference on Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (2p1):352.score: 15.0
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  45. Donald F. Caldwell & Rue L. Cromwell (1959). Replication Report: The Relationship of Manifest Anxiety and Electric Shock to Eyelid Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 57 (5):348.score: 15.0
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  46. Alfred Castaneda (1961). Supplementary Report: Differential Position Habits and Anxiety in Children as Determinants of Performance in Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (3):257.score: 15.0
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  47. Vladimir Cervin (1956). Individual Behavior in Social Situations: Its Relation to Anxiety, Neuroticism, and Group Solidarity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (2):161.score: 15.0
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  48. William Z. Davidson, T. G. Andrews & Sherman Ross (1956). Effects of Stress and Anxiety on Continuous High-Speed Color Naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (1):13.score: 15.0
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  49. George E. Deane (1961). Human Heart Rate Responses During Experimentally Induced Anxiety. Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (6):489.score: 15.0
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  50. George E. Deane (1964). Human Heart Rate Responses During Experimentally Induced Anxiety: A Follow Up with Controlled Respiration. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (2):193.score: 15.0
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