Search results for 'Araminta Stone Johnston' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Araminta Stone Johnston (1993). Theory, Rationality, and Relativism. Tradition and Discovery 20 (3):16-28.score: 870.0
    This essay returns to the Azande tribe of Africa, discussed by Polanyi (in Personal Knowledge) and others, in order to rethink the issues of rationality and irrationality and of essentialism and relativism, and to consider what these issues mean in our actual lives as daily we make epistemological and moral judgements.
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  2. Araminta Stone Johnston (2009). “Thanks For Everything, Poteat!”. Tradition and Discovery 36 (2):59-63.score: 870.0
    These comments reflect upon my doctoral study with William Poteat as a nontraditional student between 1986-92 and also upon the academy and colleageality vis a vis Poteat and “Poteatians.”.
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  3. R. L. Stone (1968). Book Review:Legal System and Lawyers' Reasonings. Julius Stone. [REVIEW] Ethics 78 (4):322-.score: 180.0
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  4. Adrian Johnston (2104). Where to Start?: Robert Pippin, Slavoj Žižek, and the True Beginning(s) of Hegel’s System. Crisis and Critique 3:370-419.score: 90.0
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  5. Alison Stone (2006). Luce Irigaray and the Philosophy of Sexual Difference. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Alison Stone offers a feminist defence of the idea that sexual difference is natural, providing a new interpretation of the later philosophy of Luce Irigaray. She defends Irigaray's unique form of essentialism and her rethinking of the relationship between nature and culture, showing how Irigaray's ideas can be reconciled with Judith Butler's performative conception of gender, through rethinking sexual difference in relation to German Romantic philosophies of nature. This is the first sustained attempt to connect feminist conceptions of embodiment (...)
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  6. Alison Stone (2011). Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and Maternal Subjectivity. Routledge.score: 60.0
    In this book, Alison Stone develops a feminist approach to maternal subjectivity. Stone argues that in the West the self has often been understood in opposition to the maternal body, so that one must separate oneself from the mother and maternal care-givers on whom one depended in childhood to become a self or, in modernity, an autonomous subject. These assumptions make it difficult to be a mother and a subject, an autonomous creator of meaning. Insofar as mothers nonetheless (...)
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  7. James Scott Johnston (2011). The Dewey-Hutchins Debate: A Dispute Over Moral Teleology. Educational Theory 61 (1):1-16.score: 60.0
    In this essay, James Scott Johnston claims that a dispute over moral teleology lies at the basis of the debate between John Dewey and Robert M. Hutchins. This debate has very often been cast in terms of perennialism, classicism, or realism versus progressivism, experimentalism, or pragmatism. Unfortunately, casting the debate in these terms threatens to leave the reader with the impression that Dewey and Hutchins were simply talking past each other, that one was wrongheaded while the other correct, or (...)
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  8. Paul Johnston (1999). The Contradictions of Modern Moral Philosophy: Ethics After Wittgenstein. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The Contradictions of Modern Moral Philosophy is a highly original and radical critique of contemporary moral theory. Johnston skillfully demonstrates how much of recent moral philosophy runs aground on the issue of whether we can make correct moral judgements. His analysis begins with an insightful discussion of the divisions within moral philosophy. On one hand many philosophers deny that it is possible to make correct judgements on other peoples actions; on the other, they remain preoccupied with distinguishing between what (...)
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  9. R. J. Johnston (ed.) (1985). The Future of Geography. Methuen.score: 60.0
    INTRODUCTION: EXPLORING THE FUTURE OF GEOGRAPHY RJ Johnston Geographers, not for the first time, are undertaking a critical reappraisal of their discipline ...
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  10. Paul Johnston (1993). Wittgenstein: Rethinking the Inner. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The idea of the inner is central to our conception of a person and is at the heart of all interaction. But how should we understand this concept, and what do we mean when we wonder what is going on inside our heads? This accessible and non-technical guide to Wittgenstein provides insight into his work in this area and on the problem of the inner. Using Wittgenstein's recently published writings on the philosophy of psychology, together with unpublished material, Paul (...) presents a thorough account of a subject that was central to Wittgenstein's later work. He shows that Wittgenstein's arguments involve a radical re-thinking of our understanding of the inner and present a challenge to contemporary views which has yet to be fully appreciated or understood. Wittgenstein demonstrates how a Wittgensteinian approach can dissolve age-old problems about the nature of consciousness and the relationship between the mind, the body, and the soul. The resulting picture of the inner, with its stress on the crucial role of language, sheds light on the direction of Wittgenstein's work and presents a stimulating and controversial alternative to more fashionable positions on the subject. (shrink)
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  11. Lewis Pyenson, Sean Johnston, Alberto Martínez & Richard Staley (2011). Revisiting the History of Relativity. Metascience 20 (1):53-73.score: 60.0
    Revisiting the history of relativity Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9466-4 Authors Lewis Pyenson, Department of History, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5242, USA Sean F. Johnston, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Glasgow, Rutherford-McCowan Building, Dumfries, Glasgow, Scotland G2 0RB, UK Alberto A. Martínez, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station B7000, Austin, TX 78712-0220, USA Richard Staley, Department of the History of Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 226 Bradley Memorial Building, 1225 Linden Drive, Madison, (...)
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  12. Steve Johnston (2012). Une nouvelle traduction de la Paraphrase de Sem. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 68 (3):701-706.score: 60.0
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  13. M. W. F. Stone & Jonathan Wolff (eds.) (2000). The Proper Ambition of Science. Routledge.score: 60.0
    What is the proper relation between the scientific worldview and other parts or aspects of human knowledge and experience? Can any science aim at "complete coverage" of the world, and if it does, will it undermine--in principle or by tendency--other attempts to describe or understand the world? Should morality, theology and other areas resist or be protected from scientific treatment? Questions of this sort have been of pressing philosophical concern since antiquity. The Proper Ambition of Science presents ten particular case (...)
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  14. Lynda Stone (2011). Outliers, Cheese, and Rhizomes: Variations on a Theme of Limitation. Educational Theory 61 (6):647-658.score: 60.0
    All research has limitations, for example, from paradigm, concept, theory, tradition, and discipline. In this article Lynda Stone describes three exemplars that are variations on limitation and are “extraordinary” in that they change what constitutes future research in each domain. Malcolm Gladwell's present day study of outliers makes a statistical term into a sociological concept. Carlo Ginzburg's study of a sixteenth-century miller who challenges Church doctrine initiates the field of microhistory. Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's philosophy of the rhizome (...)
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  15. William M. Johnston (1971). Syncretist Historians of Philosophy at Vienna. Journal of the History of Ideas 32.score: 60.0
    The historical techniques of theodor gomperz, Friedrich jodl, Wilhelm jerusalem, And rudolf eisler are described. All four excelled at expositing and comparing widely divergent doctrines. Gomperz and jerusalem discussed how social practices influenced doctrines. Eisler was perhaps the most encyclopedic historian of philosophy ever. Johnston's book "the austrian mind" (berkeley, 1971) relates the four philosophers to seventy other austrian thinkers.
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  16. Christopher D. Stone (2010). Should Trees Have Standing?: Law, Morality, and the Environment. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    Originally published in 1972, Should Trees Have Standing? was a rallying point for the then burgeoning environmental movement, launching a worldwide debate on the basic nature of legal rights that reached the U.S. Supreme Court. Now, in the 35th anniversary edition of this remarkably influential book, Christopher D. Stone updates his original thesis and explores the impact his ideas have had on the courts, the academy, and society as a whole. At the heart of the book is an eminently (...)
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  17. Jeffery Aubin, Marie Chantal, Dianne M. Cole, Julio Cesar Dias Chaves, Cathelyne Duchesne, Christel Freu, Steve Johnston, Brice C. Jones, Amaury Levillayer, Stã©Phanie Machabã©E., Paul-Hubert Poirier, Philippe Therrien, Jonathan I. von Kodar, Martin Voyer & Jennifer K. Wees (2013). Littérature et histoire du christianisme ancien. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 69 (2):327-402.score: 60.0
    Jeffery Aubin ,Marie Chantal ,Dianne Cole ,Julio Chaves ,Cathelyne Duchesne ,Christel Freu ,Steve Johnston ,Brice Jones ,Amaury Levillayer ,Stéphanie Machabée ,Paul-Hubert Poirier ,Philippe Therrien ,Jonathan von Kodar ,Martin Voyer ,Jennifer Wees ,Eric Crégheur.
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  18. Mark Johnston, The Manifest: Chapter.score: 30.0
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  19. Mark Johnston (1987). Human Beings. Journal of Philosophy 84 (February):59-83.score: 30.0
  20. Jim Stone (1984). Dreaming and Certainty. Philosophical Studies 45 (May):353-368.score: 30.0
    I argue that being wide awake is an epistemic virtue which enables me to recognize immediately that I'm wide awake. Also I argue that dreams are imaginings and that the wide awake mind can immediately discern the difference between imaginings and vivid sense experience. Descartes need only pinch himself.
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  21. Jim Stone (1993). Cogito Ergo Sum. Journal of Philosophy 60 (9):462-468.score: 30.0
  22. Mark Johnston (2004). The Obscure Object of Hallucination. Philosophical Studies 120 (1-3):113-83.score: 30.0
    Like dreaming, hallucination has been a formative trope for modern philosophy. The vivid, often tragic, breakdown in the mind’s apparent capacity to disclose reality has long served to support a paradoxical philosophical picture of sensory experience. This picture, which of late has shaped the paradigmatic empirical understanding the senses, displays sensory acts as already complete without the external world; complete in that the direct objects even of veridical sensory acts do not transcend what we could anyway hallucinate. Hallucination is thus (...)
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  23. Mark Johnston (2006). Hylomorphism. Journal of Philosophy 103 (12):652-698.score: 30.0
  24. Mark Johnston (2006). Better Than Mere Knowledge? The Function of Sensory Awareness. In T.S. Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Perceptual Experience. Oxford University Press. 260--290.score: 30.0
  25. Mark Johnston (2007). Objective Mind and the Objectivity of Our Minds. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):233–268.score: 30.0
  26. Mark Johnston (1992). Constitution is Not Identity. Mind 101 (401):89-106.score: 30.0
  27. Jim Stone (2005). Why There Still Are No People. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):174-191.score: 30.0
    This paper argues that there are no people. If identity isn't what matters in survival, psychological connectedness isn't what matters either. Further, fissioning cases do not support the claim that connectedness is what matters. I consider Peter Unger's view that what matters is a continuous physical realization of a core psychology. I conclude that if identity isn't what matters in survival, nothing matters. This conclusion is deployed to argue that there are no people. Objections to Eliminativism are considered, especially that (...)
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  28. Jim Stone (2001). A Theory of Religion Revised. Religious Studies 37 (2):177-189.score: 30.0
    A (revised) account of what all and only religions have in common in virtue of which they are religions.
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  29. Jim Stone (2007). Persons Are Not Made of Temporal Parts. Analysis 67 (1):7–11.score: 30.0
  30. Mark Johnston (1997). Manifest Kinds. Journal of Philosophy 94 (11):564-583.score: 30.0
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  31. Mark Johnston (1992). How to Speak of the Colors. Philosophical Studies 68 (3):221-263.score: 30.0
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  32. Mark Johnston (2001). The Authority of Affect. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):181-214.score: 30.0
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  33. Jim Stone (2007). Contextualism and Warranted Assertion. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):92–113.score: 30.0
    Contextualists offer "high-low standards" practical cases to show that a variety of knowledge standards are in play in different ordinary contexts. These cases show nothing of the sort, I maintain. However Keith DeRose gives an ingenious argument that standards for knowledge do go up in high-stakes cases. According to the knowledge account of assertion (Kn), only knowledge warrants assertion. Kn combined with the context sensitivity of assertability yields contextualism about knowledge. But is Kn correct? I offer a rival account of (...)
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  34. Mark Johnston (1992). Reasons and Reductionism. Philosophical Review 3 (3):589-618.score: 30.0
  35. Jim Stone (1981). Hume on Identity: A Defense. Philosophical Studies 40 (2):275 - 282.score: 30.0
  36. Jim Stone (2007). Pascal's Wager and the Persistent Vegetative State. Bioethics 21 (2):84–92.score: 30.0
    I argue that a version of Pascal's Wager applies to the persistent vegetative state with sufficient force that it ought to part of advance directives.
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  37. Mark Johnston (2004). Subjectivism and Unmasking. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (1):187-201.score: 30.0
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  38. Jim Stone (1998). Free Will as a Gift From God: A New Compatibilism. Philosophical Studies 92 (3):257-81.score: 30.0
    I argue that God could give us the robust power to do other than we do in a deterministic universe.
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  39. Jim Stone (1988). Parfit and the Buddha: Why There Are No People. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (March):519-32.score: 30.0
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  40. Jim Stone (1994). Advance Directives, Autonomy and Unintended Death. Bioethics 8 (3):223–246.score: 30.0
    Advance directives typically have two defects. First, most advance directives fail to enable people to effectively avoid unwanted medical intervention. Second, most of them have the potential of ending your life in ways you never intended, years before you had to die.
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  41. Mark Johnston, It Necessarily Ain't So.score: 30.0
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  42. Mark Johnston (1996). Is the External World Invisible? Philosophical Issues 7:185-198.score: 30.0
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  43. Jim Stone (2000). Skepticism as a Theory of Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):527-545.score: 30.0
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  44. Jim Stone Stone (2005). Why There Are Still No People. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70.score: 30.0
  45. Jim Stone (2003). On Staying the Same. Analysis 63 (4):288–291.score: 30.0
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  46. Mark Johnston (1989). Fission and the Facts. Philosophical Perspectives 3:369-97.score: 30.0
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  47. Mark Johnston (1996). A Mind-Body Problem at the Surface of Objects. Philosophical Issues 7:219-229.score: 30.0
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  48. Jim Stone (2009). Trumping the Causal Influence Account of Causation. Philosophical Studies 142 (2):153 - 160.score: 30.0
    Here is a simple counterexample to David Lewis’s causal influence account of causation, one that is especially illuminating due to its connection to what Lewis himself writes: it is a variant of his trumping example.
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  49. Jim Stone (1989). Anselm's Proof. Philosophical Studies 57 (1):79 - 94.score: 30.0
  50. Mark Johnston (2001). Is Affect Always Mere Effect? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):225-228.score: 30.0
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