Search results for 'Archaeology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marcia-Anne Dobres & John E. Robb (eds.) (2000). Agency in Archaeology. Routledge.score: 27.0
    Agency in Archaeology is the first critical volume to scrutinize the concept of agency and to examine in-depth its potential to inform our understanding of the past. Theories of agency recognize that human beings make choices, hold intentions and take action. This offers archaeologists scope to move beyond looking at the broad structural or environmental change and instead to consider the individual and the group. The book brings together nineteen internationally renowned scholars who have very different, and often conflicting, (...)
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  2. Ben Jeffares (2003). The Scope and Limits of Biological Explanations in Archaeology. Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellingtonscore: 24.0
    I show how archaeologists have two problems. The construction of scenarios accounting for the raw data of Archaeology, the material remains of the past, and the explanation of pre-history. Within Archaeology, there has been an ongoing debate about how to constrain speculation within both of these archaeological projects, and archaeologists have consistently looked to biological mechanisms for constraints. I demonstrate the problems of using biology, either as an analogy for cultural processes or through direct application of biological principles (...)
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  3. Ian Hodder (ed.) (1995). Interpreting Archaeology: Finding Meaning in the Past. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Interpretive Archaeologies provides a forum for debate between varied approaches to studying the past. It reflects the profound shift in the direction of archaeological study in the last fifteen years. The book argues that archaeologists must understand their own subjective approaches to the material they study as well as recognize how past researchers imposed their value systems on the evidence they presented. The book's authors, drawn from Europe, North America, Asia and Australasia, represent many different strands of archaeology. They (...)
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  4. Ian Bapty & Tim Yates (eds.) (1990). Archaeology After Structuralism: Post-Structuralism and the Practice of Archaeology. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Introduction: Archaeology and Post-Structuralism Ian Bapty and Tim Yates i If it recedes one day, leaving behind its works and signs on the shores of our ...
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  5. Colin Koopman (2008). Foucault's Historiographical Expansion: Adding Genealogy to Archaeology. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):338-362.score: 24.0
    This paper offers a rereading of Foucault's much-disputed mid-career historiographical shift to genealogy from his earlier archaeological analytic. Disputing the usual view that this shift involves an abandonment of an archaeological method that was then replaced by a genealogical method, I show that this shift is better conceived as a historiographical expansion. Foucault's work subsequent to this shift should be understood as invoking both genealogy and archaeology. The metaphor of expansion is helpful in clarifying what was involved in Foucault's (...)
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  6. Ian Hodder (ed.) (1987). The Archaeology of Contextual Meanings. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This companion volume to Archaeology as Long-term History focuses on the symbolism of artefacts. It seeks at once to refine current theory and method relating to interpretation and show, with examples, how to conduct this sort of archaeological work. Some contributors work with the material culture of modern times or the historic period, areas in which the symbolism of mute artefacts has traditionally been thought most accessible. However, the book also contains a good number of applications in prehistory to (...)
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  7. Julian Thomas (1996). Time, Culture, and Identity: An Interpretative Archaeology. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This groundbreaking work considers one of the central themes of archaeology, time, which until recently has been taken for granted. It considers how time is used and perceived by archaeology and also how time influences the construction of identities. The book presents case studies, eg, transition from hunter gather to farming in early Neolithic, to examine temporality and identity. Drawing upon the work of Martin Heidegger, Thomas develops a way of writing about the past in which time is (...)
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  8. Roberta Gilchrist (1999). Gender and Archaeology: Contesting the Past. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Is gender determined by biology, society or experience? How have notions of gender and sexuality differed in past societies? Addressing such questions, Gender and Archaeology is the first critical introduction to the field of gender archaeology as it has evolved over the last two decades. It examines the impact of feminist perspectives on archaeology and shows the unique insights that gender archaeology offers on topics like the sexual division of labor, issues of sexuality, and the embodiment (...)
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  9. Thomas Wynn (2002). Archaeology and Cognitive Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):389-402.score: 24.0
    Archaeology can provide two bodies of information relevant to the understanding of the evolution of human cognition – the timing of developments, and the evolutionary context of these developments. The challenge is methodological. Archaeology must document attributes that have direct implications for underlying cognitive mechanisms. One example of such a cognitive archaeology is found in spatial cognition. The archaeological record documents an evolutionary sequence that begins with ape-equivalent spatial abilities 2.5 million years ago and ends with the (...)
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  10. Valerie Pinsky & Alison Wylie (eds.) (1989). Critical Traditions in Contemporary Archaeology: Essays in the Philosophy, History, and Socio-Politics of Archaeology. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    EDITORS' INTRODUCTION Perhaps the single most broadly unifying feature of the early new archaeology was the demand that archaeologists not take the aims and ...
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  11. Robert Hahn (2010). Archaeology and the Origins of Philosophy. State University of New York Press.score: 24.0
    Part I: Archaeology and Anaximander's cosmic picture : an historical narrative -- Anaximander, architectural historian of the cosmos -- Why did Anaximander write a prose book rationalizing the cosmos? -- A survey of the key techniques that Anaximander observed at the architects building sites -- An imaginative visit to an ancient Greek building site -- Anaximander's cosmic picture : the size and shape of the earth -- The doxographical reports -- The scholarly debates over the text and its interpretations (...)
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  12. Ian Russell (ed.) (2006). Images, Representations and Heritage: Moving Beyond Modern Approaches to Archaeology. Springer.score: 24.0
    Recent archaeological theory has show that images of the past have carried a particularly strong resonance within modern social groups. This volume explores the immeasurable impact that the phenomenon of archaeology has had on the representation of the past in the modern world. Modern society’s ‘archaeological imagination’ conceives of archaeology as a producer of images of the past which become representations of modern group identities. If archaeology is utilized by public groups to construct and represent identities, then (...)
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  13. Julian Thomas (2004). Archaeology and Modernity. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This is the first book-length study to explore the relationship between archaeology and modern thought, showing how philosophical ideas that developed in the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries still dominate our approach to the material remains of ancient societies. It discusses the modern emphasis on method rather than ethics or meaning, our understanding of change in history and nature, the role of the nation-state in forming our views of the past, and contemporary notions of human individuality, the mind, and materiality. (...)
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  14. Terry L. Hunt, Carl P. Lipo & Sarah L. Sterling (eds.) (2001). Posing Questions for a Scientific Archaeology. Bergin & Garvey.score: 24.0
    This volume addresses the need to describe the world so that archaeology can have theory built as historical science.
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  15. Luke Lavan & William Bowden (eds.) (2003). Theory and Practice in Late Antique Archaeology. Brill.score: 24.0
    This volume explores the theoretical frameworks, methodology and field practice suited to late antique archaeology.
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  16. Michael Shanks (1987). Re-Constructing Archaeology: Theory and Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    INTRODUCTION The doctrines and values of the 'new' archaeology are in the process of being broken down; for many they were never acceptable. ...
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  17. Alfredo González Ruibal (ed.) (2013). Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity. Routledge.score: 24.0
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  18. Ryan Hurd (2011). Integral Archaeology: Process Methodologies for Exploring Prehistoric Rock Art on Ometepe Island, Nicaragua. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):72-94.score: 24.0
    A process-based approach to archaeology combines traditional third-person data collection methods with first- and second-person inquiries. Drawing from the traditions of cognitive archaeology, transpersonal psychology, and ecopsychology, this mixed-methods approach can be thought of as a movement toward a more holistic or “integral” archaeology. By way of example, a prehistoric rock art site on Ometepe Island, Nicaragua is explored from the inside (through the researcher's lucid dreaming incubations) as well as in relationship with the researcher's embodied presence (...)
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  19. Julian Thomas (ed.) (2000). Interpretive Archaeology: A Reader. Leicester University Press.score: 24.0
    This volume gathers together a series of the canonical statements which have defined an interpretive archaeology. Many of these have been unavailable for some while, and others are drawn from inaccessible publications.
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  20. Alison Wylie (1999). Science, Conservation, and Stewardship: Evolving Codes of Conduct in Archaeology. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (3):319-336.score: 24.0
    The Society for American Archaeology (SAA) has developed an extensive body of ethics guidelines for its members, most actively in the last two decades. This coincides with the period in which the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has taken a strong stand on the need for its affiliates to develop clear. enforceable codes of conduct. The ethics guidelines instituted by the SAA now realize the central recommendations of the AAAS, and in this they illustrate both the (...)
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  21. Geoffrey Scarre & Robin Coningham (eds.) (2012). Appropriating the Past: Philosophical Perspectives on the Practice of Archaeology. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction Geoffrey Scarre and Robin Coningham; Part I. Claiming the Past: 2. The values of the past James O. Young; 3. Whose past? archaeological knowledge, community knowledge, and the embracing of conflict Piotr Bienkowski; 4. The past people want: heritage for the majority? Cornelius Holtorf; 5. The ethics of repatriation: rights of possession and duties of respect Janna Thompson; 6. On archaeological ethics and letting go Larry J. Zimmerman; 7. Hintang and the dilemma of benevolence: (...)
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  22. Alison Wylic (1999). Science, Conservation, and Stewardship: Evolving Codes of Conduct in Archaeology. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (3):319-336.score: 24.0
    The Society for American Archaeology (SAA) has developed an extensive body of ethics guidelines for its members, most actively in the last two decades. This coincides with the period in which the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has taken a strong stand on the need for its affiliates to develop clear. enforceable codes of conduct. The ethics guidelines instituted by the SAA now realize the central recommendations of the AAAS, and in this they illustrate both the (...)
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  23. William L. Rathje, Michael Shanks, Christopher Witmore & Susan E. Alcock (eds.) (2013). Archaeology in the Making: Conversations Through a Discipline. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This book comprises conversations about archaeology among some of its notable contemporary figures.
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  24. William H. Krieger (forthcoming). Marketing Archaeology. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.score: 22.0
    In the 19th century, ‘scientific archaeologists’ split from their antiquarian colleagues over the role that provenience (context) plays in the value of an artifact. These archaeologists focus on documenting an artifact’s context when they remove it from its original location. Archaeologists then use this contextual information to place these artifacts within a particular larger assemblage, in a particular time and space. Once analyzed, the artifacts found in a site or region can be used to document, to understand, and explain the (...)
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  25. Anton Killin (2014). Musicality in Human Evolution, Archaeology and Ethnography. Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):597-609.score: 22.0
    This essay reviews Iain Morley’s The Prehistory of Music, an up-to-date and authoritative overview of recent research on evolution and cognition of musicality from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. Given the diversity of the project explored, integration of evidence from multiple fields is particularly pressing, required for any novel evolutionary account to be persuasive, and for the project’s continued progress. Moreover, Morley convincingly demonstrates that there is much more to understanding musicality than is supposed by some theorists. I outline Morley’s review of (...)
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  26. Ian Hodder (2003). Reading the Past: Current Approaches to Interpretation in Archaeology. Cambridge University Press.score: 22.0
    The third edition of this classic introduction to archaeological theory and method has been fully updated to address the rapid development of theoretical debate throughout the discipline. Ian Hodder and Scott Hutson argue that archaeologists must consider a variety of perspectives in the complex and uncertain task of "translating the meaning of past texts into their own contemporary language". While remaining centered on the importance of meaning, agency and history, the authors explore the latest developments in post-structuralism, neo-evolutionary theory and (...)
     
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  27. Marcia-Anne Dobres (2000). Technology and Social Agency: Outlining a Practice Framework for Archaeology. Blackwell Publishers.score: 21.0
  28. J. L. Bintliff & C. F. Gaffney (eds.) (1986). Archaeology at the Interface: Studies in Archaeology's Relationships with History, Geography, Biology, and Physical Science. B.A.R..score: 21.0
     
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  29. Lewis Roberts Binford (1983). Working at Archaeology. Academic Press.score: 21.0
  30. Christine Finn (2001). Outside Archaeology: Material Culture and Poetic Imagination. British Archaeological Reports.score: 21.0
  31. Jean Claude Gardin (1980). Archaeological Constructs: An Aspect of Theoretical Archaeology. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
  32. Guy E. Gibbon (1989). Explanation in Archaeology. Blackwell.score: 21.0
     
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  33. Robert J. Jeske & Douglas K. Charles (eds.) (2003). Theory, Method, and Practice in Modern Archaeology. Praeger.score: 21.0
  34. Håkan Karlsson (1998). Re-Thinking Archaeology. Göteborg University, Dept. Of Archaeology.score: 21.0
  35. Peter Kosso (2001). Knowing the Past: Philosophical Issues of History and Archaeology. Humanity Books.score: 21.0
  36. George Nash & George Children (eds.) (2008). The Archaeology of Semiotics and the Social Order of Things. Archaeopress.score: 21.0
     
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  37. William L. Rathje, Michael Shanks, Christopher Witmore & Susan E. Alcock (eds.) (2012). Archaeology in the Making: Conversations Through a Discipline with Susan E. Alcock [Et Al.]. Routledge.score: 21.0
     
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  38. Merrilee H. Salmon (1982). Philosophy and Archaeology. Academic Press.score: 21.0
     
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  39. Michael Shanks (1987/1988). Social Theory and Archaeology. University of New Mexico Press.score: 21.0
  40. Christopher Y. Tilley (ed.) (1993). Interpretative Archaeology. Berg.score: 21.0
    This fascinating volume integrates recent developments in anthropological and sociological theory with a series of detailed studies of prehistoric material culture. The authors explore the manner in which semiotic, hermeneutic, Marxist, and post-structuralist approaches radically alter our understanding of the past, and provide a series of innovative studies of key areas of interest to archaeologists and anthropologists.
     
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  41. Gary Gutting (1989). Michel Foucault's Archaeology of Scientific Reason. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This is an important introduction to and critical interpretation of the work of the major French thinker, Michel Foucault. Through comprehensive and detailed analyses of such important texts as The History of Madness in the Age of Reason, The Birth of the Clinic, The Order of Things, and The Archaeology of Knowledge, the author provides a lucid exposition of Foucault's "archaeological" approach to the history of thought, a method for uncovering the "unconscious" structures that set boundaries on the thinking (...)
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  42. Ben Jeffares (2002). The Explanatory Limits of Cognitive Archaeology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):410-412.score: 18.0
    I make two claims about cognitive archaeology. I question its role, seeing psychology as yet another contributor to the archaeological tool-kit rather than as something unique. I then suggest that cognitive archaeology is not in a position to provide evolutionary contexts without other disciplines. As a consequence it cannot deliver on the provision of evolutionary contexts for cognitive evolution.
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  43. Kai Horsthemke (2011). 'Diverse Epistemologies', Truth and Archaeology: In Defence of Realism. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):321-334.score: 18.0
    In a recent journal article, as well as in a recent book chapter, in which she critiques my position on ‘indigenous knowledge’, Lesley Green of the Department of Social Anthropology at the University of Cape Town argues that ‘diverse epistemologies ought to be evaluated not on their capacity to express a strict realism but on their ability to advance understanding’. In order to examine the implications of Green’s arguments, and of Nelson Goodman and Catherine Elgin’s work in this regard, I (...)
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  44. Cameron Shelley (1999). Multiple Analogies in Archaeology. Philosophy of Science 66 (4):579-605.score: 18.0
    Analogies have always had an important place in the reconstruction of past cultures by archaeologists. However, archaeologists and philosophers have objected on various grounds to the importance granted to analogy. Heider proposed the use of multiple analogies--analogies incorporating several sources--as a way of overcoming these objections. However, the merits and even the meaning of this proposal have not been explored adequately. This article presents an examination of instances of multiple analogies in the archaeological literature in order to motivate an adequate (...)
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  45. Valerie E. Stone (2002). Footloose and Fossil-Free No More: Evolutionary Psychology Needs Archaeology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):420-421.score: 18.0
    Evolutionary theories of human cognition should refer to specific times in the primate or hominid past. Though alternative accounts of tool manufacture from Wynn's are possible (e.g., frontal lobe function), Wynn demonstrates the power of archaeology to guide cognitive theories. Many cognitive abilities evolved not in the “Pleistocene hunter-gatherer” context, but earlier, in the context of other patterns of social organization and foraging.
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  46. C. Allibert (2008). Austronesian Migration and the Establishment of the Malagasy Civilization: Contrasted Readings in Linguistics, Archaeology, Genetics and Cultural Anthropology. Diogenes 55 (2):7 - 16.score: 18.0
    This article reviews and contrasts research findings in a variety of disciplines seeking corroboration for theories of settlement in Madagascar. Evidence is considered from the fields of linguistics, archaeology (studies of pottery), cultural anthropology and genetic analysis, leading to conclusions broadly supporting the thesis of Austronesian migrations directly to Madagascar from Kalimantan and Sulawesi around the 5th and 7th centuries CE, which combined with a Bantu group originating from the region of Mozambique. The article nevertheless warns against attributing too (...)
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  47. Robert N. McCauley, Cognition, Religious Ritual, and Archaeology.score: 18.0
    The emergence of cognitive science over the past thirty years has stimulated new approaches to traditional problems and materials in well-established disciplines. Those approaches have generated new insights and reinvigorated aspirations for theories in the sciences of the socio-cultural (about the structures and uses of symbols and the cognitive processes underlying them) that are both more systematic and more accountable empirically than the recently available alternatives. Without rejecting interpretive proposals, projects in both the cognitive science of religion and in cognitive (...)
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  48. Eva Vakirtzi & Phil Bayliss (2012). Towards a Foucauldian Methodology in the Study of Autism: Issues of Archaeology, Genealogy, and Subjectification. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (4):364-378.score: 18.0
    The remarkable increase in diagnoses of autism has paralleled an increase in scientific research and turned the syndrome into a kind of a new ‘trend’ within psychiatric and developmental conditions of childhood. At the same time, discursive technologies, such as DSM-IV, autobiographies, movies, fiction, etc., together with ‘educational’ interventions, such as TEACCH, PECS, Makaton, etc., seem to anticipate a form of an apparatus built around the condition named autism. Starting from this premise, the article proposes a new approach within autism (...)
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  49. Dawid Kobiałka (2013). Archaeology, Cinema and Ideology: A Case Study of How to Train Your Dragon (2010). International Journal of Žižek Studies 7.score: 18.0
    Archaeologists have been interested in Hollywood films for a few decades. What basically interested them was the theme of how cinema misperceives the practice of archaeology and its object of study (the past). In this paper I focus on How to Train Your Dragon (2010), 3-D animated film about Vikings for children. A film is always already a meta-film. Every film is, to use Hegelian distinction, a story in itself, presents more or less coherent story. At the same time, (...)
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  50. Dietmar Schmidt & tr Gledhill, Andrew (2001). Refuse Archaeology: Virchow--Schliemann--Freud. Perspectives on Science 9 (2):210-232.score: 18.0
    : In the early twentieth century, psychoanalysis tries to investigate a specific logic of the appearance and the incident of what is taken to be unintended in everyday communication and human behavior. What before hardly seemed to be worth systematic research, now becomes a privileged field, in which the meaningful signs of a hidden and unwelcome past appear. For representing this new field of research Freud often makes use of archaeological metaphors. But in quoting the knowledge and the techniques of (...)
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