Search results for 'Arhat Virdi' (try it on Scholar)

7 found
Sort by:
  1. Arhat Virdi (2009). Argument Praćke, Gödelovo Oklijevanje I Tarskijevska Semantika. Prolegomena: Časopis Za Filozofiju 8 (2):233-241.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jaipreet Virdi (2010). Learning From Artifacts: A Review of the “Reading Artifacts: Summer Institute in the Material Culture of Science,” Presented by The Canada Science and Technology Museum and Situating Science Cluster. [REVIEW] Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):276-279.score: 30.0
    Describing how the study of artifacts is greatly enhanced by an understanding of the history of museums, Ken Arnold remarks that there is “an implicit faith in the power of objects to tell, or at least ask, historians things that the written word alone cannot” (1999, p. 145). Rather than remaining mute objects or passive accessories to textual descriptions, artifacts (and the museums that house them) are tangible incarnations of the culture from which they emerged, providing unique information on the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jaipreet Virdi (2009). Bridging the Knowledge Gap: Examining Potential Limits in Nanomedicine. Spontaneous Generations: A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science 2 (1):25.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jaipreet Virdi (2009). Fritz Allhoff and Patrick Lin, Eds. Nanotechnology and Society: Current and Emerging Ethical Issues. Spontaneous Generations: A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science 2 (1):248.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jonathan A. Silk (2007). Good and Evil in Indian Buddhism: The Five Sins of Immediate Retribution. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (3):253-286.score: 3.0
    Indian Buddhist sources speak of five sins of immediate retribution: murder of mother, father, an arhat, drawing the blood of a buddha, and creating a schism in the monastic community. This category provides the paradigm for sinfulness in Buddhism. Yet even these sins can and will, be expiated in the long run, demonstrating the overwhelmingly positive nature of Buddhist ethics.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ryūhō Ōkawa (2005). The Philosophy of Progress: Higher Thinking for Developing Infinite Prosperity. Lantern Books.score: 3.0
    What is wealth? -- Looking at the world from God's perspective -- Changing your attitude to bring success -- Suffering caused by desire -- Accumulating beneficial wealth -- Making progress with love and ideals -- Creating "utopian economics" -- The path to progress -- The definition of progress -- The joy of progress -- The driving force of progress -- Realizing hope -- A life filled with light -- Living with optimism -- Living lightheartedly -- Believing tomorrow will be better (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Dario Sacchini, Andrea Virdis, Pietro Refolo, Maddalena Pennacchini & Ignacio Carrasco de Paula (2009). Health Technology Assessment (HTA): Ethical Aspects. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):453-457.score: 1.0
    “HTA is a multidisciplinary process that summarizes information about the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related to the use of a health technology in a systematic, transparent, unbiased, robust manner. Its aim is to inform the formulation of safe, effective, health policies that are patient focused, and seek to achieve best value” (EUnetHTA 2007). Even though the assessment of ethical aspects of a health technology is listed as one of the objectives of a HTA process, in practice, the integration (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation