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Ari R. Joffe [5]Ari Joffe [3]
  1. Ari R. Joffe, Meredith Bara, Natalie Anton & Nathan Nobis (2015). Expectations for Methodology and Translation of Animal Research: A Survey of Health Care Workers. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):29.
    Health care workers often perform, promote, and advocate use of public funds for animal research ; therefore, an awareness of the empirical costs and benefits of animal research is an important issue for HCW. We aim to determine what health-care-workers consider should be acceptable standards of AR methodology and translation rate to humans.
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  2. Ari R. Joffe, Meredith Bara, Natalie Anton & Nathan Nobis (2014). The Ethics of Animal Research: A Survey of Pediatric Health Care Workers. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):20.
    Pediatric health care workers often perform, promote, and advocate use of public funds for animal research . We aim to determine whether HCW consider common arguments in support of AR convincing.
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  3. Ari R. Joffe (2013). Back to Basics About Organ Donation. Hastings Center Report 43 (5):6-7.
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  4. Ari Joffe, Joe Carcillo, Natalie Anton, Allan deCaen, Yong Han, Michael Bell, Frank Maffei, John Sullivan, James Thomas & Gonzalo Garcia-Guerra (2011). Donation After Cardiocirculatory Death: A Call for a Moratorium Pending Full Public Disclosure and Fully Informed Consent. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6 (1):17-.
    Many believe that the ethical problems of donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD) have been "worked out" and that it is unclear why DCD should be resisted. In this paper we will argue that DCD donors may not yet be dead, and therefore that organ donation during DCD may violate the dead donor rule. We first present a description of the process of DCD and the standard ethical rationale for the practice. We then present our concerns with DCD, including the following: (...)
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  5. Ari Joffe (2010). Are Recent Defences of the Brain Death Concept Adequate? Bioethics 24 (2):47-53.
    Brain death is accepted in most countries as death. The rationales to explain why brain death is death are surprisingly problematic. The standard rationale that in brain death there has been loss of integrative unity of the organism has been shown to be false, and a better rationale has not been clearly articulated. Recent expert defences of the brain death concept are examined in this paper, and are suggested to be inadequate. I argue that, ironically, these defences demonstrate the lack (...)
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  6. Colleen Gresiuk & Ari Joffe (2009). Variability in the Pediatric Intensivists' Threshold for Withdrawal/Limitation of Life Support as Perceived by Bedside Nurses. Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (4):316.
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  7. Ari R. Joffe (2007). The Ethics of Donation and Transplantation: Are Definitions of Death Being Distorted for Organ Transplantation? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):28.
    A recent commentary defends 1) the concept of 'brain arrest' to explain what brain death is, and 2) the concept that death occurs at 2–5 minutes after absent circulation. I suggest that both these claims are flawed. Brain arrest is said to threaten life, and lead to death by causing a secondary respiratory then cardiac arrest. It is further claimed that ventilation only interrupts this way that brain arrest leads to death. These statements imply that brain arrest is not death (...)
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  8. Ari R. Joffe (2007). Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:28.
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