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  1. Arlene Judith Klotzko (2004). A Clone of Your Own?: The Science and Ethics of Cloning. Oxford University Press.
    Someday soon (if it hasn't happened in secret already), a human will be cloned, and mankind will embark on a scientific and moral journey whose destination cannot be foretold. In Copycats: The Science and Ethics of Cloning, Arlene Judith Klotzko describes the new world of possibilities that can be glimpsed over the horizon. In a lucid and engaging narrative, she explains that the technology to create clones of living beings already exists, inaugurated in 1996 by Dolly the sheep, the first (...)
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  2. Arlene Judith Klotzko & Peter Singer (1999). Learning From Henry Spira. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (01):3-5.
    For a very long time, the scientific and animal welfare communities have faced each other across a seemingly unbridgeable divide. Each side tends to view the other in simplistic and distorted terms. Animal welfare advocates see scientists as, at worst, sadists who enjoy torturing animals, and at best, as self-interested careerists intent on building careers out of publishing more papers and getting more grants, irrespective of the cost to animals. Scientists committed to research see the animal movement as consisting of, (...)
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  3. Arlene Judith Klotzko (1998). Dolly, Cloning, and the Public Misunderstanding of Science: A Challenge for Us All. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):115-116.
    It has become a commonplace to observe that the people of the world will soon be divided into two classesfor everyone else—how much worse it would be if we made a slight alteration in our description. How much worse it would be if the vast majority of people were possessed of too little information to allow them to make informed decisions about their own lives, health, and genetic inheritance. Unfortunately, this is the reality. And as scientific advances rocket far ahead (...)
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  4. Arlene Judith Klotzko (1998). Voices From Roslin: The Creators of Dolly Discuss Science, Ethics, and Social Responsibility. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):121-140.
    Dolly, as we all know, is a sheep. And a very remarkable sheep. Not because of what she is, but because of the mode by which she appeared in our midst. Dolly was cloned in a laboratory by a technique called nuclear transfer; she is virtually genetically identical to a sheep born six years before she was. And wewill never be the same again.
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  5. Arlene Judith Klotzko (1998). Medical Miracle or Medical Mischief?: The Saga of the McCaughey Septuplets. Hastings Center Report 28 (3):5-8.
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  6. Arlene Judith Klotzko (1997). What Kind of Life? What Kind of Death? An Interview with Dr. Henk Prins. Bioethics 11 (1):24–42.
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  7. Arlene Judith Klotzko & Dr Boudewijn (1995). Chahot Discuss Assisted Suicide in the Absence of Somatic Illness. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4:239-249.
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  8. Frederick H. Lowy, Mary A. Paterson, Francesco de Martis, Arlene Judith Klotzko & Birgit Friedl (1995). Ethics Committees at Work: Immortality Through the Fertility Clinic. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (03):375-.
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  9. Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Nancy S. Jecker, Christine Rozance, Arlene Judith Klotzko & Birgit Friedl (1995). Ethics Committees at Work: A Different Kind of “Prisoner's Dilemma”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (04):530-.