Search results for 'Arne Weber' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Arne Weber (Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf)
  1. Arne M. Weber & Gottfried Vosgerau (2012). Grounding Action Representations. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):53-69.score: 240.0
    In this paper we discuss an approach called grounded action cognition, which aims to provide a theory of the interdependencies between motor control and action-related cognitive processes, like perceiving an action or thinking about an action. The theory contrasts with traditional views in cognitive science in that it motivates an understanding of cognition as embodied, through application of Barsalou’s general idea of grounded cognition. To guide further research towards an appropriate theory of grounded action cognition we distinguish between grounding qua (...)
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  2. Karsten Weber, Uta Bittner, Arne Manzeschke, Elisabeth Rother, Friedericke Quack, Kathrin Dengler & Heiner Fangerau (2012). Taking Patient Privacy and Autonomy More Seriously: Why an Orwellian Account Is Not Sufficient. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):51-53.score: 240.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 9, Page 51-53, September 2012.
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  3. Markus Seidel & Arne Weber (2010). Trivial, Platitudinous, Boring? Searle on Conceptual Relativism. In Dirk Franken, Attila Karakus & Jan Michel (eds.), John R. Searle. Thinking About the Real World. Ontos.score: 240.0
    In this paper we explore Searle’s defense of conceptual relativism. It emerges that Searle formulates the thesis in many different ways and that contrary to his contention not all are trivial and platitudinous. Specifically he does not distinguish clearly between an ontological and a linguistic version of conceptual relativism as well as between weak difference and stronger incommensurability of conceptual schemes. This has consequences for Searle’s defense of external realism.
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  4. Max Weber (1994). Weber: Political Writings. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    Max Weber (1864-1920), generally known as a founder of modern social science, was concerned with political affairs throughout his life. The texts in this edition span his career and include his early inaugural lecture The Nation State and Economic Policy, Suffrage and Democracy in Germany, Parliament and Government in Germany under a New Political Order, Socialism, The Profession and Vocation of Politics, and an excerpt from his essay The Situation of Constitutional Democracy in Russia, as well as other shorter (...)
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  5. George E. McCarthy, Hannah Arendt, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Jurgen Habermas, Martin Heidegger, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche & Max Weber (1997). Romancing Antiquity: German Critique of the Enlightenment From Weber to Habermas. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 180.0
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  6. J. Gittleman, Max Weber, B. Nelson & D. Nelson (1971). Max Weber on Race and Society. Social Research 38 (1):30.score: 180.0
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  7. Hans Peter Weber (2006). [Kultur des Kreaturalen Denkens] / Nju Skul [Hans Peter Weber]. Sine Causa Verlag.score: 180.0
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  8. Max Weber & Stephen Kalberg (eds.) (2005). Max Weber: Readings and Commentary on Modernity. Blackwell Pub..score: 180.0
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  9. M. Weber, E. Traverso & J. Bidet (1992). Max Weber. Sur le socialisme et le marxisme. Actuel Marx 11:41-65.score: 180.0
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  10. William Weber (2008). Canonicity and Collegiality “Other” Composers, 1790 – 1850. Common Knowledge 14 (1):105-123.score: 120.0
    A paradigm shift occurred in musical culture in the early nineteenth century, whereby revered old works—newly called “classics”—began to rival contemporary ones as the guiding authority over taste. This article explores the less well-known composers found on programs in the period when classical repertories were becoming established. A kind of professional collegiality developed during this period on concert programs among pieces of diverse age and taste, reaching far beyond the iconic composers (now seen by most of us to have been (...)
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  11. Robert J. Weber, Joe Kelley & Susan Little (1972). Is Visual Image Sequencing Under Verbal Control? Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):354-362.score: 90.0
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  12. Marcel Weber (2008). Causes Without Mechanisms: Experimental Regularities, Physical Laws, and Neuroscientific Explanation. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):995-1007.score: 60.0
    This article examines the role of experimental generalizations and physical laws in neuroscientific explanations, using Hodgkin and Huxley’s electrophysiological model from 1952 as a test case. I show that the fact that the model was partly fitted to experimental data did not affect its explanatory status, nor did the false mechanistic assumptions made by Hodgkin and Huxley. The model satisfies two important criteria of explanatory status: it contains invariant generalizations and it is modular (both in James Woodward’s sense). Further, I (...)
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  13. E. Weber, T. A. C. Reydon, M. Boon, W. Houkes & P. E. Vermaas (2013). The ICE-Theory of Technical Functions. Metascience 22 (1):23-44.score: 60.0
    The ICE-theory of technical functions Content Type Journal Article Category Book Symposium Pages 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s11016-012-9642-9 Authors E. Weber, Centre for Logic and Philosophy of Science, Ghent University (UGent), Blandijnberg 2, 9000 Gent, Belgium T. A. C. Reydon, Institute of Philosophy, Leibniz University Hannover, Im Moore 21, 30167 Hannover, Germany M. Boon, Department of Philosophy, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands W. Houkes, Philosophy and Ethics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB (...)
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  14. Amara Hark Weber (2013). Crossroad. Continent 3 (2):43-59.score: 60.0
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
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  15. James Weber & Julie E. Seger (2002). Influences Upon Organizational Ethical Subclimates: A Replication Study of a Single Firm at Two Points in Time. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):69 - 84.score: 60.0
    This research replicates Weber's 1995 study of a large financial services firm that found that ethical subclimates exist within multi-departmental organizations, are influenced by the function of the department and the stakeholders served, and are relatively stable over time. Relying upon theoretical models developed by Thompson (1967) and Victor and Cullen (1998), hypotheses are developed that predict the ethical subclimate decision-making dimensions and type for diverse departments within a large steel manufacturing firm and that these ethical subclimate types will (...)
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  16. Samuel Weber (2005). Targets of Opportunity: On the Militarization of Thinking. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    The title of this book echoes a phrase used by the Washington Post to describethe American attempt to kill Saddam Hussein at the start of the war againstIraq. Its theme is the notion of targeting (skopos) as the name of an intentionalstructure in which the subject tries to confirm its invulnerability by aiming todestroy a target. At the center of the first chapter is Odysseus’s killing of the suitors;the second concerns Carl Schmitt’s Roman Catholicism and Political Form; thethird and fourth (...)
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  17. M. Weber (2005). In S. Kalberg. In Max Weber & Stephen Kalberg (eds.), Max Weber: Readings and Commentary on Modernity. Blackwell Pub..score: 60.0
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  18. Christian P. Weber (2012). Particular Universals—Universal Particulars: Biopolitical Metaphors and the Emergence of Nationalism in Europe (1650–1815). [REVIEW] History of European Ideas 39 (3):426-448.score: 60.0
    Summary Based on Max Weber's concept of Kulturnation and Hans Blumenberg's project of metaphorology, this essay argues that modern nations follow distinct cultural programmes that are inherent to their national ideas. Each national idea is propagated by a particular biopolitical metaphor, which performs a transfer from practical or scientific ideas about how nature structures and organises life to cultural ideas about how human lives should be socially and politically organised. The essay examines the emergence of the principal metaphors of (...)
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  19. Max Weber & On Freedom (1999). Felecia M. Briscoe. In Tm Powers & P. Kamolnick (ed.), From Kant to Weber: Freedom and Culture in Classical German Social Theory. 187.score: 60.0
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  20. Andreas Weber & Francisco J. Varela (2002). Life After Kant: Natural Purposes and the Autopoietic Foundations of Biological Individuality. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (2):97-125.score: 30.0
    This paper proposes a basic revision of the understanding of teleology in biological sciences. Since Kant, it has become customary to view purposiveness in organisms as a bias added by the observer; the recent notion of teleonomy expresses well this as-if character of natural purposes. In recent developments in science, however, notions such as self-organization (or complex systems) and the autopoiesis viewpoint, have displaced emergence and circular self-production as central features of life. Contrary to an often superficial reading, Kant gives (...)
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  21. Bruce H. Weber, David J. Depew, C. Dyke, Stanley N. Salthe, Eric D. Schneider, Robert E. Ulanowicz & Jeffrey S. Wicken (1989). Evolution in Thermodynamic Perspective: An Ecological Approach. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 4 (4):373-405.score: 30.0
    Recognition that biological systems are stabilized far from equilibrium by self-organizing, informed, autocatalytic cycles and structures that dissipate unusable energy and matter has led to recent attempts to reformulate evolutionary theory. We hold that such insights are consistent with the broad development of the Darwinian Tradition and with the concept of natural selection. Biological systems are selected that re not only more efficient than competitors but also enhance the integrity of the web of energetic relations in which they are embedded. (...)
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  22. Marcel Weber (2009). The Crux of Crucial Experiments: Duhem's Problems and Inference to the Best Explanation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (1):19-49.score: 30.0
    Going back at least to Duhem, there is a tradition of thinking that crucial experiments are impossible in science. I analyse Duhem's arguments and show that they are based on the excessively strong assumption that only deductive reasoning is permissible in experimental science. This opens the possibility that some principle of inductive inference could provide a sufficient reason for preferring one among a group of hypotheses on the basis of an appropriately controlled experiment. To be sure, there are analogues to (...)
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  23. Dawn R. Elm & James Weber (1994). Measuring Moral Judgment: The Moral Judgment Interview or the Defining Issues Test? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (5):341 - 355.score: 30.0
    This paper compares and contrasts two distinct techniques for measuring moral judgment: The Moral Judgment Interview and the Defining Issues Test. The theoretical foundations, accompanying advantages and limitations, as well as appropriate usage of these methodologies are discussed. Adaptation and use of the instruments for business ethics research is given special attention.
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  24. Tim De Mey & Erik Weber (2003). Explanation and Thought Experiments in History. History and Theory 42 (1):28–38.score: 30.0
  25. Max Weber & Colin Loader (1985). "Churches" and "Sects" in North America: An Ecclesiastical Socio-Political Sketch. Sociological Theory 3 (1):7-13.score: 30.0
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  26. Erik Weber, Jeroen Van Bouwel & Robrecht Vanderbeeken (2005). Forms of Causal Explanation. Foundations of Science 10 (4):437-454.score: 30.0
    In the literature on scientific explanation two types of pluralism are very common. The first concerns the distinction between explanations of singular facts and explanations of laws: there is a consensus that they have a different structure. The second concerns the distinction between causal explanations and uni.cation explanations: most people agree that both are useful and that their structure is different. In this article we argue for pluralism within the area of causal explanations: we claim that the structure of a (...)
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  27. Marcel Weber (2002). Incommensurability and Theory Comparison in Experimental Biology. Biology and Philosophy 17 (2):155-169.score: 30.0
    Incommensurability of scientific theories, as conceived by Thomas Kuhnand Paul Feyerabend, is thought to be a major or even insurmountable obstacletothe empirical comparison of these theories. I examine this problem in light ofaconcrete case from the history of experimental biology, namely the oxidativephosphorylation controversy in biochemistry (ca. 1961-1977). After a briefhistorical exposition, I show that the two main competing theories which werethe subject of the ox-phos controversy instantiate some of the characteristicfeatures of incommensurable theories, namely translation failure,non-corresponding predictions, and different (...)
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  28. Marcel Weber, Behavioral Traits, the Intentional Stance, and Biological Functions.score: 30.0
    It has been claimed that the intentional stance is necessary to individuate behavioral traits. This thesis, while clearly false, points to two interesting sets of problems concerning biological explanations of behavior: The first is a general in the philosophy of science: the theory-ladenness of observation. The second problem concerns the principles of trait individuation, which is a general problem in philosophy of biology. After discussing some alternatives, I show that one way of individuating the behavioral traits of an organism is (...)
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  29. Marcel Weber (2005). Indeterminism in Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):663-674.score: 30.0
    I examine different arguments that could be used to establish indeterminism of neurological processes. Even though scenarios where single events at the molecular level make the difference in the outcome of such processes are realistic, this falls short of establishing indeterminism, because it is not clear that these molecular events are subject to quantum mechanical uncertainty. Furthermore, attempts to argue for indeterminism autonomously (i.e., independently of quantum mechanics) fail, because both deterministic and indeterministic models can account for the empirically observed (...)
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  30. Michel Weber (2006). Whitehead's Onto-Epistemology of Perception and its Significance for Consciousness Studies. New Ideas in Psychology 24 (2):117-132.score: 30.0
  31. M. Weber (2005). Compassion and Pity: An Evaluation of Nussbaum's Analysis and Defense. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (5):487 - 511.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that Martha Nussbaums Aristotelian analysis of compassion and pity is faulty, largely because she fails to distinguish between (a) an emotions basic constitutive conditions and the associated constitutive or intrinsic norms, (b) extrinsic normative conditions, for instance, instrumental and moral considerations, and (c) the causal conditions under which emotion is most likely to be experienced. I also argue that her defense of compassion and pity as morally valuable emotions is inadequate because she treats a wide (...)
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  32. Marcel Weber (1996). Fitness Made Physical: The Supervenience of Biological Concepts Revisited. Philosophy of Science 63 (3):411-431.score: 30.0
    The supervenience and multiple realizability of biological properties have been invoked to support a disunified picture of the biological sciences. I argue that supervenience does not capture the relation between fitness and an organism's physical properties. The actual relation is one of causal dependence and is, therefore, amenable to causal explanation. A case from optimality theory is presented and interpreted as a microreductive explanation of fitness difference. Such microreductions can have considerable scope. Implications are discussed for reductive physicalism in evolutionary (...)
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  33. Erik Weber & Maarten Van Dyck (2002). Unification and Explanation. Synthese 131 (1):145 - 154.score: 30.0
    In this article we criticize two recent articles that examinethe relation between explanation and unification. Halonen and Hintikka (1999), on the one hand,claim that no unification is explanation. Schurz (1999), on the other hand, claims that all explanationis unification. We give counterexamples to both claims. We propose a pluralistic approach to the problem:explanation sometimes consists in unification, but in other cases different kinds of explanation(e.g., causal explanation) are required; and none of these kinds is more fundamental.
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  34. Marcel Weber (2008). Critical Notice: Darwinian Reductionism. Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):143-152.score: 30.0
  35. Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (1996). Natural Selection and Self-Organization. Biology and Philosophy 11 (1):33-65.score: 30.0
    The Darwinian concept of natural selection was conceived within a set of Newtonian background assumptions about systems dynamics. Mendelian genetics at first did not sit well with the gradualist assumptions of the Darwinian theory. Eventually, however, Mendelism and Darwinism were fused by reformulating natural selection in statistical terms. This reflected a shift to a more probabilistic set of background assumptions based upon Boltzmannian systems dynamics. Recent developments in molecular genetics and paleontology have put pressure on Darwinism once again. Current work (...)
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  36. Michael Weber (2007). Is Equality Essentially Comparative? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):209 - 226.score: 30.0
    Larry Temkin has shown that Derek Parfit’s well-known Mere Addition Paradox suggests a powerful argument for the intransitivity of the relation “better than.” The crux of the argument is the view that equality is essentially comparative, according to which the same inequality can be evaluated differently depending on what it is being compared to. The comparative view of equality should be rejected, I argue, and hence so too this argument for intransitivity.
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  37. Erik Weber (1999). Unification: What is It, How Do We Reach and Why Do We Want It? Synthese 118 (3):479-499.score: 30.0
    This article has three aims. The first is to give a partial explication of the concept of unification. My explication will be partial because I confine myself to unification of particular events, because I do not consider events of a quantitative nature, and discuss only deductive cases. The second aim is to analyze how unification can be reached. My third aim is to show that unification is an intellectual benefit. Instead of being an intellectual benefit unification could be an intellectual (...)
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  38. Erik Weber (1996). Explaining, Understanding and Scientific Theories. Erkenntnis 44 (1):1 - 23.score: 30.0
    One of the functions of scientific knowledge is to provide the theories and laws we need in order to understand the world. My article deals with the epistemic aspect of understanding, i.e., with understanding as unification. The aim is to explicate what we have to do in order to make our scientific knowledge contribute to an increase of the degree to which the particular events we have observed, fit into our world-picture. The analysis contains two parts. First I define the (...)
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  39. Michael Weber (2007). More on the Motive of Duty. Journal of Ethics 11 (1):65 - 86.score: 30.0
    A number of neo-Kantians have suggested that an act may be morally worthy even if sympathy and similar emotions are present, so long as they are not what in fact motivates right action–so long as duty, and duty alone, in fact motivates. Thus, the ideal Kantian moral agent need not be a cold and unfeeling person, as some critics have suggested. Two objections to this view need to be answered. First, some maintain that motives cannot be present without in fact (...)
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  40. Todd Bernard Weber (2000). Tragic Dilemmas and the Priority of the Moral. Journal of Ethics 4 (3):191-209.score: 30.0
    My purpose in this paper is to argue that we are not vulnerableto inescapable wrongdoing occasioned by tragic dilemmas. I directmy argument to those who are most inclined to accept tragicdilemmas: those of broadly Nietzschean inclination who reject``modern moral philosophy'''' in favor of the ethical ideas of theclassical Greeks. Two important features of their project are todeny the usefulness of the ``moral/nonmoral distinction,'''' and todeny that what are usually classified as moral reasons always oreven characteristically ``trump'''' nonmoral reasons in anadmirable (...)
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  41. James Weber & Sharon Green (1991). Principled Moral Reasoning: Is It a Viable Approach to Promote Ethical Integrity? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (5):325 - 333.score: 30.0
    In response to recent recommendations for the teaching of principled moral reasoning in business school curricula, this paper assesses the viability of such an approach. The results indicate that, while business students' level of moral reasoning in this sample are like most 18- to 21-year-olds, they may be incapable of grasping the concepts embodied in principled moral reasoning. Implications of these findings are discussed.
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  42. Bruce H. Weber (1999). Irreducible Complexity and the Problem of Biochemical Emergence. Biology and Philosophy 14 (4):593-605.score: 30.0
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  43. Jeroen van Bouwel & Erik Weber (2008). A Pragmatist Defense of Non-Relativistic Explanatory Pluralism in History and Social Science. History and Theory 47 (2):168–182.score: 30.0
    Explanatory pluralism has been defended by several philosophers of history and social science, recently, for example, by Tor Egil Førland in this journal. In this article, we provide a better argument for explanatory pluralism, based on the pragmatist idea of epistemic interests. Second, we show that there are three quite different senses in which one can be an explanatory pluralist: one can be a pluralist about questions, a pluralist about answers to questions, and a pluralist about both. We defend the (...)
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  44. Marianne Weber & Craig R. Bermingham (2003). Authority and Autonomy in Marriage. Sociological Theory 21 (2):85-102.score: 30.0
  45. Sharon Green & James Weber (1997). Influencing Ethical Development: Exposing Students to the AICPA Code of Conduct. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (8):777-790.score: 30.0
    Although the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct emphasizes the importance of education in ethics, very little is known about how and when the Code and the topic of ethics can be presented to enhance the effectiveness of ethics-oriented education. The purpose of this research was to provide preliminary evidence about the ethical development of students prior to, and immediately following, such courses. We found that: (1) accounting students, after taking an auditing course which emphasized the AICPA Code, reasoned at higher (...)
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  46. Marcel Weber (1999). The Aim and Structure of Ecological Theory. Philosophy of Science 66 (1):71-93.score: 30.0
    I present an attempt at an explication of the ecological theory of interspecific competition, including its explanatory role in community ecology and evolutionary biology. The account given is based on the idea that law-like statements play an important role in scientific theories of this kind. I suggest that the principle of competitive exclusion is such a law, and that it is evolutionarily invariant. The principle's empirical status is defended and implications for the ongoing debates on the existence of biological laws (...)
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  47. Marcel Weber, The Crux of Crucial Experiments: Confirmation in Molecular Biology.score: 30.0
    I defend the view that single experiments can provide a sufficient reason for preferring one among a group of hypotheses against the widely held belief that “crucial experiments” are impossible. My argument is based on the examination of a historical case from molecular biology, namely the Meselson-Stahl experiment. “The most beautiful experiment in biology”, as it is known, provided the first experimental evidence for the operation of a semi-conservative mechanism of DNA replication, as predicted by Watson and Crick in 1953. (...)
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  48. Michael Devaney & William Weber (2003). Abandoning the Public Good: How Universities Have Helped Privatize Higher Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):175-179.score: 30.0
    In this article we assert that much of the public good associated with teaching and research in higher education is gradually being displaced. This privatization of higher education is reflected in increased licensing of research and in the fragmentation of the traditional general education core. Taxpayer de-funding and institutional substitution are economic consequences of public good displacement.
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  49. Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (eds.) (2003). Evolution and Learning: The Baldwin Effect Reconsidered. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    The essays in this book discuss the originally proposed Baldwin effect, how it was modified over time, and its possible contribution to contemporary empirical...
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  50. Michael Weber (1998). The Resilience of the Allais Paradox. Ethics 109 (1):94-118.score: 30.0
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