Search results for 'Arnold Zellner' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Arnold Zellner, Hugo A. Keuzenkamp & Michael McAleer (eds.) (2001). Simplicity, Inference and Modeling: Keeping It Sophisticatedly Simple. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    The idea that simplicity matters in science is as old as science itself, with the much cited example of Ockham's Razor, 'entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem': entities are not to be multiplied beyond necessity. A problem with Ockham's razor is that nearly everybody seems to accept it, but few are able to define its exact meaning and to make it operational in a non-arbitrary way. Using a multidisciplinary perspective including philosophers, mathematicians, econometricians and economists, this monograph examines simplicity by (...)
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  2. Matthew Arnold (1969). Matthew Arnold and the Education of the New Order: A Selection of Arnold's Writings on Education. London, Cambridge U.P..score: 120.0
     
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  3. Matthew Arnold (1973). Matthew Arnold on Education. Harmondsworth,Penguin Education.score: 120.0
     
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  4. N. Scott Arnold (1983). Hume's Skepticism About Inductive Inference. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (1):31-56.score: 60.0
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Hume's Skepticism about Inductive Inference N. SCOTT ARNOLD IT HAS BEEN A COMMONPLACE among commentators on Hume's philosophy that he was a radical skeptic about inductive inference. In addition, he is alleged to have been the first philosopher to pose the so-called problem of induction. Until recently, however, Hume's argument in this connection has not been subject to very close scrutiny. As attention has become focused on (...)
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  5. Daniel Anderson Arnold (2012). Brains, Buddhas, and Believing: The Problem of Intentionality in Classical Buddhist and Cognitive-Scientific Philosophy of Mind. Columbia University Press.score: 60.0
    Aiming to complicate this story, Dan Arnold confronts a significant obstacle to popular attempts at harmonizing classical Buddhist and modern scientific thought: since most Indian Buddhists believe that the mental continuum is uninterrupted ...
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  6. N. Scott Arnold (2009). Imposing Values: Liberalism and Regulation. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    A major question for liberal politics and liberal political theory concerns the proper scope of government. Liberalism has always favored limited government, but there has been wide-ranging dispute among liberals about just how extensive the scope of government should be. Included in this dispute are questions about the extent of state ownership of the means of production, redistribution of wealth and income through the tax code and transfer programs, and the extent of government regulation. One of N. Scott Arnold's (...)
     
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  7. Denis G. Arnold & Norman E. Bowie (2003). Sweatshops and Respect for Persons. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):221-242.score: 30.0
    This article applies the Kantian doctrine of respect for persons to the problem of sweatshops. We argue that multinational enterprises are properly regarded as responsible for the practices of their subcontractors and suppliers. We then argue that multinational enterprises have the following duties in their offshore manufacturing facilities: to ensure that local labor laws are followed; to refrain from coercion; to meet minimum safety standards; and to provide a living wage for employees. Finally, we consider and reply to the objection (...)
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  8. Alexander Arnold (2013). Some Evidence is False. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (1):165 - 172.score: 30.0
    According to some philosophers who accept a propositional conception of evidence, someone's evidence includes a proposition only if it is true. I argue against this thesis by appealing to the possibility of knowledge from falsehood.
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  9. Jack Arnold & Stewart Shapiro (2007). Where in the (World Wide) Web of Belief is the Law of Non-Contradiction? Noûs 41 (2):276–297.score: 30.0
    It is sometimes said that there are two, competing versions of W. V. O. Quine’s unrelenting empiricism, perhaps divided according to temporal periods of his career. According to one, logic is exempt from, or lies outside the scope of, the attack on the analytic-synthetic distinction. This logic-friendly Quine holds that logical truths and, presumably, logical inferences are analytic in the traditional sense. Logical truths are knowable a priori, and, importantly, they are incorrigible, and so immune from revision. The other, radical (...)
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  10. Samuel Arnold (2011). The Difference Principle at Work. Journal of Political Philosophy 20 (1):94-118.score: 30.0
  11. N. Scott Arnold (1998). Affirmative Action and the Demands of Justice. Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (02):133-.score: 30.0
  12. Denis Arnold, Robert Audi & Matt Zwolinski (2010). Recent Work in Ethical Theory and its Implications for Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):559-581.score: 30.0
    We review recent developments in ethical pluralism, ethical particularism, Kantian intuitionism, rights theory, and climate change ethics, and show the relevance of these developments in ethical theory to contemporary business ethics. This paper explains why pluralists think that ethical decisions should be guided by multiple standards and why particularists emphasize the crucial role of context in determining sound moral judgments. We explain why Kantian intuitionism emphasizes the discerning power of intuitive reason and seek to integrate that with the comprehensiveness of (...)
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  13. Denis G. Arnold & Keith Bustos (2005). Business, Ethics, and Global Climate Change. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 24 (1/2):103-130.score: 30.0
    After providing a brief history of global climate change, we consider and reject the influential position that free markets and responsive democracies relieve corporations of obligations to protect the environment. Five main objections to the free market view are presented, focusing in particular on the roles of business organizations in the transportation and electricity generation sectors. Ethically grounded management and public policy recommendations are offered.
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  14. Peter J. Arnold (1992). Sport as a Valued Human Practice: A Basis for the Consideration of Some Moral Issues in Sport. Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (2):237–255.score: 30.0
  15. Denis G. Arnold (2003). Exploitation and the Sweatshop Quandary. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):243-256.score: 30.0
  16. Peter J. Arnold (1984). Sport, Moral Education and the Development of Character. Journal of Philosophy of Education 18 (2):275–281.score: 30.0
  17. Dan Arnold (2010). Self-Awareness ( Svasaṃvitti ) and Related Doctrines of Buddhists Following Dignāga: Philosophical Characterizations of Some of the Main Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (3):323-378.score: 30.0
    Framed as a consideration of the other contributions to the present volume of the Journal of Indian Philosophy , this essay attempts to scout and characterize several of the interrelated doctrines and issues that come into play in thinking philosophically about the doctrine of svasaṃvitti , particularly as that was elaborated by Dignāga and Dharmakīrti. Among the issues thus considered are the question of how mānasapratyakṣa (which is akin to manovijñāna ) might relate to svasaṃvitti ; how those related doctrines (...)
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  18. Dan Arnold (2008). Dharmakīrti's Dualism: Critical Reflections on a Buddhist Proof of Rebirth. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1079-1096.score: 30.0
    Dharmakīrti, elaborating one of the Buddhist tradition's most complete defenses of rebirth, advanced some of this tradition's most explicitly formulated arguments for mind-body dualism. At the same time, Dharmakīrti himself may turn out to be vulnerable to some of the same kinds of arguments pressed against physicalists. It is revealing, then, that in arguing against physicalism himself, Dharmakīrti does not have available to him what some would judge to be more promising arguments for dualism (arguments, in particular, following Kant's 2nd (...)
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  19. Denis G. Arnold (2003). Libertarian Theories of the Corporate and Global Capitalism. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (2):155-173.score: 30.0
    Libertarian theories of the normative core of the corporation hold in common the view that is the responsibility of publicity held corporations to return profits to shareholders within the bounds of certain moral side-constraints. Side-constraints may be either weak (grounded in the rules of the game) or strong (grounded in rights). This essay considers libertarian arguments regarding the normative core of the corporation in the context of global capitalism and in the light of actual corporate behavior. First, it is argued (...)
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  20. Keith Arnold (1989). Personal Identity: The Galton Details. Philosophia 19 (1):35-44.score: 30.0
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  21. Denis G. Arnold (2010). Transnational Corporations and the Duty to Respect Basic Human Rights. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):371-399.score: 30.0
    In a series of reports the United Nations Special Representative on the issue of Human Rights and Transnational Corporations has emphasized a tripartite framework regarding business and human rights that includes the state “duty to protect,” the TNC “responsibility to respect,” and “appropriate remedies” for human rights violations. This article examines the recent history of UN initiatives regarding business and human rights and places the tripartite framework in historical context. Three approaches to human rights are distinguished: moral, political, and legal. (...)
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  22. Megan Crowley-Matoka & Robert M. Arnold (2004). The Dead Donor Rule: How Much Does the Public Care ... And How Much Should. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):319-332.score: 30.0
    : In this brief commentary, we reflect on the recent study by Siminoff, Burant, and Youngner of public attitudes toward "brain death" and organ donation, focusing on the implications of their findings for the rules governing from whom organs can be obtained. Although the data suggest that many seem to view "brain death" as "as good as dead" rather than "dead" (calling the dead donor rule into question), we find that the study most clearly demonstrates that understanding an individual's definition (...)
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  23. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Hume's Skepticism in the Treatise of Human Nature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (3):450-452.score: 30.0
  24. Daniel Arnold (2001). Of Intrinsic Validity: A Study on the Relevance of Purva Mimamsa. Philosophy East and West 51 (1):26-53.score: 30.0
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  25. Eckhart Arnold, Tools of Toys? On Specific Challenges for Modeling and the Epistemology of Models and Computer Simulations in the Social Sciences.score: 30.0
    Mathematical models are a well established tool in most natural sciences. Although models have been neglected by the philosophy of science for a long time, their epistemological status as a link between theory and reality is now fairly well understood. However, regarding the epistemological status of mathematical models in the social sciences, there still exists a considerable unclarity. In my paper I argue that this results from specific challenges that mathematical models and especially computer simulations face in the social sciences. (...)
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  26. Denis G. Arnold (1997). Introspection and its Objects. Journal of Philosophical Research 22 (April):87-94.score: 30.0
    Traditionally conceived, introspection is a form of nonsensuous perception that allows the mind to scrutinize at least some of its own states while it is experiencing them. The traditional account of introspection has been in disrepute ever since Ryle argued that the very idea of introspection is a logical muddle. Recent critics such as William Lyons, John Searle, and Sydney Shoemaker argue that this disrepute is well-deserved. Three distinct objections to the traditional account of introspection are considered and rejected. It (...)
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  27. N. Scott Arnold (2009). The Endangered Species Act, Regulatory Takings, and Public Goods. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):353-377.score: 30.0
    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) can impose significant limitations on what landowners may do with their property, especially as it pertains to development. These restrictions imposed by the ESA are part of a larger controversy about the reach of the of the Fifth Amendment, which says that private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation. The question this paper addresses is whether these restrictions require compensation. The paper develops a position on the general question of compensation (...)
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  28. Denis G. Arnold (2006). Corporate Moral Agency. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):279–291.score: 30.0
    "The main conclusion of this essay is that it is plausible to conclude that corporations are capable of exhibiting intentionality, and as a result that they may be properly understood as moral agents" (p. 281).
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  29. Felix Arnold (1906). The So-Called Hedonist Paradox. International Journal of Ethics 16 (2):228-234.score: 30.0
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  30. Donald F. Arnold, Richard A. Bernardi, Presha E. Neidermeyer & Josef Schmee (2005). Personal Versus Professional Ethics in Confidentiality Decisions: An Exploratory Study in Western Europe. Business Ethics 14 (3):277-289.score: 30.0
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  31. Felix Arnold (1906). The Given Situation in Attention. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (21):567-573.score: 30.0
  32. Peter J. Arnold (1994). Sport and Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 23 (1):75-89.score: 30.0
    Abstract It is suggested that there are three broadly held views about sport in relation to the moral life??the positive view, the neutral view and the negative view. Following a brief examination of morality and moral education the first of these views is upheld by arguing that sport as fairness is inherently concerned with the moral. It is further argued that sport is a valued human practice concerned with the virtues and that as a part of the curriculum is an (...)
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  33. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Why Profits Are Deserved. Ethics 97 (2):387-402.score: 30.0
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  34. Dan Arnold (2008). Buddhist Idealism, Epistemic and Otherwise: Thoughts on the Alternating Perspectives of Dharmakīrti. Sophia 47 (1):3-28.score: 30.0
    Some influential interpreters of Dharmakīrti have suggested understanding his thought in terms of a ‘sliding scale of analysis.’ Here it is argued that this emphasis on Dharmakīrti's alternating philosophical perspectives, though helpful in important respects, obscures the close connection between the two views in play (identified by later commentators as ‘Sautrāntika’ and ‘Yogācāra’). Indeed, with respect to these perspectives as Dharmakīrti develops them, the epistemology is the same either way. Insofar as that is right, John Dunne's characterization of Dharmakīrti's Yogācāra (...)
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  35. Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman (2005). Beyond Sweatshops: Positive Deviancy and Global Labour Practices. Business Ethics 14 (3):206–222.score: 30.0
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  36. Felix Arnold (1905). The Unity of Mental Life. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (18):487-493.score: 30.0
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  37. Dan Arnold (2001). How to Do Things with Candrakirti: A Comparative Study in Anti-Skepticism. Philosophy East and West 51 (2):247-279.score: 30.0
    Two strikingly similar critiques of epistemological foundationalism are examined: J. L. Austin's critique of A. J. Ayer in the former's "Sense and Sensibilia," and part of Candrakīrti's critique of Dignāga in the first chapter of the "Prasannapadā." With respect to Austin, it is argued that his writings on epistemology in fact relate quite closely to his better-known philosophy of speech acts, and that the appeal to ordinary language is part of a transcendental argument against the possibility of radical skepticism. It (...)
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  38. Keith Arnold (2008). How to Think About Meaning - by Paul Saka. Philosophical Books 49 (4):386-388.score: 30.0
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  39. Dan Arnold (2006). On Semantics and Saṃketa: Thoughts on a Neglected Problem with Buddhist Apoha Doctrine. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (5):415-478.score: 30.0
    “...a theory of meaning for a particular language should be conceived by a philosopher as describing the practice of linguistic interchange by speakers of the language without taking it as already understood what it is to have a language at all: that is what, by imagining such a theory, we are trying to make explict." – Michael Dummer (2004: 31).
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  40. Harold Zellner (1995). “Is Relativism Self-Defeating?”. Journal of Philosophical Research 20:287-295.score: 30.0
    Plato seems to have claimed that epistemological relativism is self-defeating in two ways. As reformulated by Siegel: arguments for relativism must be advanced as either relativistically or non-relativistically sound. In either case they are dialectically ineffective for the relativist. Second, relativism is either relativistically or non-relativistically true. Either choice commits the relativist to major concessions to her opponent, or so the story goes. But the relativist can advance her arguments as non-relativistically sound, for the consumption of the non-relativist. Moreover, relativists (...)
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  41. Peter Arnold (1989). Competitive Sport, Winning and Education. Journal of Moral Education 18 (1):15-25.score: 30.0
  42. Peter J. Arnold (2005). Somaesthetics, Education, and the Art of Dance. Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (1):48-64.score: 30.0
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  43. Christopher Arnold (1980). Corrective Justice. Ethics 90 (2):180-190.score: 30.0
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  44. N. Scott Arnold (2000). Free Markets and Social Justice, Cass Sunstein. Oxford University Press, 1997, VI + 405 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):333-378.score: 30.0
  45. Patricia J. Arnold & Terrie C. Reeves (2006). International Trade and Health Policy: Implications of the GATS for US Healthcare Reform. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):313 - 332.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the implications of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), the World Trade Organization’s agreement governing trade in health-related services, for health policy and healthcare reform in the United States. The paper describes the nature and scope of US obligations under the GATS, the ways in which the trade agreement intersects with domestic health policy, and the institutional factors that mediate trade-offs between health and trade policy. The analysis suggests that the GATS provisions on market access, (...)
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  46. Dan Arnold (2005). Is Svasaṃvitti Transcendental? A Tentative Reconstruction Following Śāntarakṣita. Asian Philosophy 15 (1):77 – 111.score: 30.0
  47. Carroll C. Arnold (2007). Oral Rhetoric, Rhetoric, and Literature. Philosophy and Rhetoric 40 (1):170-187.score: 30.0
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  48. N. Scott Arnold, Theodore M. Benditt & George Graham (eds.) (1998). Philosophy Then and Now. Blackwell Publishers.score: 30.0
    This is followed by key selections from the essential writings of that philosopher, as well as influential selections from contemporary figures.
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  49. Denis G. Arnold (2005). Review of Dennis F. Thompson, Restoring Responsibility: Ethics in Government, Business, and Healthcare. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (7).score: 30.0
  50. Denis G. Arnold (2007). Review of Stuart P. Green, Lying, Cheating, and Stealing: A Moral Theory of White-Collar Crime. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (9).score: 30.0
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