Search results for 'Arnolds Kaufman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Arnold S. Kaufman (1967). Diesing and Piccone on Kaufman. Inquiry 10 (1-4):211-216.score: 300.0
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  2. Arnolds Kaufman (1971). Wants, Needs, and Liberalism. Inquiry 14 (1-4):191 – 206.score: 240.0
    The author's main practical aim is to defend liberal doctrines to which he is committed against certain fashionable criticisms. An elucidation of human needs is offered. The key claim is that human needs entail human rights. It is argued that the account proposed fits Marx's conception of human needs, and that, therefore, Marx was implicitly committed to a theory of human rights. It is then argued that John Stuart Mill was also, though implicitly, committed to a theory of human needs. (...)
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  3. James C. Kaufman (2005). Robert J. Sternberg Todd I. Lubart James C. Kaufman Jean E. Pretz. In K. Holyoak & B. Morrison (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning. Cambridge Univ Pr. 351.score: 180.0
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  4. Terry C. Muck, Rita M. Gross & Gordon Kaufman (forthcoming). Gordon Kaufman Interview. Buddhist-Christian Studies.score: 180.0
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  5. Arnold S. Kaufman (1965). On Alienation. Inquiry 8 (1-4):141 – 165.score: 100.0
    A definition of ?alienation? is proposed which is a rational reconstruction of the term as it is used in primarily moral contexts. Special attention is given to the Marxist tradition. It is argued that the earliest, moral form of Marx's economic determinism can be expressed in terms of the principle of the sufficiency of unalienated labor. In this connection four main kinds of alienation are distinguished. In the final section, it is argued that while ?alienation? has and should have an (...)
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  6. Arnold S. Kaufman (1953). The Analytic and the Synthetic: A Tenable "Dualism". Philosophical Review 62 (3):421-426.score: 100.0
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  7. Arnold S. Kaufman (1960). The Reform Theory of Punishment. Ethics 71 (1):49-53.score: 100.0
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  8. Arnold S. Kaufman (1963). Ability. Journal of Philosophy 60 (19):537-551.score: 100.0
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  9. Arnold S. Kaufman (1962). Moral Responsibility and the Use of `Could Have'. Philosophical Quarterly 12 (47):120-128.score: 100.0
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  10. Arnold S. Kaufman (1958). Book Review:The New Class. Milovan Djilas. [REVIEW] Ethics 68 (2):144-.score: 100.0
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  11. Arnold S. Kaufman (1959). Anthony Quinton on Punishment. Analysis 20 (1):10 - 13.score: 100.0
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  12. Arnold S. Kaufman (1966). Practical Decision. Mind 75 (297):25-44.score: 100.0
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  13. Arnold S. Kaufman (1954). The Nature and Function of Political Theory. Journal of Philosophy 51 (1):5-22.score: 100.0
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  14. Arnold S. Kaufman (1960). The Irresponsibility of American Social Scientists. Inquiry 3 (1-4):102 – 117.score: 100.0
    The arguments contained in books criticizing American social scientists by C. Wright Mills ( The Sociological Imagination) and Bernard Crick (The Science of American Politics) are discussed, compared and criticized. It is argued that Mills' criteria of evaluation and constructive alternatives to the tendencies he criticizes are immeasurably sounder than those found in Crick's book. An effort to supplement Mills' argument by providing a more explicit statement of its moral underpinnings is made. Finally, it is argued that though both critiques (...)
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  15. Arnold S. Kaufman (1968). A Sketch of a Liberal Theory of Fundamental Human Rights. The Monist 52 (4):595-615.score: 100.0
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  16. Arnold S. Kaufman (1968). The Aims of Scientific Activity. The Monist 52 (3):374-389.score: 100.0
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  17. Alexander Kaufman (1999). Welfare in the Kantian State. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    A traditional interpretation holds that Kant's political theory simply constitutes an account of the constraints which reason places on the state's authority to regulate external action. Alexander Kaufman argues that this traditional interpretation succeeds neither as a faithful reading of Kant's texts nor as a plausible, philosophically sound reconstruction of a `Kantian' political theory. Rather, he argues that Kant's political theory articulates a positive conception of the state's role.
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  18. Daniel A. Kaufman (2003). Critical Justification and Critical Laws. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):393-400.score: 60.0
    This essay counters the claim, made by Arnold Isenberg, Mary Mothersill, and others, that there can be no straightforward justification of critical evaluations of artworks, because there can be no critical laws. My argument is that if we adopt an Aristotelian view of the value of artworks, the problem of critical laws is reduced to a mere problem of scope and is easily solved. An Aristotelian system of kind classification, which groups artworks according to common formal and narrative purposes, provides (...)
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  19. Whitley R. P. Kaufman (2009). Justified Killing: The Paradox of Self-Defense. Lexington Books.score: 60.0
    In Justified Killing, Whitley R. P. Kaufman argues that none of the leading theories adequately explains why it is permissible even to kill an innocent attacker in self-defense, given the basic moral prohibition against killing the innocent ...
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  20. Richard Rodewald & Richard Wasserstrom (1972). The Political Philosophy of Arnold S. Kaufman. Social Theory and Practice 2 (1):5-31.score: 50.0
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  21. John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.) (2008). Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Do people have free will, or this universal belief an illusion? If free will is more than an illusion, what kind of free will do people have? How can free will influence behavior? Can free will be studied, verified, and understood scientifically? How and why might a sense of free will have evolved? These are a few of the questions this book attempts to answer. People generally act as though they believe in their own free will: they don't feel like (...)
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  22. Dan Kaufman (2008). Descartes on Composites, Incomplete Substances, and Kinds of Unity. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 90 (1):39-73.score: 30.0
    It is widely-accepted that Descartes is a substance dualist, i.e. that he holds that there are two and only two kinds of finite substance – mind and body. However, several scholars have argued that Descartes is a substance trialist, where the third kind of substance he admits is the substantial union of a mind and a body, the human being. In this paper, I argue against the trialist interpretation of Descartes. First, I show that the strongest evidence for trialism, based (...)
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  23. Whitley Kaufman (2012). Can Science Determine Moral Values? A Reply to Sam Harris. Neuroethics 5 (1):55-65.score: 30.0
    Sam Harris’ new book “The Moral Landscape” is the latest in a series of attempts to provide a new “science of morality.” This essay argues that such a project is unlikely to succeed, using Harris’ text as an example of the major philosophical problems that would be faced by any such theory. In particular, I argue that those trying to construct a scientific ethics need pay far more attention to the tradition of moral philosophy, rather than assuming the debate is (...)
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  24. Dan Kaufman (2007). Locke on Individuation and the Corpuscular Basis of Kinds. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):499-534.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I examine the crucial relationship between Locke’s theory of individuation and his theory of kinds. Locke holds that two material objects -- e.g., a mass of matter and an oak tree -- can be in the same place at the same time, provided that they are ‘of different kinds’. According to Locke, kinds are nominal essences, that is, general abstract ideas based on objective similarities between particularindividuals. I argue that Locke’s view on coinciding material objects is incompatible (...)
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  25. Frederik Kaufman (1996). Death and Deprivation; or, Why Lucretius' Symmetry Argument Fails. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (2):305 – 312.score: 30.0
  26. Whitley R. P. Kaufman (2005). Karma, Rebirth, and the Problem of Evil. Philosophy East and West 55 (1):15-32.score: 30.0
    : The doctrine of karma and rebirth is often praised for its ability to offer a successful solution to the Problem of Evil. This essay evaluates such a claim by considering whether the doctrine can function as a systematic theodicy, as an explanation of all human suffering in terms of wrongs done in either this or past lives. This purported answer to the Problem of Evil must face a series of objections, including the problem of anylackofmemoryofpastlives,the lack of proportionality between (...)
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  27. Dan Kaufman (2005). God's Immutability and the Necessity of Descartes's Eternal Truths. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):1-19.score: 30.0
  28. Frederik Kaufman (1995). An Answer to Lucretius' Symmetry Argument Against the Fear of Death. Journal of Value Inquiry 29 (1):57-64.score: 30.0
  29. Whitley Kaufman (2005). What's Wrong with Preventive War? The Moral and Legal Basis for the Preventive Use of Force. Ethics and International Affairs 19 (3):23–38.score: 30.0
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  30. Alexander Kaufman (2006). Rawls's Practical Conception of Justice: Opinion, Tradition and Objectivity in Political Liberalism. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (1):23-43.score: 30.0
    In Political Liberalism, Rawls emphasizes the practical character and aims of his conception of justice. Justice as fairness is to provide the basis of a reasoned, informed and willing political agreement by locating grounds for consensus in the fundamental ideas and values of the political culture. Critics urge, however, that such a politically liberal conception of justice will be designed merely to ensure the stability of political institutions by appealing to the currently-held opinions of actual citizens. In order to evaluate (...)
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  31. Whitley Kaufman (2008). Torture and the "Distributive Justice" Theory of Self-Defense: An Assessment. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (1):93–115.score: 30.0
  32. Dan Kaufman (2002). Descartes's Creation Doctrine and Modality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (1):24 – 41.score: 30.0
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  33. Dan Kaufman (2000). Descartes on the Objective Reality of Materially False Ideas. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):385–408.score: 30.0
    “The Standard Interpretation” of Descartes on material falsity states that Descartes believed that materially false ideas (MFIs) lack “objective reality” [realitas objectiva]. The argument for the Standard Interpretation depends on a statement from the “Third Meditation” that MFIs are caused by nothing. This statement, in conjunction with a causal principle introduced by Descartes, seems to entail that MFIs lack objective reality. However, the Standard Interpretation is incorrect. First, I argue that, despite initial appearances, the manner in which Descartes understands the (...)
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  34. Dan Kaufman (2003). Infimus Gradus Libertatis? Descartes on Indifference and Divine Freedom. Religious Studies 39 (4):391-406.score: 30.0
    Descartes held the doctrine that the eternal truths are freely created by God. He seems to have thought that a proper understanding of God's freedom entails such a doctrine concerning the eternal truths. In this paper, I examine Descartes' account of divine freedom. I argue that Descartes' statements about indifference, namely that indifference is the lowest grade of freedom and that indifference is the essence of God's freedom are not incompatible. I also show how Descartes arrived at his doctrine of (...)
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  35. Dan Kaufman (2003). Divine Simplicity and the Eternal Truths in Descartes. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):553 – 579.score: 30.0
  36. Cynthia Kaufman (2001). A User's Guide to White Privilege. Radical Philosophy Review 4 (1/2):30-38.score: 30.0
    Picking up where Peggy McKintosh’s “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack” left off, this essay looks further into the ways that racial privilege manifests itself in the lives of white Americans. It explores some of the reasons that white privilege is hard for whites to see and it explores the question of how white people can act responsibly given the unavoidable realities of racial privilege.
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  37. Frederik Kaufman (1992). Moral Realism and Moral Judgments. Erkenntnis 36 (1):103 - 112.score: 30.0
    For moral realists moral judgments will be a kind of factual judgment that involves the basically reliable apprehension of an objective moral reality. I argue that factual judgments display at least some degree of conceptual sensitivity to error, while moral judgments do not. Therefore moral judgments are not a kind of factual judgment.
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  38. Whitley R. P. Kaufman (2007). Karma, Rebirth, and the Problem of Evil: A Reply to Critics. Philosophy East and West 57 (4):556-560.score: 30.0
    The doctrine of karma and rebirth is often praised for its ability to offer a successful solution to the Problem of Evil. This essay evaluates such a claim by considering whether the doctrine can function as a systematic theodicy, as an explanation of all human suffering in terms of wrongs done in either this or past lives. This purported answer to the Problem of Evil must face a series of objections, including the problem of any lack of memory of past (...)
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  39. Whitley Kaufman (2010). Self-Defense, Innocent Aggressors, and the Duty of Martyrdom. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):78-96.score: 30.0
    On the traditional doctrine of self-defense, defensive force is permissible not only against Culpable Aggressors but against Innocent Aggressors as well (for example, psychotic aggressors). Some moral philosophers have recently challenged this view, arguing that one may not harm innocent attackers because morality requires culpability as an essential condition of being liable to defensive force. This essay examines and rejects this challenge as both a violation of common sense and as insufficiently grounded in convincing reasons from moral theory.
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  40. T. Forcht Dagi & Rebecca Kaufman (2001). Clarifying the Discussion on Brain Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (5):503 – 525.score: 30.0
    Definitions of death are based on subjective standards, priorities, and social conventions rather than on objective facts about the state of human physiology. It is the meaning assigned to the facts that determines whensomeone may be deemed to have died, not the facts themselves. Even though subjective standards for the diagnosis of death show remarkable consistency across communities, they are extrinsic. They are driven, implicitly or explicitly, by ideas about what benefits the community rather than what benefits the indidvidual. The (...)
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  41. Cynthia Kaufman (2002). Book Review: Susan Moller Okin. Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women? Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (4):228-232.score: 30.0
  42. Daniel A. Kaufman (2007). Family Resemblances, Relationalism, and the Meaning of 'Art'. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (3):280-297.score: 30.0
    Peter Kivy has maintained that the Wittgensteinian account of ‘art’ ‘is not a going concern’ and that ‘the traditional task of defining the work of art is back in fashion, with a vengeance’. This is true, in large part, because of the turn towards relational definitions of ‘art’ taken by philosophers in the 1960s; a move that is widely believed to have countered the Wittgensteinian charge that ‘art’ is an open concept and which gave rise to a ‘New Wave’ in (...)
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  43. Daniel A. Kaufman (2006). Knowledge, Wisdom, and the Philosopher. Philosophy 81 (1):129-151.score: 30.0
    The overarching thesis of this essay is that despite the etymological relationship between the word ‘philosophy’ and wisdom—the word ‘philosophos’, in Greek, means ‘lover of wisdom’—and irrespective of the longstanding tradition of identifying philosophers with ‘wise men’—mainline philosophy, historically, has had little interest in wisdom and has been preoccupied primarily with knowledge. Philosophy, if we are speaking of the mainline tradition, has had and continues to have more in common with the natural and social sciences than it does with the (...)
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  44. David Kaufman (2000). Correlations, Constellations and the Truth: Adorno's Ontology of Redemption. Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (5):62-80.score: 30.0
    The Anglo-American reception of Adorno has secularized his thought and thus missed its normative basis. In this article, the 'constella-tion', a central feature of Adorno's philosophy, is traced to Hermann Cohen's anti-immanentist notion of 'Korrelation' and to Benjamin's attempt to discover a radically Kantian and adamantly Jewish ontology and concept of the truth. Adorno's works are shown to limn a critical measure for being and for reason, based on a very un-Hegelian refusal of immanence and on a commitment to a (...)
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  45. Frederik Kaufman (1998). Speciesism and the Argument From Misfortune. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):155–163.score: 30.0
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  46. Whitley R. P. Kaufman (2000). On a Purported Error About the Doctrine of Double Effect: A Reply to Sophie Botros. Philosophy 75 (2):283-295.score: 30.0
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  47. Whitley Kaufman (2004). Is There a “Right” to Self‐Defense? Criminal Justice Ethics 23 (1):20-32.score: 30.0
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  48. Daniel A. Kaufman (2002). Normative Criticism and the Objective Value of Artworks. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (2):151–166.score: 30.0
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  49. Daniel A. Kaufman (2005). Between Reason and Common Sense. On the Very Idea of Necessary (Though Unwarranted) Belief. Philosophical Investigations 28 (2):134–158.score: 30.0
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