Search results for 'Art' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nicholas Alden Riggle (2010). Street Art: The Transfiguration of the Commonplaces. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):243-257.score: 27.0
    According to Arthur Danto, post-modern or post-historical art began when artists like Andy Warhol collapsed the Modern distinction between art and everyday life by bringingthe (...) everydayinto the artworld. I begin by pointing out that there is another way to collapse this distinction: bring art out of the artworld and into everyday life. An especially effective way of doing this to make street art, which, I argue, is art whose meaning depends on its use of the street. I defend this definition and show how it handles graffiti and public art. (shrink)
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  2. Noël Carroll (2002). The Wheel of Virtue: Art, Literature, and Moral Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):3–26.score: 27.0
    In this essay, then, I would like to address what I believe are the most compelling epistemic arguments against the notion that literature (and art more broadly) (...)
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  3. Johan de Smedt & Helen de Cruz (2011). A Cognitive Approach to the Earliest Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):379-389.score: 27.0
    This paper takes a cognitive perspective to assess the significance of some Late Palaeolithic artefacts (sculptures and engraved objects) for philosophicalconcepts of art. We examine cognitive capacities (...)
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  4. Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). Art, Metaphysics, & the Paradox of Standards. In , Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    I consider the field of aesthetics to be at its most productive and engaging when adopting a broadly philosophically informative approach to its core issues (e.g., (...)shaping and testing putative art theoretic commitments against the relevant standard models employed in philosophy of language, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind) and to be at its most impotent and bewildering when cultivating a philosophically insular character (e.g., selecting interpretative, ontological, or conceptual models solely for fit with pre-fixed art theoretic commitments). For example, when philosophical aesthetics tends toward insularity, we shouldnt be surprised to find standard art-ontological categories incongruous with those standardly employed in contemporary metaphysics. Of course, when contemporary metaphysics tends to ignore aesthetic and art theoretic concerns, perhaps we likewise shouldnt be surprised to find the climate of contemporary metaphysics inhospitable for a theory of art. While this may seem to suggest at least a prima facie tension between our basic art theoretic commitments considered from within philosophical aesthetics and our standard ontological commitments considered from without, I think any perceived tension or antagonism largely due to metaphysicians and aestheticians (at least implicitly) assuming there to be but two available methodological positions with respect to the relationship between contemporary metaphysics and philosophical aesthetics (in the relevant overlap areas). I call these two opposing views the Deference View and the Independence View. I argue that either view looks to lead to what I call the Paradox of Standards. (shrink)
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  5. Christy Mag Uidhir (2012). Photographic Art: An Ontology Fit to Print. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (1):31-42.score: 27.0
    A standard art-ontological position is to construe repeatable artworks as abstract objects that admit multiple concrete instances. Since photographic artworks are putatively repeatable, the ontology of (...)photographic art is by default modelled after standard repeatable-work ontology. I argue, however, that the construal of photographic artworks as abstracta mistakenly ignores photographys printmaking genealogy, specifically its ontological inheritance. More precisely, I claim that the products of printmaking media (prints) minimally must be construed in a manner consistent with basic print ontology, the most plausible model of which looks decidedly nominalist (what I call the relevant similarity model) and that as such, photographic artworks must be likewise construed, not as abstracta but as individual and distinct concreta. That is, the correct ontological account of photographic art must be one according to which photographic artworks are individual and distinct concrete artworks. In the end, I show that the ontology of photographic art resists the standard repeatable-work model because the putative repeatability of photographic artworks is upon closer inspection nothing more than the relevant similarity relation between individual and distinct photographic prints. (shrink)
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  6. Aaron Smuts (2013). Painful Art and the Limits of Well-Being. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly. Palgrave/ Macmillan.score: 27.0
    In this chapter I explore what painful art can tell us about the nature and importance of human welfare. My goal is not so much to defend (...)
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  7. Jochen Briesen (2014). Pictorial Art and Epistemic Aims. In Harald Klinke (ed.), Art Theory as Visual Epistemology. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 11-28.score: 27.0
    The question whether art is of any epistemic value is an old question in the philosophy of art. Whereas many contemporary artists, art-critics, and art-historians answer (...) this question affirmatively, many contemporary philosophers remain skeptical. If art is of epistemic significance, they maintain, then it has to contribute to our quest of achieving our most basic epistemic aim, namely knowledge.Unfortunately, recent and widely accepted analyses of knowledge make it very hard to see how art might significantly contribute to the quest of achieving this aim. Hence, by the lights of recent epistemology, it is questionable whether art is of any epistemic value. In order to hold on to the epistemic value of art, one has three options: (a) reject the recent analyses of knowledge that make the epistemic value of art questionable, (b) accept the recent analyses of knowledge but argue that they are compatible with the epistemic value of art, or (c) find another epistemic aim (besides knowledge) and show that art is of significant help in achieving this aim. In this paper I will argue that, at least with respect to pictorial art, option (c) seems promising. By reconsidering some basic insights and ideas from Nelson Goodman we can identify (objective) understanding as an epistemic aim to which pictorial art makes a significant contribution. (shrink)
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  8. Iskra Fileva (2013). Playing with Fire: Art and the Seductive Power of Pain. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 27.0
    I discuss the aesthetic power of painful art. I focus on artworks that occasion pain byhitting too close to home,” i.e., by presenting narratives meant (...)to beabout us.” I consider various reasons why such works may have aesthetic value for us, but I argue that the main reason has to do with the power of such works to transgress conversational boundaries. The discussion is meant as a contribution to the debate on the paradox of tragedy. (shrink)
     
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  9. Markus Schrenk (forthcoming). IS PROPRIOCEPTIVE ART POSSIBLE? In Graham George Priest & Damon Young (eds.), Philosophy and the Martial Arts.score: 25.0
    I argue for the possibility of a proprioceptive art in addition to, for example, visual or auditory arts, where aspects of some martial arts will serve as (...)
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  10. Aaron Smuts (2005). Are Video Games Art? Contemporary Aesthetics 2.score: 24.0
    I argue that by any major definition of art many modern video games should be considered art. Rather than defining art and defending video games based on (...)
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  11. Dustin Stokes (2014). Cognitive Penetration and the Perception of Art (Winner of 2012 Dialectica Essay Prize). Dialectica 68 (1):1-34.score: 24.0
    There are good, even if inconclusive, reasons to think that cognitive penetration of perception occurs: that cognitive states like belief causally affect, in a relatively direct way, (...)
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  12. Nicholas Maxwell (2003). Art as Its Own Interpretation. In Andreea Ruvoi (ed.), Interpretation and Its Objects: Studies in the Philosophy of Michael Krausz. Rodopi.score: 24.0
    In this article I argue that a work of art provides the best interpretation of itself - more faithful than any other scholarly interpretative work.
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  13. Christy Mag Uidhir (2009). Why Pornography Can'T Be Art. Philosophy and Literature 33 (1):pp. 193-203.score: 24.0
    Claims that pornography cannot be art typically depend on controversial claims about essential value differences (moral, aesthetic) between pornography and art. In this paper, I offer a (...)
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  14. Paul Crowther (2007). Defining Art, Creating the Canon: Artistic Value in an Era of Doubt. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Introduction : normative aesthetics and artistic value -- Culture and artistic value -- Cultural exclusion and the definition of art -- Defining art, defending the canon, contesting culture -- The (...)aesthetic and the artistic -- From beauty to art : developing Kant's aesthetics -- The scope and value of the artistic image -- Distinctive modes of imaging -- Twofoldness : pictorial art and the imagination -- Between language and perception : literary metaphor -- Musical meaning and value -- Eternalizing the moment : artistic projections of time -- Conclusion : the status and future of art. (shrink)
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  15. Mohan Matthen (2011). Art, Sexual Selection, Group Selection (Critical Notice of Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct). Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):337-356.score: 24.0
    The capacity to engage with art is a human universal present in all cultures and just about every individual human. This indicates that this capacity is evolved. (...)
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  16. Aaron Smuts (2007). The Paradox of Painful Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 41 (3):59-77.score: 24.0
    Many of the most popular genres of narrative art are designed to elicit negative emotions: emotions that are experienced as painful or involving some degree of pain, (...)
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  17. Aaron Smuts (2005). Video Games and the Philosophy of Art. American Society for Aesthetics Newsletter.score: 24.0
    The most cursory look at video games raises several interesting issues that have yet to receive any consideration in the philosophy of art, such as: Are videogames (...)
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  18. Noël Carroll (1999). Philosophy of Art: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Philosophy of Art is a textbook for undergraduate students interested in the topic of philosophical aesthetics. It aims to introduce the techniques of analytic philosophy in addition (...)
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  19. Matthew Kieran (ed.) (2006). Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Blackwell Pub..score: 24.0
    Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art features pairs of newly commissioned essays by some of the leading theorists working in the field today. Brings (...)
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  20. Paisley Livingston (2005). Art and Intention: A Philosophical Study. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    In Art and intention Paisley Livingston develops a broad and balanced perspective on perennial disputes between intentionalists and anti-intentionalists in philosophical aesthetics and critical theory. He (...)surveys and assesses a wide range of rival assumptions about the nature of intentions and the status of intentionalist psychology. With detailed reference to examples from diverse media, art forms, and traditions, he demonstrates that insights into the multiple functions of intentions have important implications for our understanding of artistic creation and authorship, the ontology of art, conceptions of texts, works, and versions, basic issues pertaining to the nature of fiction and fictional truth, and the theory of art interpretation and appreciation. Livingston argues that neither the inspirationist nor rationalistic conceptions can capture the blending of deliberate and intentional, spontaneous and unintentional processes in the creation of art. Texts, works, and artistic structures and performances cannot be adequately individuated in the absence of a recognition of the relevant makers4intentions. The distinction between complete and incomplete works receives an action-theoretic analysis that makes possible an elucidation of several different senses of "fragment" in critical discourse. Livingston develops an account of authorship, contending that the recognition of intentions is in fact crucial to our understanding of diverse forms of collective art-making. An artist's short-term intentions and long-term plans and policies interact in complex ways in the emergence of an artistic oeuvre, and our uptake of such attitudes makes an important difference to our appreciation of the relations between items belonging to a single life-work. The intentionalism Livingston advocates is, however, a partial one, and accommodates a number of important anti-intentionalist contentions. Intentions are fallible, and works of art, like other artefacts, can be put to a bewildering diversity of uses. Yet some important aspects of art's meaning and value are linked to the artist's aims and activities. (shrink)
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  21. Noël Carroll (2010). Art in Three Dimensions. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Art in Three Dimensions is a collection of essays by one of the most eminent figures in philosophy of art.
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  22. R. G. Collingwood (1958). The Principles of Art. New York, Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This treatise on aesthetics criticizes various psychological theories of art, offers new theories and interpretations, and draws important inferences concerning ...
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  23. Jerrold Levinson (2006). Contemplating Art: Essays in Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Contemplating Art is a compendium of writings from the last ten years by one of the leading figures in aesthetics, Jerrold Levinson. The twenty-four essays range (...)over issues in general aesthetics and those relating to specific arts--in particular music, film, and literature. It will appeal not only to philosophers but also to musicologists, literary theorists, art critics, and reflective lovers of the arts. (shrink)
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  24. Mohan Matthen (forthcoming). Play, Skill, and the Origins of Perceptual Art. British Journal of Aesthetics.score: 24.0
    Art is universal across cultures. Yet, it is biologically expensive because of the energy expended and reduced vigilance. Why do humans make and contemplate it? This paper (...)
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  25. José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.) (2003). Art and Morality. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Art and Morality is a collection of groundbreaking new papers on the theme of aesthetics and ethics, and the link between the two subjects. A group of (...)
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  26. Simon Fokt (2012). Pornographic Art - A Case From Definitions. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (3):287-300.score: 24.0
    On the whole, neither those who hold that pornography can never be art nor their opponents specify what they actually mean byart’, even though it seems (...)
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  27. Christy Mag Uidhir (2010). Failed-Art and Failed Art-Theory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (3):381-400.score: 24.0
    An object being non-art appears only trivially informative. Some non-art objects, however, could be saliently 'almost' art, and therefore objects for which being non-art is (...)
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  28. Dustin Stokes (2006). Art and Modal Knowledge. In Dominic Lopes & Matthew Kieran (eds.), Knowing Art: Essays in Epistemology and Aesthetics. Springer.score: 24.0
  29. Lars Aagaard-Mogensen (ed.) (1976). Culture and Art: An Anthology. Humanities Press.score: 24.0
    Danto, A. The artworld.--Dickie, G. What is art?--Margolis, J. Works of art are physically embodied and culturally emergent entities.--Kjørup, S. Art broadly and wholly conceived.-- (...)Meyer, L. B. Forgery and the anthropology of art.--Brunius, T. Theory and ideologies in aesthetics.--Tilghman, B. R. Artistic puzzlement.--Binkley, T. Deciding about art.--Alexander, H. G. On defining in aesthetics.--Iseminger, G. Appreciation, the artworld, and the aesthetic.--Glickman, J. Creativity in the arts.--Sclafani, R. The theory of art.--Lyas, C. Danto and Dickie on art.--Beardsley, M. C. Is art essentially institutional? (shrink)
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  30. Gavin Keeney (2011). "Else-Where": Essays in Art, Architecture, and Cultural Production 2002-2011. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.score: 24.0
    Else-whereis a synoptic survey of the representational values given to art, architecture, and cultural production from 2002 through 2011. Written primarily as a critique of (...)what is suppressed in architecture and what is disclosed in art, the essays are informed by the passage out of post-structuralism and its disciplinary analogues toward the real Real (denoted over the course of the studies as theReal-IrrealorElse-where”). While architecture nominally addresses an environmental ethos, it also famously negotiates its own representational values by way of its putative autonomy (autonomy as self-interest, versus selflessness); its main repression in this regard islandscape,” figure of the Other and figure of the Real. Engaging forms of spectrality, and not necessarily speculative intelligence per se, architecture is alsoconsciousof its own complicity in capitalist orders, a complicity that in part underwrites its avant-garde forms of agitation since the onset of modern architecture. As a result, and over the course of the twentieth century, architectural vanguards have successively been depleted such that they return only as reified half-measures in the late-modern production of difference. As such, the essayActually Existing Ground” (2008) examines the failed promise of Landscape Urbanism. Since the 1960s, as with the allied arts, architecture has evacuated many of the utopian gestures given to modernism and embraced a form of ultra-contingency in a direct alliance with the post-modern and post-Marxist concession to markets and to cultural production as principal means of establishing formal hegemony. This recourse or surrender to the economic-determinist ethos of post-modernity, regardless of attempts to problematize it and/or critique it through types of what Manfredo Tafuri has calledoperative criticism” (works of architecture as criticism), has, arguably, all but failed, and with the suggestive return circa 2011 of new forms of resistance an exit from the accommodating spirit of the times is indicative of the expectation of strenuous, yet highly formal and non-discursive operations within artistic and architectural production. The essays collected inElse-wherecross various disciplines, inclusive of landscape architecture, architecture, and visual art, to develop a nuanced critique of an emergent formal regard in the arts that is also an invocation of the highest coordinates given to the artsformal ontology as speculative intelligence itselfor the return of the universal as utopian thoughthere-and-now.”. (shrink)
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  31. Christy Mag Uidhir & P. D. Magnus (2011). Art Concept Pluralism. Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):83-97.score: 24.0
    Abstract: There is a long tradition of trying to analyze art either by providing a definition (essentialism) or by tracing its contours as an indefinable, open concept (...)
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  32. Moshe Barasch (1985/2000). Theories of Art. Routledge.score: 24.0
    In this volume, the third in his classic series on art theory, Moshe Barasch traces the hidden patterns and interlocking themes in the study of art, from (...)
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  33. Cynthia Freeland (2001). But is It Art?: An Introduction to Art Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    From Andy Warhol's Brillo boxes to provocative dung-splattered madonnas, in today's art world many strange, even shocking, things are put on display. This often leads (...)
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  34. Stephen Davies (1991). Definitions of Art. Cornell University Press.score: 24.0
    Stephen Davies describes and analyzes the definition of art as it has been discussed in Anglo-American philosophy during this period and, in the process, ...
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  35. Derek Matravers (1998). Art and Emotion. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Matravers examines how emotions form the bridge between our experience of art and of life. We often find that a particular poem, painting, or piece of music (...)
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  36. Paul Crowther (1993). Art and Embodiment: From Aesthetics to Self-Consciousness. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    In his Critical Aesthetics and Postmodernism, Paul Crowther argued that art and aesthetic experiences have the capacity to humanize. In Art and Embodiment he develops this theme (...)
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  37. Barry Allen (2008). Artifice and Design: Art and Technology in Human Experience. Cornell University Press.score: 24.0
    The book concludes that it is a mistake to think of Art as something subjective, or as an arbitrary social representation, and of Technology as an instrumental (...)
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  38. Derek Allan (2009). An Intellectual Revolution: André Malraux and the Temporal Nature of Art. Journal of European Studies 39 (2):198-224.score: 24.0
    Very little has been written in recent decades about the temporal nature of art. The two principal explanations provided by our Western cultural tradition are that art (...)
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  39. Noel Carroll (2012). History and the Philosophy of Art. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):370-382.score: 24.0
    Abstract In this essay I trace the role of history in the philosophy of art from the early twentieth century to the present, beginning with the rejection (...)
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  40. Matthew Kieran (2005). Revealing Art. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Why does art matter to us, and what makes good art? Why is the role of imagination so important in art? Illustrated with carefully chosen color and (...)
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  41. Nöel Carroll (2012). Art in an Expanded Field: Wittgenstein and Aesthetics. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 42 (42):14-31.score: 24.0
    This article reviews the various ways in which the later writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein have been employed to address the questionWhat is Art?”. These include the (...)
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  42. Berys Nigel Gaut & Paisley Livingston (eds.) (2003). The Creation of Art: New Essays in Philosophical Aesthetics. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Although creativity, from Plato onwards, has been recognized as a topic in philosophy, it has been overshadowed by investigations of the meanings and values of works of (...)
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  43. Nicholas Wolterstorff (1980). Works and Worlds of Art. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    In this book the author treats art as an action performed by the artist as agent, rather than examining it from the point of view of its (...)
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  44. Andrea Lavazza (2009). Art as a Metaphor of the Mind. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):159-182.score: 24.0
    This paper focuses on the emergent neo-Jamesian perspective concerning the phenomenology of art and aesthetic experience. Starting from the distinction between nucleus and fringe in the (...)stream of thought described by William James, it can be argued that our appreciation of a work of art is guided by a vague and blurred perception of a much more powerful content, of which we are not fully aware. Accordingly, a work of art is seen as a kind of metaphor of our mental life, objectified to be able to reach out to a much larger audience. However, it is arealistictheory rooted in evolutionary psychology, which claims that our mind developed within a framework shaped by environmental pressures. The aesthetics illustrated by several novelists develops a paradigm for this theory. The search for the neuronal correlates of stream of consciousness allows to make a comparison with the recent findings of neuroaesthetics and to reject its claim that it is unnecessary to take phenomenology and psychology into account. (shrink)
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  45. Noël Carroll (2009). Les Culs-de-Sac of Enlightenment Aesthetics: A Metaphilosophy of Art. Metaphilosophy 40 (2):157-178.score: 24.0
    Abstract: This article charts the rise and fall of the Modern System of the Arts and the failure of the aesthetic theory of art to define membership (...)
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  46. Simon Fokt (2013). Solving Wollheim's Dilemma: A Fix for the Institutional Definition of Art. Metaphilosophy 44 (5):640-654.score: 24.0
    Richard Wollheim threatened George Dickie's institutional definition of art with a dilemma which entailed that the theory is either redundant or incomprehensible and useless. This article (...)modifies the definition to avoid such criticism. First, it shows that the definition's concept of the artworld is not vague when understood as a conventional system of beliefs and practices. Then, based on Gaut's cluster theory, it provides an account of reasons artworld members have to confer the status of a candidate for appreciation. An authorised member of an artworld has a good reason to confer the status on an object if it satisfies a subset of criteria respected as sufficient within this artworld. The first horn of the dilemma is averted because explaining the reasons behind conferral cannot eliminate references to the institution, and the second loses its sharpness, as accepting partial arbitrariness of the conferral does not deprive the theory of its explanatory power. (shrink)
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  47. Andrew E. Benjamin (1991). Art, Mimesis, and the Avant-Garde: Aspects of a Philosophy of Difference. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Art, Mimesis and the Avant-Garde explores the relationship between art and philosophy. Andrew Benjamin argues for a reworking of the task of philosophy in terms of (...)the centrality of ontology. It is in relation to this centrality, understood through the differences between modes of being, that art, mimesis, and the avant-garde come to be presented. A fundamental part of this book is the original interpretations of important contemporary painters and their themes: Lucian Freud's self-portraits, Francis <span class='Hi'>Baconspan>'s use of mirrors, R. B. Kitaj and Jewish identity, Anselm Kiefer and iconoclasm. Apart from painting, Benjamin considers architecture, literature, and the philosophical writings of Walter Benjamin and Descartes in elaborating the various aspects of ontological difference. Benjamin develops the theory of the avant-garde as a philosophical category rather than a historical marker, thus bringing the worlds of contemporary art criticism and contemporary philosophy closer together. (shrink)
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  48. Garry Hagberg (ed.) (2008). Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell.score: 24.0
    A timely and philosophically significant contribution to modern aesthetics featuring some of the best contemporary work in philosophical studies of literature, moral beliefs, and thinking in art (...)
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  49. Justine Kingsbury (2011). (R)Evolutionary Aesthetics: Denis Dutton's The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure and Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 26 (1):141-150.score: 24.0
    Denis Duttons The Art Instinct succeeds admirably in showing that it is possible to think about art from a biological point of view, and this is (...)a significant achievement, given that resistance to the idea that cultural phenomena have biological underpinnings remains widespread in many academic disciplines. However, his account of the origins of our artistic impulses and the far-reaching conclusions he draws from that account are not persuasive. This article points out a number of problems: in particular, problems with Duttons appeal to sexual selection, with his discussion of the adaptation/by-product distinction and its significance, and with drawing normative conclusions from evolutionary hypotheses. (shrink)
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  50. Peter Lamarque & Stein Haugom Olsen (eds.) (2004). Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art: The Analytic Tradition: An Anthology. Blackwell Pub..score: 24.0
    &quot;Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art&quot; also features a selection of key papers from subsequent contributors that illustrate how the debates developed and how ...
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