Search results for 'Art and morality' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard Francis, Homi K. Bhabha, Yve Alain Bois & Museum of Contemporary Art (1996). Negotiating Rapture the Power of Art to Transform Lives.
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  2.  1
    Joseph H. Kupfer (2013). Extreme Makeover: Art and Morality in The Shape of Things. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):296-314.
    Many of us might welcome a makeover in our appearance, but how would we feel if it involved being emotionally manipulated in the name of art? The story of a young woman’s reshaping of her boyfriend encourages us to consider whether the creation of art could justify what would otherwise be immoral behavior. For example, do moral considerations always take precedence over other values, such as the aesthetic? The subordinate themes of gender and narrative inform Neil LaBute’s cinematic portrayal of (...)
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  3.  18
    Andrea Sauchelli, Art and Morality. Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    A great number of works of art, it is commonly claimed, are aesthetically valuable. Some philosophers have even argued that providing an aesthetically pleasing experience is their only proper function. However, some of these artworks display or invite us to adopt an immoral point of view. Even worse, they even seem to make immoral situations delightful and appealing. The following questions thus arise: Does the alleged immorality of these works count as an aesthetic or artistic defect? Can an immoral movie (...)
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  4.  4
    Matthew Kieran (2003). Art and Morality. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford 451--470.
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  5. José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.) (2003). Art and Morality. Routledge.
    Art and Morality is a collection of groundbreaking new papers on the theme of aesthetics and ethics, and the link between the two subjects. A group of world-class contributors tackle the important question that arise when one thinks about the moral dimensions of art and the aesthetic dimension of moral life. The volume is a significant contribution to the philosophical literature, opening up unexplored questions and shedding new light on more traditional debates in aesthetics. The topics explored include the (...)
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  6.  45
    Paul Russell (2008). Free Will, Art and Morality. Journal of Ethics 12 (3/4):307 - 325.
    The discussion in this paper begins with some observations regarding a number of structural similarities between art and morality as it involves human agency. On the basis of these observations we may ask whether or not incompatibilist worries about free will are relevant to both art and morality. One approach is to claim that libertarian free will is essential to our evaluations of merit and desert in both spheres. An alternative approach, is to claim that free will is (...)
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  7.  99
    Reed Winegar (2011). Good Sense, Art, and Morality in Hume's ''Of the Standard of Taste''. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):17-35.
    In his essay ‘‘Of the Standard of Taste,’’ Hume argues that artworks with morally flawed outlooks are, to some extent, aesthetically flawed. While Hume's remarks regarding the relationship between art and morality have influenced contemporary aestheticians, Hume's own position has struck many people as incoherent. For Hume appears to entangle himself in two separate contradictions. First, Hume seems to claim both that true judges should not enter into vicious sentiments and that true judges should adopt the standpoint of an (...)
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  8. Casey Haskins (2001). Art, Morality, and the Holocaust: The Aesthetic Riddle of Benigni's Life is Beautiful. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (4):373–384.
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  9. Matthew Kieran (2006). Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value. Philosophy Compass 1 (2):129–143.
  10. Matthew Kieran (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Art, Morality and Ethics: On the Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value. Philosophy Compass 5 (5):426-431.
  11.  33
    Kenneth L. Buckman (1997). Gadamer on Art, Morality, and Authority. Philosophy and Literature 21 (1):144-150.
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  12.  55
    Katrin Froese (2008). The Art of Becoming Human: Morality in Kant and Confucius. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (3):257-268.
    Kant and Confucius maintain that the art of becoming human is synonymous with the unending process of becoming moral. According to Kant, I must imagine a world in which the universality of my maxims were possible, while realizing that if such a world existed, then morality would disappear. Morality is an impossible possibility because it always meets resistance in our encounter with nature. According to Confucius, human beings become moral by integrating themselves into the already meaningful natural order (...)
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  13.  10
    Daryl Koehn (2010). Ethics, Morality, and Art in the Classroom. Journal of Business Ethics Education 7:213-232.
    Scholars are increasingly interested in possible relationships between aesthetics and ethics and in the pedagogical value of art. This paper considers some specific works of art and explores their multi-faceted relation to ethics and morality. I argue that art has both positive and negative relationships to ethics and morality (which I distinguish in a very rough way as the paper progresses). Art works of various sorts may productively be used in the business ethics classroom,but instructors need to keep (...)
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  14.  39
    Andrea Sauchelli (2012). Ethicism and Immoral Cognitivism: Gaut Versus Kieran on Art and Morality. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (3):107-118.
    The aims of this paper are (1) to reconstruct the dialectic between two rival theories on the relation between art and morality, (2) to argue against Berys Gaut’s recent defense of ethicism, and (3) to elaborate some of my critical remarks and propose new considerations in favor of immoralism. To a first approximation, an ethicist maintains that the moral value of a work of art, when relevant, is an important element of its artistic value. In particular, assuming that the (...)
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  15.  8
    Malcolm Budd (2014). Morality, Society, and the Love of Art. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 51 (2):170-207.
    The principal focus of the essay is the idea of artistic value, understood as the value of a work of art as the work of art it is, and the essay explores the connections, if any, between artistic value and a variety of other values in human life. I start with a series of observations about social values and then turn to moral values. Beginning from Goethe’s claim that ‘music cannot affect morality, nor can the other arts, and it (...)
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  16.  11
    Katherine Thomson (2004). Art and Morality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):544 – 547.
    Book Information Art and Morality. Art and Morality José Luis Bermùdez and Sebastian Gardener , London : Routledge , 2003 , 303 , £50 ( cloth ) By José Luis Bermùdez. and Sebastian Gardener. Routledge. London. Pp. 303. £50 (cloth:).
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  17. Stephen Davies (ed.) (2001). Art and its Messages: Meaning, Morality, and Society. Penn State University Press.
    This volume brings together essays by leading philosophers of art who consider what can be learned from the meaning of art about society, morality, and life in general. This subject inevitably leads to discussion of other issues. Is art distinct from life? Is a concern with art's messages consistent with an appropriately aesthetic appreciation of its works? Is there anything distinctive about the manner in which art communicates its messages, or about the messages it conveys? The topic of art's (...)
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  18.  4
    Otfried Höffe (2010). Can Virtue Make Us Happy?: The Art of Living and Morality. Northwestern University Press.
    Ethics plus theory of action -- Thinking the good through -- Fallacious conclusions -- Animal morabile -- Action -- The principle of happiness: eudaimonia -- The happiness of aspiration -- The art of living -- Four life goals -- Virtue -- Prudence, composure, selflessness -- Wisdom rather than calculation -- Does virtue make one happy? -- Euthanasia of morals? -- From an ethic of teleological aspiration to an ethic of the will -- The principle of freedom: autonomy -- Locating moral (...)
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  19. Douglas R. McGaughey (ed.) (2010). Can Virtue Make Us Happy?: The Art of Living and Morality. Northwestern University Press.
    Can one be happy and free, and nonetheless be moral? This question occurs at the core of daily life and is, as well, a question as old as philosophy itself. In _Can Virtue Make Us Happy? The Art of Living and Morality, _Otfried Höffe, one of Europe’s most well-known philosophers, offers a far-reaching and foundational work in philosophical ethics. As long as one understands "happiness" purely as a feeling of subjective well-being, Höffe argues, there is at best only an (...)
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  20.  37
    Paul Crowther (1989). The Kantian Sublime: From Morality to Art. Oxford University Press.
    With this, the first volume in the Oxford Philosophical Monographs series, Paul Crowther breaks new ground by providing what is probably the first study in any language to be devoted exclusively to Kant's theory of the sublime. It fills a gap in an area of scholarship where Kant makes crucial links between morality and aesthetics and will be particularly useful for Continental philosophers, among whom the Kantian sublime is currently receiving widespread discussion in debates about the nature of postmodernism. (...)
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  21. Philippa Foot (1970). Morality and Art. Oxford University Press.
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  22. Henry Ladd (1932). The Victorian Morality of Art an Analysis of Ruskin's Esthetic, by Henry Ladd. R. Long & R.R. Smith, Inc.
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  23.  14
    Peter K. Machamer & George W. Roberts (1968). Art and Morality. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 26 (4):515-519.
  24.  10
    Genia Schönbaumsfeld (2015). Art and the ‘Morality System’: The Case of Don Giovanni. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):1025-1043.
    Mozart's great opera, Don Giovanni, poses a number of significant philosophical and aesthetic challenges, and yet it remains, for the most part, little discussed by contemporary philosophers. A notable exception to this is Bernard Williams's important paper, ‘Don Juan as an Idea’, which contains an illuminating discussion of Kierkegaard's ground-breaking interpretation of the opera, ‘The Immediate Erotic Stages or the Musical-Erotic’, in Either/Or. Kierkegaard's pseudonymous author's approach here is, in some respects, reminiscent of a currently rather fashionable narrative-inspired moral philosophy, (...)
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  25.  14
    Morris Grossman (1973). Art and Morality: On the Ambiguity of a Distinction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (1):103-106.
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  26.  12
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1989). Art's Autonomy is its Morality: A Reply to Casey Haskins on Kant. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):376-377.
  27.  10
    Lorna Collins (2010). Making Restorative Sense with Deleuzian Morality, Art Brut and the Schizophrenic. Deleuze Studies 4 (2):234-255.
    The essay consists of three parts: the first argues that Deleuze's moral philosophy in The Logic of Sense provides an ethical model of counter-actualisation; the second shows how three different practices of art therapy offer a means to effect this counter-actualisation and thereby demonstrate the restorative power of art; the third explores how such a power might form part of what Guattari calls the ‘ethico-aesthetic paradigm’ (Guattari 1995).
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  28.  1
    I. Nakhimovsky (2003). The Enlightened Epicureanism of Jacques Abbadie: L'Art de Se Connoître Soi-Même and the Morality of Self-Interest. History of European Ideas 29 (1):1-14.
    Jacques Abbadie's L’Art de se connoı̂tre soi-même was an influential attempt to describe an alternative to Jansenist moral theory. Abbadie drew upon René Descartes’ theory of the passions in order to arrive at an Epicurean moral theory that was based on the pursuit of happiness as pleasure, but that avoided the materialism of Epicurean physics. In this way, Abbadie was able to distinguish between the natural and legitimate principle of self-love and its corruption, and to argue that genuine moral behaviour (...)
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  29. David A. Dilworth & Valdo H. Viglielmo (1975). Art and Morality. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (2):207-208.
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  30. Wendy Donner (2010). Morality, Virtue and Aesthetics in Mill's Art of Life. In Ben Eggleston, Dale E. Miller & D. Weinstein (eds.), John Stuart Mill and the Art of Life. Oxford University Press
     
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  31. Christopher Dreisbach (1987). The Morality of Art: Collingwood's View. Dissertation, The Johns Hopkins University
    There is something unsatisfactory about the moral condemnation of good works of art: the judgement "that work of art is aesthetically good and morally bad" seems unreasonable. Since the unreasonableness is not one of direct contradiction, it would seem that there must be an indirect contradiction involving a third thing to which aesthetic value and moral value are both connected. ;This dissertation aims to examine this unreasonableness by studying one significant position concerning it. This is the position found by combining (...)
     
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  32. Roman Kubicki (2007). Art and Morality in the World of Cyborgs. Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 9:49-66.
     
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  33. Mark Silcox (2016). Grossman, Morris. Art and Morality: Essays in the Spirit of George Santayana. Fordham University Press, 2014, Xvi + 315 Pp., 3 B&W Illus., $85.00 Cloth, $26.00 Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):110-112.
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  34.  3
    Ciaran Benson (2001). The Cultural Psychology of Self: Place, Morality and Art in Human Worlds. Routledge.
    Philosophers and psychologists both investigate the self, but often in isolation from one another. this book brings together studies by philosophers and psychologists in an exploration of the self and its function. It will be of interest to all those involved in philosophy, psychology and sociology.
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  35. Herbert Ellsworth Cory (1926). Beauty and Goodness: Art and Morality. International Journal of Ethics 36 (4):394-402.
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  36.  16
    Daniel Came (2004). Nietzsche's Attempt at a Self-Criticism: Art and Morality in The Birth of Tragedy. Nietzsche-Studien 33 (1):37-67.
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  37.  56
    Michiel Korthals (1989). Art and Morality: Critical Theory About the Conflict and Harmony Between Art and Morality. Philosophy and Social Criticism 15 (3):241-251.
  38.  53
    Alessandro Giovannelli (2005). Review: Art and Morality. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (453):119-124.
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  39.  33
    C. A. J. Coady & Onora O'Neill (1990). Messy Morality and the Art of the Possible. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 64:259 - 294.
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  40.  8
    Richard Kuhns (1975). That Kant Did Not Complete His Argument Concerning the Relation of Art to Morality and How It Might Be Completed. Idealistic Studies 5 (2):190-206.
  41.  30
    Ruben Berrios (2004). José Luis Bermúdez and Sebastian Gardner, Eds., Art and Morality. New York: Routledge, 2003, 303 Pp. (Indexed). ISBN 0-415-19252-8, US$96.95 (Hb). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (3):419-423.
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  42.  3
    M. R. Haight & R. W. Beardsmore (1973). Art and Morality. Philosophical Quarterly 23 (91):187.
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  43.  7
    Salim Kemal (1991). The Kantian Sublime: From Morality to Art. Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (3):500-502.
  44.  7
    Alicja Kuczyńska & Lech Petrowicz (2012). Art and Morality. Dialectics and Humanism 7 (2):39-49.
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  45.  3
    Robert W. Hall (1990). Art and Morality in Plato: A Reappraisal. Journal of Aesthetic Education 24 (3):5.
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  46.  5
    Lev Kreft (2014). Hedonistic Morality and the Art of Life: Jean-Marie Guyau Revisited. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (2):137-146.
    The aim of this paper is to defend the position that aesthetics and ethics in sport are not two separate domains or aspects. In sport, the aesthetic and the ethical both arise from sport’s attractiveness or from the pleasure sport offers to its activists and consumers. To think about sport philosophically, we should find a link and a principle beyond this division as a source of both the aesthetic and the ethical in sport. The philosophy and philosophical sociology of Jean-Marie (...)
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  47.  16
    John Anderson (1941). Art and Morality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 19 (3):253 – 266.
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  48.  16
    Dinesh C. Mathur (1981). Abhinavagupta and Dewey on Art and its Relation to Morality: Comparisons and Evaluations. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (2):224-235.
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  49. Tom Sorell (1992). Art, Society and Morality. In Oswald Hanfling (ed.), Philosophical Aesthetics: An Introduction. Open University 297--347.
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  50.  8
    Yves R. Simon (1961). On Art and Morality. New Scholasticism 35 (3):338-341.
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