Search results for 'Art and morals' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eliseo Vivas (1935). Art, Morals, and Propaganda. International Journal of Ethics 46 (1):82-95.score: 45.0
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  2. Matthew Kieran (1996). Art, Imagination, and the Cultivation of Morals. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (4):337-351.score: 41.0
  3. Babette Babich, The Genealogy of Morals and Right Reading: On the Nietzschean Aphorism and the Art of the Polemic.score: 39.0
    In: Christa Davis Acampora, ed., Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals: Critical Essays. (Lanham, Md., Rowman & Littlefield, 2006), pp. 177-190.
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  4. José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.) (2003). Art and Morality. Routledge.score: 38.0
    Art and Morality is a collection of groundbreaking new papers on the theme of aesthetics and ethics, and the link between the two subjects. A group of world-class contributors tackle the important question that arise when one thinks about the moral dimensions of art and the aesthetic dimension of moral life. The volume is a significant contribution to the philosophical literature, opening up unexplored questions and shedding new light on more traditional debates in aesthetics. The topics explored include the relation (...)
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  5. Joseph H. Kupfer (2013). Extreme Makeover: Art and Morality in The Shape of Things. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):296-314.score: 38.0
    Many of us might welcome a makeover in our appearance, but how would we feel if it involved being emotionally manipulated in the name of art? The story of a young woman’s reshaping of her boyfriend encourages us to consider whether the creation of art could justify what would otherwise be immoral behavior. For example, do moral considerations always take precedence over other values, such as the aesthetic? The subordinate themes of gender and narrative inform Neil LaBute’s cinematic portrayal of (...)
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  6. Noël Carroll (2002). The Wheel of Virtue: Art, Literature, and Moral Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):3–26.score: 36.0
    In this essay, then, I would like to address what I believe are the most compelling epistemic arguments against the notion that literature (and art more broadly) can function as an instrument of education and a source of knowledge.
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  7. Radhakamal Mukerjee (1950). Morals, the Art of Symbolic Living. Journal of Philosophy 47 (16):453-465.score: 36.0
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  8. Skaidra Trilupaityte (2007). Totalitarianism and the Problem of Soviet Art Evaluation: The Lithuanian Case. Studies in East European Thought 59 (4):261 - 280.score: 36.0
    By taking into account dissident/political and art historical interpretations of Soviet art, I analyze how polemics about totalitarianism in the West, which generally corresponded with Cold War debates and Eastern European dissident thought, shaped the post-Soviet evaluations of national artistic legacies. It is argued that the political relationship with the totalitarian past, like in many post-socialist areas where the immediate past was subjected to radical re-evaluation, affected Lithuanian artists’ and critics’ attitude towards local Soviet art. Because of an obvious lack (...)
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  9. T. E. Wilkerson (1983). Uniqueness in Art and Morals. Philosophy 58 (225):303 - 313.score: 36.0
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  10. Ana Hontanilla (2010). El Gusto de la Razón: Debates de Arte y Moral En El Siglo Xviii Español. Vervuert.score: 36.0
    Aproximación teórica al buen gusto y a los significados que este concepto adquiere en los tratados, más o menos teóricos, de autores españoles y de extranjeros traducidos al español a lo largo del siglo XVIII.
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  11. Matthew Kieran (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value. Philosophy Compass 5 (5):426-431.score: 34.0
    Up until fairly recently it was philosophical orthodoxy – at least within analytic aesthetics broadly construed – to hold that the appreciation and evaluation of works as art and moral considerations pertaining to them are conceptually distinct. However, following on from the idea that artistic value is broader than aesthetic value, the last 15 years has seen an explosion of interest in exploring possible inter-relations between the appreciative and ethical character of works as art. Consideration of these issues has a (...)
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  12. Christopher Dreisbach (2009). Collingwood on the Moral Principles of Art. Susquehanna University Press.score: 33.0
    "This book addresses the apparent contradiction in moral condemnation of good artworks.
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  13. Marjorie Bowen (1939). Ethics in Modern Art. Watts.score: 33.0
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  14. Mysore Hiriyanna (1997). Art Experience. Manohar.score: 33.0
     
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  15. Vishwanath S. Naravane (2000). Creative Stillness: Indian Perspectives on Art & Beauty. Distributors, Lokbharti.score: 33.0
     
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  16. Harold Taylor (1960). Art and the Intellect. New York, Published by the Museum of Modern Art;.score: 33.0
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  17. Donovan Miyasaki (2007). Against the Moral Appraisal of Art: Wayne Booth and the Case of Huck Finn. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):125-32.score: 31.0
    In this essay, I argue that it is sometimes inappropriate to appeal to moral criteria in artistic judgments, even when the moral content of an artwork contributes to its artistic value. I suggest that this is the case with artworks that (1) are “interrogative” in form, posing a question or problem that remains unresolved in the work, and (2) have moral dilemmas as a principal theme. Using Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as an example of morally interrogative artwork, (...)
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  18. Paul Russell (2008). Free Will, Art and Morality. Journal of Ethics 12 (3/4):307 - 325.score: 31.0
    The discussion in this paper begins with some observations regarding a number of structural similarities between art and morality as it involves human agency. On the basis of these observations we may ask whether or not incompatibilist worries about free will are relevant to both art and morality. One approach is to claim that libertarian free will is essential to our evaluations of merit and desert in both spheres. An alternative approach, is to claim that free will is required only (...)
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  19. Rob van Gerwen (2004). Ethical Autonomism. The Work of Art as a Moral Agent. Contemporary Aesthetics 2.score: 30.0
    Much contemporary art seems morally out of control. Yet, philosophers seem to have trouble finding the right way to morally evaluate works of art. The debate between autonomists and moralists, I argue, has turned into a stalemate due to two mistaken assumptions. Against these assumptions, I argue that the moral nature of a work's contents does not transfer to the work and that, if we are to morally evaluate works we should try to conceive of them as moral agents. Ethical (...)
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  20. Andrea Sauchelli, Art and Morality. Oxford Bibliographies Online.score: 30.0
  21. Otfried Höffe (2010). Can Virtue Make Us Happy?: The Art of Living and Morality. Northwestern University Press.score: 30.0
    Ethics plus theory of action -- Thinking the good through -- Fallacious conclusions -- Animal morabile -- Action -- The principle of happiness: eudaimonia -- The happiness of aspiration -- The art of living -- Four life goals -- Virtue -- Prudence, composure, selflessness -- Wisdom rather than calculation -- Does virtue make one happy? -- Euthanasia of morals? -- From an ethic of teleological aspiration to an ethic of the will -- The principle of freedom: autonomy -- Locating (...)
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  22. Matthew Kieran (2003). Art and Morality. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford. 451--470.score: 30.0
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  23. Garry Hagberg (ed.) (2008). Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell.score: 27.0
    A timely and philosophically significant contribution to modern aesthetics featuring some of the best contemporary work in philosophical studies of literature, moral beliefs, and thinking in art Reflects the importance of a moral life of engagement with works of art Forms part of the prestigious New Directions in Aesthetics series, which confronts the most intriguing problems in aesthetics and the philosophy of art today.
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  24. Jenny Chamarette & Jennifer Higgins (eds.) (2010). Guilt and Shame: Essays in French Literature, Thought and Visual Culture. Peter Lang.score: 27.0
    This collection of essays, on French and francophone prose, poetry, drama, visual art, cinema and thought, assesses guilt and shame in relation to structures of ...
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  25. David Rondel (2014). The Moral Consequences of the End of Art. In Vladimir Marchenkov (ed.), Between Histories: Art's Dilemmas and Trajectories. Hampton Press.score: 27.0
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  26. Casey Haskins (2001). Art, Morality, and the Holocaust: The Aesthetic Riddle of Benigni's Life is Beautiful. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (4):373–384.score: 24.0
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  27. Amy Mullin (2002). Evaluating Art: Morally Significant Imagining Versus Moral Soundness. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (2):137–149.score: 24.0
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  28. Jacques Maritain (1960). The Responsibility of the Artist. New York, Scribner.score: 24.0
     
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  29. Berys Nigel Gaut (2007). Art, Emotion and Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 23.0
    The long debate -- Aesthetics and ethics : basic concepts -- A conceptual map -- Autonomism -- Artistic and critical practices -- Questions of character -- The cognitive argument : the epistemic claim -- The cognitive argument : the aesthetic claim -- Emotion and imagination -- The merited response argument.
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  30. Anthony Fisher & Hayden Ramsay (2000). Of Art and Blasphemy. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (2):137-167.score: 22.0
    What does philosophy have to say about the argument that blasphemous art ought not to be publicly displayed? We examine four concepts of blasphemy: blasphemy as offence, attack on religion, attack on the sacred, attack on the blasphemer himself. We argue all four are needed to grasp this complex concept. We also argue for blasphemy as primarily a moral, not a religious concept. We then criticise four arguments for the public display of blasphemous art: it may be beautiful, provocative, devoutly (...)
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  31. Christy Mag Uidhir (2009). Why Pornography Can't Be Art. Philosophy and Literature 33 (1):pp. 193-203.score: 21.0
    Claims that pornography cannot be art typically depend on controversial claims about essential value differences (moral, aesthetic) between pornography and art. In this paper, I offer a value-neutral exclusionary claim, showing pornography to be descriptively at odds with art. I then show how my view is an improvement on similar claims made by Jerrold Levinson. Finally I draw parallels between art and pornography and art and advertising as well as show that my view is consistent with our typical usage of (...)
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  32. Noël Carroll (2000). Art and Ethical Criticism: An Overview of Recent Directions of Research. Ethics 110 (2):350-387.score: 21.0
  33. Nicholas Alden Riggle (2010). Street Art: The Transfiguration of the Commonplaces. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):243-257.score: 21.0
    According to Arthur Danto, post-modern or post-historical art began when artists like Andy Warhol collapsed the Modern distinction between art and everyday life by bringing “the everyday” into the artworld. I begin by pointing out that there is another way to collapse this distinction: bring art out of the artworld and into everyday life. An especially effective way of doing this to make street art, which, I argue, is art whose meaning depends on its use of the street. I defend (...)
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  34. Johan de Smedt & Helen de Cruz (2011). A Cognitive Approach to the Earliest Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):379-389.score: 21.0
    This paper takes a cognitive perspective to assess the significance of some Late Palaeolithic artefacts (sculptures and engraved objects) for philosophicalconcepts of art. We examine cognitive capacities that are necessary to produceand recognize objects that are denoted as art. These include the ability toattribute and infer design (design stance), the ability to distinguish between themateriality of an object and its meaning (symbol-mindedness), and an aesthetic sensitivity to some perceptual stimuli. We investigate to what extent thesecognitive processes played a role in (...)
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  35. Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). Art, Metaphysics, & the Paradox of Standards. In , Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    I consider the field of aesthetics to be at its most productive and engaging when adopting a broadly philosophically informative approach to its core issues (e.g., shaping and testing putative art theoretic commitments against the relevant standard models employed in philosophy of language, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind) and to be at its most impotent and bewildering when cultivating a philosophically insular character (e.g., selecting interpretative, ontological, or conceptual models solely for fit with pre-fixed art theoretic commitments). For example, when (...)
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  36. Christy Mag Uidhir (2012). Photographic Art: An Ontology Fit to Print. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (1):31-42.score: 21.0
    A standard art-ontological position is to construe repeatable artworks as abstract objects that admit multiple concrete instances. Since photographic artworks are putatively repeatable, the ontology of photographic art is by default modelled after standard repeatable-work ontology. I argue, however, that the construal of photographic artworks as abstracta mistakenly ignores photography’s printmaking genealogy, specifically its ontological inheritance. More precisely, I claim that the products of printmaking media (prints) minimally must be construed in a manner consistent with basic print ontology, the most (...)
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  37. Mary Devereaux (2004). Moral Judgments and Works of Art: The Case of Narrative Literature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (1):3–11.score: 21.0
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  38. Aaron Smuts (2013). Painful Art and the Limits of Well-Being. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly. Palgrave/ Macmillan.score: 21.0
    In this chapter I explore what painful art can tell us about the nature and importance of human welfare. My goal is not so much to defend a new solution to the paradox of tragedy, as it is to explore the implications of the kinds of solutions that I find attractive. Both nonhedonic compensatory theories and constitutive theories explain why people seek out painful art, but they have troublesome implications. On some narrow theories of well-being, they imply that painful art (...)
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  39. Jochen Briesen (2014). Pictorial Art and Epistemic Aims. In Harald Klinke (ed.), Art Theory as Visual Epistemology. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 11-28.score: 21.0
    The question whether art is of any epistemic value is an old question in the philosophy of art. Whereas many contemporary artists, art-critics, and art-historians answer this question affirmatively, many contemporary philosophers remain skeptical. If art is of epistemic significance, they maintain, then it has to contribute to our quest of achieving our most basic epistemic aim, namely knowledge.Unfortunately, recent and widely accepted analyses of knowledge make it very hard to see how art might significantly contribute to the quest of (...)
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  40. Mortimer Jerome Adler (1978). Art and Prudence. Arno Press.score: 21.0
    CHAPTER ONE Plato IT is a mark of wisdom in Greek political thought that the form and content of education receive primary consideration from those who are ...
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  41. Lawrence W. Hyman (1989). Art's Autonomy is its Morality: A Reply to Casey Haskins on Kant. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):376-377.score: 21.0
  42. Peter K. Machamer & George W. Roberts (1968). Art and Morality. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 26 (4):515-519.score: 21.0
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  43. Morris Grossman (1973). Art and Morality: On the Ambiguity of a Distinction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (1):103-106.score: 21.0
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  44. Bertram Morris (1955). Ruskin on the Pathetic Fallacy, or on How a Moral Theory of Art May Fail. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (2):248-266.score: 21.0
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  45. Ping-Cheung Lo (2012). The Art of War Corpus and Chinese Just War Ethics Past and Present. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):404-446.score: 21.0
    The idea of “just war” is not alien to Chinese thought. The term “yi zhan” (usually translated as “just war” or “righteous war” in English) is used in Mencius, was renewed by Mao Zedong, and is still being used in China today (zhengyi zhanzheng). The best place to start exploring this Chinese idea is in the enormous Art of War corpus in premodern China, of which the Seven Military Classics is the best representative. This set of treatises served as the (...)
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  46. Ian Rottenberg (2014). Fine Art as Preparation for Christian Love. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):243-262.score: 21.0
    This essay links Jean-Luc Marion's phenomenology of fine art to his description of Christian love. It does so by carefully showing how Marion's overall project is closely related to Kant's well-known account of the relationship between aesthetics and morality. While Kant and Marion both believe that aesthetic experience can lay the groundwork for moral action, their contrasting views of morality lead them to very different articulations of such a relationship. While Kant sees encounters with fine art as preparing individuals for (...)
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  47. Anne D. R. Sheppard (1987). Aesthetics: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Art. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    Why do people read novels, go to the theater, or listen to beautiful music? Do we seek out aesthetic experiences simply because we enjoy them--or is there another, deeper, reason we spend our leisure time viewing or experiencing works of art? Aesthetics, the first short introduction to the contemporary philosophy of aesthetics, examines not just the nature of the aesthetic experience, but the definition of art, and its moral and intrinsic value in our lives. Anne Sheppard divides her work into (...)
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  48. Karl Alfred Blüher (2005). Les origines antiques d'un « art de la prudence » chez Baltasar Gracián. Astérion 3.score: 21.0
    L’article met en évidence que l’« art de la prudence » que Baltasar Gracián propose dans son Oráculo manual renoue avec les méthodes de l’ars vitæ et de la prudentia tactique que les penseurs gréco-latins de l’Antiquité avaient développées, en se servant souvent de formules frappantes, maximes et adages. Les aphorismes de Gracián puisent dans le riche trésor de cette sagesse pragmatique, empruntant tout autant les traits d’un certain stoïcisme que d’habiles conseils d’« adaptation » et de « dissimulation ». (...)
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  49. Iskra Fileva (2013). Playing with Fire: Art and the Seductive Power of Pain. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 21.0
    I discuss the aesthetic power of painful art. I focus on artworks that occasion pain by “hitting too close to home,” i.e., by presenting narratives meant to be “about us.” I consider various reasons why such works may have aesthetic value for us, but I argue that the main reason has to do with the power of such works to transgress conversational boundaries. The discussion is meant as a contribution to the debate on the paradox of tragedy.
     
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  50. Alexander Nehamas (2007). Only a Promise of Happiness: The Place of Beauty in a World of Art. Princeton University Press.score: 21.0
    Neither art nor philosophy was kind to beauty during the twentieth century. Much modern art disdains beauty, and many philosophers deeply suspect that beauty merely paints over or distracts us from horrors. Intellectuals consigned the passions of beauty to the margins, replacing them with the anemic and rarefied alternative, "aesthetic pleasure." In Only a Promise of Happiness , Alexander Nehamas reclaims beauty from its critics. He seeks to restore its place in art, to reestablish the connections among art, beauty, and (...)
     
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