Search results for 'Art and morals' (try it on Scholar)

  1. Richard Francis, Homi K. Bhabha, Yve Alain Bois & Museum of Contemporary Art (1996). Negotiating Rapture the Power of Art to Transform Lives.
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  2. Eliseo Vivas (1935). Art, Morals, and Propaganda. International Journal of Ethics 46 (1):82-95.
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  3. George Boas (1968). Art, Morals, and the Teaching of Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 2 (3):93.
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  4. Eliseo Vivas (1935). Art, Morals, and Propaganda. Ethics 46 (1):82.
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  5. Matthew Kieran (1996). Art, Imagination, and the Cultivation of Morals. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (4):337-351.
  6. Babette Babich, The Genealogy of Morals and Right Reading: On the Nietzschean Aphorism and the Art of the Polemic.
    In: Christa Davis Acampora, ed., Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals: Critical Essays. (Lanham, Md., Rowman & Littlefield, 2006), pp. 177-190.
     
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  7.  2
    T. E. Wilkerson (1983). Uniqueness in Art and Morals. Philosophy 58 (225):303 - 313.
    1. There is an important argument which can be traced back to Kant's second and third Critiques , and which has been defended by a number of distinguished modern philosophers.1 It goes as follows. Moral judgments are universalizable; that is, I am logically committed to making the same moral judgment about all relevantly similar cases. If I refuse to make the same moral judgment about two relevantly similar cases, then either I believe that they are relevantly different, or I have (...)
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  8. Radhakamal Mukerjee (1950). Morals, the Art of Symbolic Living. Journal of Philosophy 47 (16):453-465.
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  9. Aaron Garrett & James A. Harris (eds.) (2015). Scottish Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century, Volume I: Morals, Politics, Art, Religion. OUP Oxford.
    This new history of Scottish philosophy will include two volumes that focus on the Scottish Enlightenment of the eighteenth century. In this first volume, a team of leading experts explore the ideas, intellectual context, and influence of Hutcheson, Hume, Smith, Reid, and many other thinkers.
     
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  10. Edward H. Madden & The Editors (1957). Charles Eliot Norton on Art and Morals. Journal of the History of Ideas 18 (3):430.
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  11.  15
    Skaidra Trilupaityte (2007). Totalitarianism and the Problem of Soviet Art Evaluation: The Lithuanian Case. Studies in East European Thought 59 (4):261 - 280.
    By taking into account dissident/political and art historical interpretations of Soviet art, I analyze how polemics about totalitarianism in the West, which generally corresponded with Cold War debates and Eastern European dissident thought, shaped the post-Soviet evaluations of national artistic legacies. It is argued that the political relationship with the totalitarian past, like in many post-socialist areas where the immediate past was subjected to radical re-evaluation, affected Lithuanian artists’ and critics’ attitude towards local Soviet art. Because of an obvious lack (...)
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  12. Harold Taylor (1961). Art and the Intellect; Moral Values and the Experience of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 20 (2):215-215.
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  13. Marjorie Bowen (1939). Ethics in Modern Art. Watts.
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  14. Philippa Foot (1970). Morality and Art. Oxford University Press.
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  15. Mysore Hiriyanna (1997). Art Experience. Manohar.
     
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  16. Henry Ladd (1932). The Victorian Morality of Art an Analysis of Ruskin's Esthetic, by Henry Ladd. R. Long & R.R. Smith, Inc.
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  17. Vishwanath S. Naravane (2000). Creative Stillness: Indian Perspectives on Art & Beauty. Distributors, Lokbharti.
     
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  18. Harold Taylor (1960). Art and the Intellect. New York, Published by the Museum of Modern Art;.
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  19.  7
    Anne D. R. Sheppard (1987). Aesthetics: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Art. Oxford University Press.
    Why do people read novels, go to the theater, or listen to beautiful music? Do we seek out aesthetic experiences simply because we enjoy them--or is there another, deeper, reason we spend our leisure time viewing or experiencing works of art? Aesthetics, the first short introduction to the contemporary philosophy of aesthetics, examines not just the nature of the aesthetic experience, but the definition of art, and its moral and intrinsic value in our lives. Anne Sheppard divides her work into (...)
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  20.  17
    Stephen Davies (2015). How Ancient is Art? Evental Aesthetics 4 (2):22-45.
    In this paper I suggest that music and dance of an artful kind could pre-date the emergence of our species by several hundred thousand years. Our progenitor, H. heidelbergensis, had the necessary physiological resources and social capacities. And she inherited older modes of moving and vocalizing that could have laid the foundations for dance and music. Admittedly, for her, these artistic activities would have been more about sharing and expressing emotions than about symbolizing abstract ideas or conveying complex thoughts. But (...)
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  21.  2
    Donald A. Landes (2016). Spielraum, Phenomenology, and the Art of Virtue: Hints of an ‘Embodied’ Ethics in Kant. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (2):234-251.
    Although the suggestion that Kant offers a significant contribution to Virtue Ethics might be a surprising one, in The Metaphysics of Morals Kant makes virtue central to his ethics. In this paper, I introduce a Merleau-Pontian phenomenological perspective into the ongoing study of the convergence between Kant and Virtue Ethics, and argue that such a perspective promises to illuminate the continuity of Kant’s thought through an emphasis on the implicit structure of moral experience, revealing the insights his perspective contains (...)
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  22.  15
    Malgorzata A. Szyszkowska (2010). Messages in Art and Music: On Route to Understanding Musical Works with Jerrold Levinson. Dialogue and Universalism 20 (3-4):97.
    In his article untitled Messages in Art Jerrold Levinson discusses the idea of a message behind a work of art. He argues that despite certain disclaimers put forward by artists it is „hard to deny that artworks (...) very often do have messages, and far from inexpressible ones”. From given examples it would seem that Levinson assumes that musical work just as other artworks sometimes generate messages and that in order for a work of music to be successful in expression (...)
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  23.  8
    John T. Wilcox (1997). What Aphorism Does Nietzsche Explicate in Genealogy of Morals, Essay III? Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):593-610.
    What Aphorism Does Nietzsche Explicate in Genealogy of Morals, Essay III ? JOHN T. WILCOX A picture held us captive. Wittgenstein ~ AS EVERYONE KNOWS, the dominant opinion is not always correct. Current scholarship, in all likelihood, makes assumptions which have not yet been questioned; and probably some of them will be seen to be false, once they have been examined. I will argue here that there is a dominant but erroneous assumption concerning the Third Essay in Nietzsche's On (...)
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  24.  2
    María José Alcaraz León (2011). Contrary Feelings and Ticognitive Significance of Art. Estetika 48 (1):62-80.
    Emotional response to artworks as a source of moral training or experimentation has long been disputed in the history of aesthetics. In this article I address the matter by focusing upon a kind of specimen that may by especially troublesome for an advocate of art’s capacity to educate our sentiments. The cases I focus upon – which I place under the label of the asymmetry problem – are those in which our emotional or evaluative response seems contrary to the one (...)
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  25.  23
    Jenny Chamarette & Jennifer Higgins (eds.) (2010). Guilt and Shame: Essays in French Literature, Thought and Visual Culture. Peter Lang.
    This collection of essays, on French and francophone prose, poetry, drama, visual art, cinema and thought, assesses guilt and shame in relation to structures of ...
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  26. Timothy M. Costelloe (2009). Aesthetics and Morals in the Philosophy of David Hume. Routledge.
    The book has two aims. First, to examine the extent and significance of the connection between Hume's aesthetics and his moral philosophy; and, second, to consider how, in light of the connection, his moral philosophy answers central questions in ethics. The first aim is realized in chapters 1-4. Chapter 1 examines Hume's essay "Of the Standard of Taste" to understand his search for a "standard" and how this affects the scope of his aesthetics. Chapter 2 establishes that he treats beauty (...)
     
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  27. Timothy M. Costelloe (2013). Aesthetics and Morals in the Philosophy of David Hume. Routledge.
    The book has two aims. First, to examine the extent and significance of the connection between Hume's aesthetics and his moral philosophy; and, second, to consider how, in light of the connection, his moral philosophy answers central questions in ethics. The first aim is realized in chapters 1-4. Chapter 1 examines Hume's essay "Of the Standard of Taste" to understand his search for a "standard" and how this affects the scope of his aesthetics. Chapter 2 establishes that he treats beauty (...)
     
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  28.  5
    Otfried Höffe (2010). Can Virtue Make Us Happy?: The Art of Living and Morality. Northwestern University Press.
    Ethics plus theory of action -- Thinking the good through -- Fallacious conclusions -- Animal morabile -- Action -- The principle of happiness: eudaimonia -- The happiness of aspiration -- The art of living -- Four life goals -- Virtue -- Prudence, composure, selflessness -- Wisdom rather than calculation -- Does virtue make one happy? -- Euthanasia of morals? -- From an ethic of teleological aspiration to an ethic of the will -- The principle of freedom: autonomy -- Locating (...)
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  29. Arto Haapala & Oiva Kuisma (2003). Aesthetic Experience and the Ethical Dimension Essays on Moral Prblems in Aesthetics. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  30. Howard Hannay (1937). Roger Fry and Other Essays. G. Allen & Unwin, Ltd.
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  31. Ana Hontanilla (2010). El Gusto de la Razón: Debates de Arte y Moral En El Siglo Xviii Español. Vervuert.
    Aproximación teórica al buen gusto y a los significados que este concepto adquiere en los tratados, más o menos teóricos, de autores españoles y de extranjeros traducidos al español a lo largo del siglo XVIII.
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  32. Jacques Maritain & Georges Brazzola (1961). La Responsabilité de L'Artiste. A. Fayard.
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  33. Jacques Maritain (1960). The Responsibility of the Artist. New York, Scribner.
     
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  34. Leo Tolstoy (2005). What is Art? Barnes & Noble Books.
     
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  35.  23
    D. W. Zaidel & M. Nadal (2011). Brain Intersections of Aesthetics and Morals Perspectives From Biology, Neuroscience, and Evolution. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (3):367-380.
    Human aesthetic experiences are pervasive; they are triggered by faces, art, natural scenery, foods, ideas, theories, and decision-making situations, among many sources, and seem to be a distinctive trait of our species. Our moral sense, understood as our capacity to judge events, actions, or people as good or bad, appropriate or inappropriate, also seems to be an exclusively human endowment (Ayala 2010). As part of the scientific efforts to characterize the biological foundations of our human uniqueness, recently there has been (...)
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  36.  49
    Christopher Williams (2010). Aesthetics and Morals in the Philosophy of David Hume. Hume Studies 36 (1):109-113.
    In the opening chapter of this book, Timothy Costelloe develops an interpretation of Hume's doctrines in "Of the Standard of Taste" and then proceeds, in the second chapter, by extending that interpretation to Hume's moral philosophy. According to Costelloe, the "real value" of his attempt to clarify Hume's essay is to be found in the broader application. But since that value will not be real unless the interpretation of the essay has merit, the first chapter is clearly vital to the (...)
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  37.  61
    Brian Leiter (ed.) (2001). Objectivity in Law and Morals. Cambridge University Press.
    The seven original essays included in this volume, written by some of the world's most distinguished moral and legal philosophers, offer a sophisticated perspective on issues about the objectivity of legal interpretation and judicial decision-making. They examine objectivity from both metaphysical and epistemological perspectives and develop a variety of approaches, constructive and critical, to the fundamental problems of objectivity in morality. One of the key issues explored is that of the alleged 'domain-specificity' of conceptions of objectivity, i.e. whether there is (...)
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  38.  20
    James Shelley (2010). Aesthetics and Morals in the Philosophy of David Hume by Costelloe, Timothy. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):411-413.
  39.  6
    Max Hamburger (1965). Morals and Law. New York, Biblo and Tannen.
    Consequently, as shown above, Celsus, the Roman lawyer, defined law as the art of equity, and the classical Roman lawyers displayed the spirit of the right ...
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  40.  21
    Denis Dutton (2009). The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, & Human Evolution. Bloomsbury Press.
    Introduction -- Landscape and longing -- Art and human nature -- What is art? -- But they don't have our concept of art -- Art and natural selection -- The uses of fiction -- Art and human self-domestication -- Intention, forgery, dada : three aesthetic problems -- The contingency of aesthetic values -- Greatness in the arts.
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  41.  5
    Alexander Nehamas (2007). Only a Promise of Happiness: The Place of Beauty in a World of Art. Princeton University Press.
    Neither art nor philosophy was kind to beauty during the twentieth century. Much modern art disdains beauty, and many philosophers deeply suspect that beauty merely paints over or distracts us from horrors. Intellectuals consigned the passions of beauty to the margins, replacing them with the anemic and rarefied alternative, "aesthetic pleasure." In Only a Promise of Happiness , Alexander Nehamas reclaims beauty from its critics. He seeks to restore its place in art, to reestablish the connections among art, beauty, and (...)
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  42. Johan de Smedt & Helen de Cruz (2011). A Cognitive Approach to the Earliest Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):379-389.
    This paper takes a cognitive perspective to assess the significance of some Late Palaeolithic artefacts (sculptures and engraved objects) for philosophicalconcepts of art. We examine cognitive capacities that are necessary to produceand recognize objects that are denoted as art. These include the ability toattribute and infer design (design stance), the ability to distinguish between themateriality of an object and its meaning (symbol-mindedness), and an aesthetic sensitivity to some perceptual stimuli. We investigate to what extent thesecognitive processes played a role in (...)
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  43. Noël Carroll (2002). The Wheel of Virtue: Art, Literature, and Moral Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):3–26.
    In this essay, then, I would like to address what I believe are the most compelling epistemic arguments against the notion that literature (and art more broadly) can function as an instrument of education and a source of knowledge.
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  44. Paisley Livingston (2005). Art and Intention: A Philosophical Study. Oxford University Press.
    In Art and intention Paisley Livingston develops a broad and balanced perspective on perennial disputes between intentionalists and anti-intentionalists in philosophical aesthetics and critical theory. He surveys and assesses a wide range of rival assumptions about the nature of intentions and the status of intentionalist psychology. With detailed reference to examples from diverse media, art forms, and traditions, he demonstrates that insights into the multiple functions of intentions have important implications for our understanding of artistic creation and authorship, the ontology (...)
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  45.  32
    Mari Mikkola (2013). Pornography, Art and Porno-Art. In Hans Maes (ed.), Pornographic Art and the Aesthetics of Pornography. Palgrave Macmillan 27.
    Philosophers involved in the ‘porn-or-art’ debates standardly assume that pornography is centrally about sexual arousal, while art is about something else. I argue against this assumption and for the view that there is no single thing that pornography (or art) ‘is about’. This suggests that there is no prima facie reason for claiming that some x cannot be both pornography and art. I further go on to develop an understanding of (what I call) ‘porno-art’ - a wholly new kind of (...)
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  46. Nick Riggle (2010). Street Art: The Transfiguration of the Commonplaces. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):243-257.
    According to Arthur Danto, post-modern or post-historical art began when artists like Andy Warhol collapsed the Modern distinction between art and everyday life by bringing “the everyday” into the artworld. I begin by pointing out that there is another way to collapse this distinction: bring art out of the artworld and into everyday life. An especially effective way of doing this is to make street art, which, I argue, is art whose meaning depends on its use of the street. I (...)
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  47.  60
    Matthew Kieran (2005). Revealing Art. Routledge.
    Why does art matter to us, and what makes good art? Why is the role of imagination so important in art? Illustrated with carefully chosen color and black-and-white plates of examples from Michelangelo to Matisse and Poussin to Jackson Pollock, Revealing Art explores some of the most important questions we can ask about art. Matthew Kieran clearly but forcefully asks how art inspires us and disgusts us and whether artistic judgment is simply a matter of taste, and if art can (...)
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  48.  7
    Arthur C. Danto (1998). After the End of Art: Contemporary Art and the Pale of History. Princeton University Press.
    Over a decade ago, Arthur Danto announced that art ended in the sixties. Ever since this declaration, he has been at the forefront of a radical critique of the nature of art in our time. After the End of Art presents Danto's first full-scale reformulation of his original insight, showing how, with the eclipse of abstract expressionism, art has deviated irrevocably from the narrative course that Vasari helped define for it in the Renaissance. Moreover, he leads the way to a (...)
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  49. José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.) (2003). Art and Morality. Routledge.
    Art and Morality is a collection of groundbreaking new papers on the theme of aesthetics and ethics, and the link between the two subjects. A group of world-class contributors tackle the important question that arise when one thinks about the moral dimensions of art and the aesthetic dimension of moral life. The volume is a significant contribution to the philosophical literature, opening up unexplored questions and shedding new light on more traditional debates in aesthetics. The topics explored include the relation (...)
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  50.  84
    Jochen Briesen (2014). Pictorial Art and Epistemic Aims. In Harald Klinke (ed.), Art Theory as Visual Epistemology. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 11-28.
    The question whether art is of any epistemic value is an old question in the philosophy of art. Whereas many contemporary artists, art-critics, and art-historians answer this question affirmatively, many contemporary philosophers remain skeptical. If art is of epistemic significance, they maintain, then it has to contribute to our quest of achieving our most basic epistemic aim, namely knowledge.Unfortunately, recent and widely accepted analyses of knowledge make it very hard to see how art might significantly contribute to the quest of (...)
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