Search results for 'Art and morals. [from old catalog' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. D. C. Kurtz, New Orleans Museum of Art & H. A. Shapiro (1983). Art, Myth and Culture: Greek Vases From Southern Collections. Journal of Hellenic Studies 103:220.score: 390.0
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  2. Harold Taylor (1960). Art and the Intellect. New York, Published by the Museum of Modern Art;.score: 163.8
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  3. Jerome[from old catalog] Stolnitz (1960). Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art Criticism. Boston, Houghton Mifflin.score: 138.6
     
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  4. Mary Jeanne[from old catalog] File (1958). A Critical Analysis of Current Concepts of Art in American Higher Education. Washington, Catholic University of America Press.score: 137.4
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  5. Evelyn[from old catalog] Hay (1942). Greek Spirituality. Essex, the C.W. Daniel Company Ltd..score: 129.6
     
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  6. William Vincent Evans (1939). Belief and Art. [Chicago].score: 108.6
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  7. T. E. Hulme (1961). Speculations. New York, Harcourt, Brace.score: 102.6
    . Ill BERGSONS THEORY OF ART . . .141 THE PHILOSOPHY OF INTENSIVE MANIFOLDS I I CINDERS ..... 215 APPENDICES A. REFLECTIONS ON VIOLENCE . . 249 B. PLAN FOR A ...
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  8. Henry Charles Link (1947). The Rediscovery of Morals. New York, E. P. Dutton & Company, Inc..score: 66.6
     
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  9. Lucia Nixon (2007). Art and Archaeology (B.J.) Hayden Ed. Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete 1–3 (1: Catalogue of Pottery From the Bronze and Early Iron Age Settlement of Vrokastro in the Collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and the Archaeological Museum, Herakleion, Crete; 2: The Settlement History of the Vrokastro Area and Related Studies; 3: The Vrokastro Regional Survey Project: Sites and Pottery). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 2003–2005. Vol.1: Pp. Xiv + 177, Illus. $59.95. 9781931707268. Vol.2: Pp. Xxiv + 512, Illus. + CD. $95. 9781931707596. Vol.3: Pp. Xviii + 269, Illus. + CD. $75. 9781931707794. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:210-.score: 66.0
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  10. Judith Oliver (1983). Jane Hayward and Walter Cahn, Et Al., Radiance and Reflection: Medieval Art From the Raymond Pitcairn Collection. Catalogue of Exhibit at The Cloisters, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 25 February-15 September 1982. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1982. Paper. Pp. 261; 16 Color Plates, 169 Black-and-White Plates. $25. [REVIEW] Speculum 58 (4):1120-1121.score: 66.0
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  11. David Buckton (1998). Helen C. Evans and William D. Wixom, Eds., The Glory of Byzantium: Art and Culture of the Middle Byzantine Era, A.D. 843–1261. Catalogue Accompanying the Exhibition “The Glory of Byzantium” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art From March 11 Through July 6, 1997. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1997. Pp. Xxviii, 574; Color Frontispiece, Plans, 1 Map, and Many Black-and-White and Color Figures. $85. Distributed by Harry N. Abrams, Inc., New York. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (4):1134-1136.score: 66.0
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  12. David Hunt (1989). Mischievous Digging Elizabeth Goring: A Mischievous Pastime. Digging in Cyprus in the Nineteenth Century. With a Catalogue of the Exhibition 'Aphrodite's Island: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Cyprus' Held in the Royal Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh From 14 April to 4 September 1988. Pp. Viii + 98; 120 Illustrations. Edinburgh. National Museums of Scotland in Association with the Bank of Cyprus Cultural Foundation, 1988. Paper, £6.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (01):111-112.score: 66.0
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  13. Edgar Frederick[from old catalog] Carritt (1935). Morals and Politics: Theories of Their Relation From Hobbes and Spinoza to Marx and Bosanquet. Oxford, the Clarendon Press.score: 64.8
  14. David Carrier (2001). Art Museums, Old Paintings, and Our Knowledge of the Past. History and Theory 40 (2):170–189.score: 63.0
    Art museums frequently remove old paintings from their original settings. In the process, the context of these works of art changes dramatically. Do museums then preserve works of art? To answer this question, I consider an imaginary painting, The Travels and Tribulations of Piero's Baptism of Christ, depicting the history of display of Piero della Francesca's Baptism of Christ. This example suggests that how Piero's painting is seen does depend upon its setting. According to the Intentionalist, such changes in context (...)
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  15. Maggie Nelson & Evan Lavender-Smith (2011). The Fragment as a Unit of Prose Composition. Continent 1 (3):158-170.score: 58.2
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  16. Ben Segal (2011). The Official Catalog of Potential Literature Selections. Continent 1 (2):136-140.score: 57.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 136-140. In early 2011, Cow Heavy Books published The Official Catalog of the Library of Potential Literature , a compendium of catalog 'blurbs' for non-existent desired or ideal texts. Along with Erinrose Mager, I edited the project, in a process that was more like curation as it mainly entailed asking a range of contemporary writers, theorists, and text-makers to send us an entry. What resulted was a creative/critical hybrid anthology, a small book in which each (...)
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  17. Paul Crowther (1993). Art and Embodiment: From Aesthetics to Self-Consciousness. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    In his Critical Aesthetics and Postmodernism, Paul Crowther argued that art and aesthetic experiences have the capacity to humanize. In Art and Embodiment he develops this theme in much greater depth, arguing that art can bridge the gap between philosophy's traditional striving for generality and completeness, and the concreteness and contingency of humanity's basic relation to the world. As the key element in his theory, he proposes an ecological definition of art. His strategy involves first mapping out and analyzing the (...)
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  18. Francis Halsall, Julia Jansen & Tony O'Connor (eds.) (2009). Rediscovering Aesthetics: Transdisciplinary Voices From Art History, Philosophy, and Art Practice. Stanford University Press.score: 54.0
    Rediscovering Aesthetics brings together prominent international voices from art history, philosophy and artistic practice who reflect on current notions, ...
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  19. Raamy Majeed (forthcoming). From Zombie Art to Dead Art. Think.score: 54.0
    Zombie art, or salvage art, are artworks that are damaged beyond repair, deemed ‘no-longer-art’ by insurance companies, and removed from the market and stored at claims inventories due to their purported loss of value. This paper aims to make sense of the notion of zombie art. It then aims to determine whether artefacts that fall under this concept retain any aesthetic value, and whether they can genuinely cease being artworks, i.e. be dead art.
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  20. Eric R. Kandel (2011). The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind, and Brain: From Vienna 1900 to the Present. Random House.score: 54.0
    A psychoanalytic psychology and art of unconscious emotion -- An inward turn : Vienna 1900 -- Exploring the truths hidden beneath the surface : origins of a scientific medicine -- Viennese artists, writers, and scientists meet in the Zuckerkandl Salon -- Exploring the brain beneath the skull : origins of a scientific psychiatry -- Exploring mind together with the brain : the development of a brain-based psychology -- Exploring mind apart from the brain : origins of a dynamic psychology -- (...)
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  21. Alexa Miller, Michelle Grohe, Shahram Khoshbin & Joel T. Katz (2013). From the Galleries to the Clinic: Applying Art Museum Lessons to Patient Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (4):433-438.score: 54.0
    Increasingly, medical educators integrate art-viewing into curricular interventions that teach clinical observation—often with local art museum educators. How can cross-disciplinary collaborators explicitly connect the skills learned in the art museum with those used at the bedside? One approach is for educators to align their pedagogical approach using similar teaching methods in the separate contexts of the galleries and the clinic. We describe two linked pedagogical exercises—Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) in the museum galleries and observation at the bedside—from “Training the Eye: (...)
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  22. Paul Palmarossa (2006). From Principles to Profit: The Art of Moral Management. Arcturus.score: 53.0
     
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  23. Michael A. Slote (2001). Morals From Motives. Oxford University Press.score: 52.8
    Morals from Motives develops a virtue ethics inspired more by Hume and Hutcheson's moral sentimentalism than by recently-influential Aristotelianism. It argues that a reconfigured and expanded "morality of caring" can offer a general account of right and wrong action as well as social justice. Expanding the frontiers of ethics, it goes on to show how a motive-based "pure" virtue theory can also help us to understand the nature of human well-being and practical reason.
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  24. Paul Crowther (1989). The Kantian Sublime: From Morality to Art. Oxford University Press.score: 52.0
    With this, the first volume in the Oxford Philosophical Monographs series, Paul Crowther breaks new ground by providing what is probably the first study in any language to be devoted exclusively to Kant's theory of the sublime. It fills a gap in an area of scholarship where Kant makes crucial links between morality and aesthetics and will be particularly useful for Continental philosophers, among whom the Kantian sublime is currently receiving widespread discussion in debates about the nature of postmodernism. Crowther's (...)
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  25. Mary A. McCloskey (1990). The Kantian Sublime: From Morality to Art By Paul Crowther Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1989, X + 178 Pp., £22.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 65 (253):380-.score: 51.0
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  26. Sonia Sedivy (2014). Art From a Wittgensteinian Perspective: Constitutive Norms in Context. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (1):67-82.score: 51.0
    This article offers a detailed textual reexamination of the ‘family resemblance’ passages to reconsider their implications for understanding art. The reassessment takes into account their broader context in the Philosophical Investigations, including the rule following considerations, and draws on a realist interpretive framework associated principally with the work of Cavell, Diamond, McDowell, and Putnam. Wittgensteinian “realism with a human face” helps us discern that the primary issue is not whether certain concepts are definable, posing a stark opposition between essentialism and (...)
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  27. Salim Kemal (1991). The Kantian Sublime: From Morality to Art (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (3):500-502.score: 51.0
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  28. R. Ragghianti (1995). Gleanings From Croce, Benedetto on the 100th-Anniversary of The'revue de Metaphysique Et Morale'-Selected Correspondence by Croce and Others and a Resume of a 1908 Croce Lecture on Pure Intuition and the Lyrical Quality of Art. [REVIEW] Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 15 (1):65-98.score: 51.0
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  29. Eva Schaper (1991). The Kantian Sublime: From Morality to Art. Philosophical Books 32 (2):85-86.score: 51.0
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  30. Eero Tarasti (1998). From Aesthetics to Ethics: Semiotic Observations on the Moral Aspects of Art, Especially Music. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 62:363-374.score: 51.0
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  31. David Roberts (2006). Staging the Absolute: The Total Work of Art From Wagner to Mallarmé. Thesis Eleven 86 (1):90-106.score: 49.2
    Heidegger places Wagner’s will to the total work of art at the centre of the long 19th century. Nietzsche’s and Mallarmé’s responses to Wagner reflect all the ambiguities of modernism’s myth of absolute creation: the dreams of a new mythology and a new community are shadowed by the knowledge that the gods are nothing more than our fictions. Nietzsche and Mallarmé continue and critically interrogate the two distinct lineages of the total work of art deriving from German romanticism and the (...)
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  32. David Carrier (2002). Rosalind Krauss and American Philosophical Art Criticism: From Formalism to Beyond Postmodernism. Praeger.score: 48.6
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction: The Rise of Philosophical Art Criticism 1 -- Chapter 1. In the Beginning Was Formalism 17 -- Chapter 2. The Structuralist Adventure 33 -- Chapter 3. The Historicist, Antiessentialist Definition of Art 55 -- Chapter 4. Resentment and Its Discontents 71 -- Chapter 5. The Deconstruction of Structuralism 87 -- Afterword: The Fate of Philosophical Art Criticism 111.
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  33. Anjan Chakravartty, Truth and Representation in Science: Two Inspirations From Art.score: 48.0
    Realists regarding scientific knowledge – those who think that our best scientific representations truly describe both observable and unobservable aspects of the natural world – have special need of a notion of approximate truth. Since theories and models are rarely considered true simpliciter, the realist requires some means of making sense of the claim that they may be false and yet close to the truth, and increasingly so over time. In this paper, I suggest that traditional approaches to approximate truth (...)
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  34. Simon O'Sullivan (2009). From Stuttering and Stammering to the Diagram: Deleuze, Bacon and Contemporary Art Practice. Deleuze Studies 3 (2):247-258.score: 48.0
    This article attends to Deleuze and Guattari's idea of a ‘minor literature’ as well as to Deleuze's concepts of the figural, probe-heads and the diagram in relation to Bacon's paintings. The paper asks specifically what might be usefully taken from this Deleuze–Bacon encounter for the expanded field of contemporary art practice.
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  35. Jussi Suikkanen (2013). Thomas Hurka's Drawing Morals - Essays in Moral Theory, The Best Things in Life, and (Ed.) Underivative Duty - British Moral Philosophers From Sidgwick to Ewing. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 33 (1):44-48.score: 48.0
    This is a review of three books by Thomas Hurka. The first one, Drawing Morals - Essays in Ethical Theory, is a collection of Hurka's previously published articles. The second one, The Best Things in Life, is a short book on happiness, pleasure and love intended for the general audience. Finally, the third book, Underivative Duty is a collection of articles edited by Hurka on British Moral Philosophers from Sidgwick to Ewing.
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  36. Ingrid Scheibler (1999). Effective History and the End of Art: From Nietzsche to Danto. Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (6):1-28.score: 48.0
    This article takes its shape from a recent conference at the School of Visual Arts in NYC on the theme, 'Tradition and the New: Educating the Artist for the Millennium'. Central to the way the conference was advertised and described was an implicit tendency to view tradition as wholly separate from the new. While the conference did not itself make a theoretical argument for the opposition of tradition and the new, Arthur Danto's recent elaboration of a thesis of the 'end (...)
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  37. Gábor Bács & János Tőzsér (2012). The Works of Art From the Philosophically Innocent Point of View. Hungarian Philosophical Review 57 (4):7-17.score: 48.0
    the Mona Lisa, the Mondscheinsonate, the Chanson d’automne are works of art, the salt shaker on your table, the car in your garage, or the pijamas on your bed are not. the basic question of the metaphysics of works of art is this: what makes a thing a work of art? that is: what sort of property do works of art have in virtue of which they are works of art? or more simply: what sort of property being a work (...)
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  38. Eleonora Barbieri Masini (1994). Introduction to the Special Issue on Art and Science: Studies From the World Academy of Art and Science. World Futures 40 (1):1-1.score: 48.0
    (1994). Introduction to the special issue on art and science: Studies from the world academy of art and science. World Futures: Vol. 40, Art and Science: Studies from the World Academy of Art and Science, pp. 1-1.
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  39. David James (2007). The Transition From Art to Religion in Hegel's Theory of Absolute Spirit. Dialogue 46 (2):265-286.score: 48.0
    I relate the aesthetic mediation of reason and the identity of religion and mythology found in the Earliest System-Programme of German Idealism to Hegel’s account of the transition from the ancient Greek religion of art to the revealed religion (Christianity) in his theory ofabsolute spirit. While this transition turns on the idea that the revealed religion mediates reason more adequately in virtue of its form (i. e., representational thought), I argue that Hegel’s account of the limitations of religious representational thought, (...)
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  40. Christian Hick (1999). The Art of Perception: From the Life World to the Medical Gaze and Back Again. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):129-140.score: 48.0
    Perceptions are often merely regarded as the basic elements of knowledge. They have, however, a complex structure of their own and are far from being elementary. My paper will analyze two basic patterns of perception and some of the resulting medical implications. Most basically, all object perception is characterized by a mixture of knowledge and ignorance (Husserl). Perception essentially perceives with inner and outer horizons, brought about by the kinesthetic activity of the perceiving subject (Sartre). This first layer of perceptual (...)
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  41. Jin Baek (2008). From the "Topos of Nothingness" to the "Space of Transparency": Kitarō Nishida's Notion of Shintai and Its Influence on Art and Architecture (Part 1). Philosophy East and West 58 (1):83 - 107.score: 48.0
    In his philosophy of nothingness, Kitarō Nishida illuminates the matrix of transformation of the world "from the Created to the Creating" (tsukuru mono kara tsukurareta mono e) through shintai, or the body. In this matrix, shintai enters into the stage of an action-sensation continuum and emerges as the immaculate iconic tool of nothingness to create new figures as extended self. This idea of shintai has resonance with the development of postwar art in Japan. The "Space of Transparency" put forth by (...)
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  42. Okot P'Bitek (1986). Artist, the Ruler: Essays on Art, Culture, and Values, Including Extracts From Song of Soldier and White Teeth Make People Laugh on Earth. Heinemann Kenya.score: 48.0
    Essays on Art, Culture, and Values, Including Extracts from Song of Soldier and White Teeth Make People Laugh on Earth Okot p'Bitek. promulgates his edicts, rules, decrees and laws is discussed. Then there is a new definition of Culture ...
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  43. Eva Kit Wah Man (2007). Rethinking Art and Values: A Comparative Revelation of the Origin of Aesthetic Experience (From the Neo-Confucian Perspectives). Filozofski Vestnik 2.score: 48.0
    In his article, "The End of Aesthetic Experience" (1997) Richard Shusterman studies the contemporary fate of aesthetic experience, which has long been regarded as one of the core concepts of Western aesthetics till the last half century. It has then expanded into an umbrella concept for aesthetic notions such as the sublime and the picturesque. I agree with Shusterman that aesthetic experience has become the island of freedom, beauty, and idealistic meaning in an otherwise cold materialistic and law-determined world. My (...)
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  44. Russell J. A. Kilbourn (2010). Cinema, Memory, Modernity: The Representation of Memory From the Art Film to Transnational Cinema. Routledge.score: 48.0
    Introduction : cinema, memory, modernity: the return of memory as film -- No escape from time : memory and redemption in the international postwar art film -- The "crisis" of memory : "traumatic identity" in the contemporary memory film -- "Global memory" : cinema as lingua franca and the commodification of the image -- The eye of history : memory, surveillance and ethicality in the contemporary art film -- "Prosthetic memory" and transnational cinema : globalized identity and narrative recursivity in (...)
     
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  45. William Koch, Opening a World: From Categorial Intuition to Art.score: 48.0
    My purpose, broadly construed, is a simple one; to interpret Heidegger's "The Origin of the Work of Art" in the light of his early work on the nature of phenomenology and philosophy. My method will therefore be to present certain key elements of Heidegger's early understanding of phenomenology and philosophy, and then to trace these elements, and certain challenges which arise from them, into their development in Being and Time. Following this I will enquire into how these considerations should guide (...)
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  46. Matthew Kieran (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value. Philosophy Compass 5 (5):426-431.score: 46.6
    Up until fairly recently it was philosophical orthodoxy – at least within analytic aesthetics broadly construed – to hold that the appreciation and evaluation of works as art and moral considerations pertaining to them are conceptually distinct. However, following on from the idea that artistic value is broader than aesthetic value, the last 15 years has seen an explosion of interest in exploring possible inter-relations between the appreciative and ethical character of works as art. Consideration of these issues has a (...)
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  47. Otfried Höffe (2010). Can Virtue Make Us Happy?: The Art of Living and Morality. Northwestern University Press.score: 46.2
    Ethics plus theory of action -- Thinking the good through -- Fallacious conclusions -- Animal morabile -- Action -- The principle of happiness: eudaimonia -- The happiness of aspiration -- The art of living -- Four life goals -- Virtue -- Prudence, composure, selflessness -- Wisdom rather than calculation -- Does virtue make one happy? -- Euthanasia of morals? -- From an ethic of teleological aspiration to an ethic of the will -- The principle of freedom: autonomy -- Locating moral (...)
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  48. Patrick Kane (2010). Egyptian Art Institutions and Art Education From 1908 to 1951. Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (3):43-68.score: 45.6
    The State, envisioning a social function reserved for the fine arts, is engaged in driving the artistic destinies of the country. These politics were imposed as the example of a religion of the state. . . . But the slow instruction of the masses that has endured since 1908 deviated from the interest of our artists that was formed in the course of these twenty-three years.The cooperative movement began in Egypt in 1908, but up to now it has not taken (...)
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  49. Simon Fokt (2012). Pornographic Art - A Case From Definitions. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (3):287-300.score: 45.0
    On the whole, neither those who hold that pornography can never be art nor their opponents specify what they actually mean by ‘art’, even though it seems natural that their conclusions should vary depending on how the concept is understood. This paper offers a ‘definitional crossword’ and confronts some definitions of pornography with the currently most well-established definitions of art. My discussion shows that following any of the modern definitions entails that at least some pornography not only can be, but (...)
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  50. Jochen Briesen (2014). Pictorial Art and Epistemic Aims. In Harald Klinke (ed.), Art Theory as Visual Epistemology. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 11-28.score: 45.0
    The question whether art is of any epistemic value is an old question in the philosophy of art. Whereas many contemporary artists, art-critics, and art-historians answer this question affirmatively, many contemporary philosophers remain skeptical. If art is of epistemic significance, they maintain, then it has to contribute to our quest of achieving our most basic epistemic aim, namely knowledge.Unfortunately, recent and widely accepted analyses of knowledge make it very hard to see how art might significantly contribute to the quest of (...)
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