Search results for 'Art appreciation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber (2013). The Artful Mind Meets Art History: Toward a Psycho-Historical Framework for the Science of Art Appreciation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):123-180.score: 240.0
    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws (...)
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  2. Tone Roald (2008). Toward a Phenomenological Psychology of Art Appreciation. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 39 (2):189-212.score: 210.0
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  3. Matthew Kieran (2010). The Vice of Snobbery: Aesthetic Knowledge, Justification and Virtue in Art Appreciation. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):243-263.score: 180.0
    Apparently snobbery undermines justification for and legitimacy of aesthetic claims. It is also pervasive in the aesthetic realm, much more so than we tend to presume. If these two claims are combined, a fundamental problem arises: we do not know whether or not we are justified in believing or making aesthetic claims. Addressing this new challenge requires an epistemological story which underpins when, where and why snobbish judgement is problematic, and how appreciative claims can survive. This leads towards a virtue-theoretic (...)
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  4. Glenn Parsons & Allen Carlson (2013). Distinguishing Intention and Function in Art Appreciation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):153 - 154.score: 180.0
    We applaud Bullot & Reber's (B&R's) attempt to encompass the function of artworks within their psycho-historical model of art appreciation. However, we suggest that in order to fully realize this aim, they require a clearer distinction between an artist's intentions toward an artwork and its proper functions. We also show how such a distinction improves the internal coherence of their model.
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  5. Shigeko Takahashi & Yoshimichi Ejima (2013). Contextual Information Processing of Brain in Art Appreciation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):158-159.score: 180.0
    A psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation will be an experimental discipline that may shed new light on the highest capacities of the human brain, yielding new scientific ways to talk about the art appreciation. The recent findings of the contextual information processing in the human brain make the concept of the art-historical context clear for empirical experimentation.
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  6. William Forde Thompson & Mark Antliff (2013). Bridging Two Worlds That Care About Art: Psychological and Historical Approaches to Art Appreciation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):159-160.score: 180.0
    Art appreciation often involves contemplation beyond immediate perceptual experience. However, there are challenges to incorporating such processes into a comprehensive theory of art appreciation. Can appreciation be captured in the responses to individual artworks? Can all forms of contemplation be defined? What properties of artworks trigger contemplation? We argue that such questions are fundamental to a psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation, and we suggest research that may assist in refining this framework.
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  7. Patrick Carpenter (1971). Art and Ideas: An Approach to Art Appreciation. London,Mills and Boon.score: 162.0
     
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  8. V. Dura-Vila (2014). Courage in Art Appreciation: A Humean Perspective. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (1):77-95.score: 156.0
    In this article I argue that a high capacity for courage, in the sense of the strength of character that enables one to face distress, angst or psychological pain, is required of Hume’s ideal critics just as the other well-known five characteristics are. I also explore the implications of my proposal for several aspects of Hume’s aesthetics, including the one brought into relief by Shelley’s interpretation of Hume along the lines of distinguishing between the perceptual and affective stages in aesthetic (...)
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  9. Patrick Colm Hogan (2013). Art Appreciation and Aesthetic Feeling as Objects of Explanation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):147-148.score: 156.0
    The target article presents a thought-provoking approach to the relation of neuroscience and art. However, at least two issues pose potential difficulties. The first concerns whether is a coherent topic for scientific study. The second concerns the degree to which processing fluency can explain aesthetic feeling or may simply be one component of a more complex account.
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  10. Victor Yelverton Haines (2000). Appreciating Art Appreciation. Journal of Value Inquiry 34 (4):529-543.score: 150.0
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  11. Kazuhiro Ishizaki & Wenchun Wang (2003). Postmodern Approach to Art Appreciation for Integrated Study in Japan. Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (4):64-73.score: 150.0
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  12. Helmut Leder, Gernot Gerger, David Brieber & Norbert Schwarz (forthcoming). What Makes an Art Expert? Emotion and Evaluation in Art Appreciation. Cognition and Emotion:1-11.score: 150.0
  13. Preben Mortensen (forthcoming). Shaftesbury and the Morality of Art Appreciation. Journal of the History of Ideas.score: 150.0
  14. Warren Farnworth (1968). Art Appreciation in School. British Journal of Aesthetics 8 (4):402-406.score: 150.0
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  15. Helmut Leder (2007). Chapter Five When the Real van Gogh is Real! Cognitive Top-Down Effects in Art Appreciation Helmut Leder and M. Dorothee Augustin. In L. I͡A Dorfman, Colin Martindale & Vladimir Petrov (eds.), Aesthetics and Innovation. Cambridge Scholars Pub.. 67.score: 150.0
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  16. Allen Carlson (2000). Aesthetics and the Environment: The Appreciation of Nature, Art, and Architecture. Routledge.score: 144.0
    Aesthetics and the Environment presents fresh and fascinating insights into our interpretation of the environment. Traditional aesthetics is often associated with the appreciation of art, but Allen Carlson shows how much of our aesthetic experience does not encompass art but nature--in our response to sunsets, mountains or horizons or more mundane surroundings, like gardens or the view from our window. Carlson argues that knowledge of what it is we are appreciating is essential to having an appropriate aesthetic experience and (...)
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  17. Heidi Maibom & James Harold (2010). Without Taste: Psychopaths and the Appreciation of Art. la Nouvelle Revue Française d'Esthétique 6:151-63.score: 144.0
    Psychopaths are the bugbears of moral philosophy. They are often used as examples of perfectly rational people who are nonetheless willing to do great moral wrong without regret; hence the disorder has received the epithet “moral insanity” (Pritchard 1835). But whereas philosophers have had a great deal to say about psychopaths’ glaring and often horrifying lack of moral conscience, their aesthetic capacities have received hardly any attention, and are generally assumed to be intact or even enhanced. Popular culture often portrays (...)
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  18. Paul Ziff & Dale Jamieson (eds.) (1994). Language, Mind, and Art: Essays in Appreciation and Analysis in Honor of Paul Ziff. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 144.0
    This volume is a collection of essays in appreciation, analysis and honor of Paul Ziff, one of the leading American philosophers of the post-World War II period. The essays address questions that loomed large in Ziff's own work. Essays by Zeno Vendler, Jay Rosenberg, and Tom Patton address topics in philosophy of language: understanding, misunderstanding, rules, regularities, and proper names. Michael Resnik examines the nature of numbers, Rita Nolan addresses `mutant predicates', and Peter Alexander discusses microscopes and corpuscles. Douglas (...)
     
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  19. Alfred Neumeyer (1952). Aesthetic Attitudes and the Present Status of Art History and Appreciation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 11 (1):61-66.score: 126.0
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  20. John Andrew Fisher & Jason Potter (1997). Technology, Appreciation, and the Historical View of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (2):169-185.score: 126.0
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  21. Matthew Kieran (2009). Artistic Character, Creativity, and the Appreciation of Conceptual Art. In Peter Goldie & Elisabeth Schellekens (eds.), Philosophy and Conceptual Art. Oup Oxford.score: 126.0
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  22. Timothy W. Bartel (1979). Appreciation and Dickie's Definition of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 19 (1):44-52.score: 120.0
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  23. Patricia M. Matthews (2001). Aesthetic Appreciation of Art and Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (4):395-410.score: 120.0
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  24. John Elsner (1996). Image and Ritual: Reflections on the Religious Appreciation of Classical Art. Classical Quarterly 46 (02):515-.score: 120.0
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  25. Andy Hamilton (2001). Aesthetics and the Environmen: The Appreciation of Nature, Art and Architecture. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (4):444-446.score: 120.0
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  26. N. Horwitz & M. Trucco (2007). Appreciation of Art in a Workers' Hospital in Chile. Medical Humanities 33 (1):55-58.score: 120.0
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  27. David B. Richardson (1976). Nature-Appreciation Conventions and the Art World. British Journal of Aesthetics 16 (2):186-191.score: 120.0
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  28. Vincent Tomas (1952). Ducasse on Art and its Appreciation. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 13 (1):69-83.score: 120.0
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  29. Elmer I. Nocheseda (2013). Palaspas: An Appreciation of Palm Leaf Art in the Philippines. Philosophy East and West 63 (2).score: 120.0
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  30. Np Stallknecht (1975). Kant Concept of the Esthetic Idea and the Appreciation of Modern-Art. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 29 (111):175-186.score: 120.0
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  31. Dorothy Walsh & Harold Osborne (1971). The Art of Appreciation. Philosophical Quarterly 21 (84):283.score: 120.0
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  32. Barbara Bolt (2004). Art Beyond Representation: The Performative Power of the Image. I.B. Tauris.score: 96.0
    Refuting the assumption that art is a representational practice, Bolt's striking argument engages with the work of Heidegger, Deleuze and Guattari, C.S.Peirce and Judith Butler to argue for a performative relationship between art and artist. Drawing on themes as diverse as the work of Cezanne and of Francis Bacon, the transubstantiation of the Catholic sacrament and Wilde's novel The Picture of Dorian Gray , she challenges the metaphor of light as enlightenment, reconceiving this revealing light as the blinding glare of (...)
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  33. John Armstrong (2000). The Intimate Philosophy of Art. Allen Lane.score: 90.0
     
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  34. Vishwanath S. Naravane (2000). Creative Stillness: Indian Perspectives on Art & Beauty. Distributors, Lokbharti.score: 90.0
     
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  35. Thomas Leddy (2005). A Defense of Arts-Based Appreciation of Nature. Environmental Ethics 27 (3):299-315.score: 84.0
    In a pluralist and pragmatist view of aesthetic appreciation of nature, nature is validly appreciated through various cultural media including science, technology, mythology, and, in particular, the arts. Those who attack arts-based appreciation mainly think about the arts of the nineteenth century: traditional landscape painting and sculptures on pedestals. When we turn to art since the 1970s, for example, earth art, this picture changes. Allen Carlson’s attack on postmodernist and pluralist models of aesthetic appreciation does not pose (...)
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  36. Johan de Smedt & Helen de Cruz (2011). A Cognitive Approach to the Earliest Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):379-389.score: 72.0
    This paper takes a cognitive perspective to assess the significance of some Late Palaeolithic artefacts (sculptures and engraved objects) for philosophicalconcepts of art. We examine cognitive capacities that are necessary to produceand recognize objects that are denoted as art. These include the ability toattribute and infer design (design stance), the ability to distinguish between themateriality of an object and its meaning (symbol-mindedness), and an aesthetic sensitivity to some perceptual stimuli. We investigate to what extent thesecognitive processes played a role in (...)
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  37. Mohan Matthen (2011). Art, Sexual Selection, Group Selection (Critical Notice of Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct). Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):337-356.score: 66.0
    The capacity to engage with art is a human universal present in all cultures and just about every individual human. This indicates that this capacity is evolved. In this Critical Notice of Denis Dutton's The Art Instinct, I discuss various evolutionary scenarios and their consequences. Dutton and I both reject the "spandrel" approach that originates from the work of Gould and Lewontin. Dutton proposes, following work of Geoffrey Miller, that art is sexually selected--that art-production is a sign of a fit (...)
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  38. Noël Carroll (1999). Philosophy of Art: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.score: 66.0
    Philosophy of Art is a textbook for undergraduate students interested in the topic of philosophical aesthetics. It aims to introduce the techniques of analytic philosophy in addition to a selection of the major topics in this field of inquiry. These include the representational theory of art, formalism, neo-formalism, aesthetic theories of art, neo-Wittgensteinism, the Institutional Theory of Art, as well as historical approaches to the nature of art. Throughout the book, abstract philosophical theories are illustrated by examples of both traditional (...)
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  39. Paisley Livingston (2005). Art and Intention: A Philosophical Study. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    In Art and intention Paisley Livingston develops a broad and balanced perspective on perennial disputes between intentionalists and anti-intentionalists in philosophical aesthetics and critical theory. He surveys and assesses a wide range of rival assumptions about the nature of intentions and the status of intentionalist psychology. With detailed reference to examples from diverse media, art forms, and traditions, he demonstrates that insights into the multiple functions of intentions have important implications for our understanding of artistic creation and authorship, the ontology (...)
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  40. Lars Aagaard-Mogensen (ed.) (1976). Culture and Art: An Anthology. Humanities Press.score: 66.0
    Danto, A. The artworld.--Dickie, G. What is art?--Margolis, J. Works of art are physically embodied and culturally emergent entities.--Kjørup, S. Art broadly and wholly conceived.--Meyer, L. B. Forgery and the anthropology of art.--Brunius, T. Theory and ideologies in aesthetics.--Tilghman, B. R. Artistic puzzlement.--Binkley, T. Deciding about art.--Alexander, H. G. On defining in aesthetics.--Iseminger, G. Appreciation, the artworld, and the aesthetic.--Glickman, J. Creativity in the arts.--Sclafani, R. The theory of art.--Lyas, C. Danto and Dickie on art.--Beardsley, M. C. Is art (...)
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  41. Noel Carroll (2012). History and the Philosophy of Art. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):370-382.score: 66.0
    Abstract In this essay I trace the role of history in the philosophy of art from the early twentieth century to the present, beginning with the rejection of history by formalists like Clive Bell. I then attempt to show how the arguments of people like Morris Weitz and Arthur Danto led to a re-appreciation of history by philosophers of art such as Richard Wollheim, Jerrold Levinson, Robert Stecker and others.
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  42. Simon Fokt (2013). Solving Wollheim's Dilemma: A Fix for the Institutional Definition of Art. Metaphilosophy 44 (5):640-654.score: 66.0
    Richard Wollheim threatened George Dickie's institutional definition of art with a dilemma which entailed that the theory is either redundant or incomprehensible and useless. This article modifies the definition to avoid such criticism. First, it shows that the definition's concept of the artworld is not vague when understood as a conventional system of beliefs and practices. Then, based on Gaut's cluster theory, it provides an account of reasons artworld members have to confer the status of a candidate for appreciation. (...)
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  43. Andrea Lavazza (2009). Art as a Metaphor of the Mind. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):159-182.score: 66.0
    This paper focuses on the emergent neo-Jamesian perspective concerning the phenomenology of art and aesthetic experience. Starting from the distinction between nucleus and fringe in the stream of thought described by William James, it can be argued that our appreciation of a work of art is guided by a vague and blurred perception of a much more powerful content, of which we are not fully aware. Accordingly, a work of art is seen as a kind of metaphor of our (...)
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  44. Aaron Smuts (2012). Popular Art. In The Continuum Companion to Aesthetics. Continuum.score: 66.0
    The common assumption is that works of popular are less serious, less artistically valuable. Popular art is driven by a profit motive; real art, high art, is produced for loftier goals, such as aesthetic appreciation. Further, popular art is formulaic and gravitates toward the lowest common denominator. High art is innovative. It enriches, elevates, and inspires; popular art just entertains. Worse, popular art inculcates cultural biases. It is a corporate tool of ideological indoctrination, making contingent social and economic arrangements (...)
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  45. Paul Crowther (2002). The Transhistorical Image: Philosophizing Art and its History. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    Why are visual artworks experienced as having intrinsic significance or normative depth? Why are some works of art better able to manifest this significance than others? In his latest book Paul Crowther argues that we can answer these questions only if we have a full analytic definition of visual art. Crowther's approach focuses on the pictorial image, broadly construed to include abstract work and recent conceptually-based idioms. The significance of art depends, however, essentially on the transhistorical nature of the pictorial (...)
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  46. Stephen Davies (2007/2010). Philosophical Perspectives on Art. New York;Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Philosophical Perspectives on Art presents a series of essays devoted to two of the most fundamental topics in the philosophy of art: the distinctive character of artworks and what is involved in understanding them as art. In Part I, Stephen Davies considers a wide range of questions about the nature and definition of art. Can art be defined, and if so, which definitions are the most plausible? Do we make and consume art because there are evolutionary advantages to doing so? (...)
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  47. Hans Maes & Jerrold Levinson (eds.) (2012). Art & Pornography: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Art and Pornography presents a series of essays which investigate the artistic status and aesthetic dimension of pornographic pictures, films, and literature, and explores the distinction, if there is any, between pornography and erotic art. Is there any overlap between art and pornography, or are the two mutually exclusive? If they are, why is that? If they are not, how might we characterize pornographic art or artistic pornography, and how might pornographic art be distinguished, if at all, from erotic art? (...)
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  48. Machiel Keestra (2014). Mirrors of the Soul and Mirrors of the Brain? The Expression of Emotions as the Subject of Art and Science. In Gary Schwartz (ed.), Emotions. Pain and pleasure in Dutch painting of the Golden Age. nai010 publishers. 81-92.score: 66.0
    Is it not surprising that we look with so much pleasure and emotion at works of art that were made thousands of years ago? Works depicting people we do not know, people whose backgrounds are usually a mystery to us, who lived in a very different society and time and who, moreover, have been ‘frozen’ by the artist in a very deliberate pose. It was the Classical Greek philosopher Aristotle who observed in his Poetics that people could apparently be moved (...)
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  49. Paul Carter (2004). Material Thinking: The Theory and Practice of Creative Research. Melbourne University Publishing.score: 66.0
    This intimate account of how ideas get turned into artwork—including dance performance, film, sound installation, sculpture, and painting—looks at how the material thinking that art embodies produces new understandings about individuals, their histories, and the cultures they inhabit. Discussing the philosophy of signs (images, text, and their interaction), the psychology of visual perception, and the overarching notion of mythopoeic place-making, this intellectually wide-ranging and anecdotally narrated primer provides a fresh perspective to the concept of inventing. All active practitioners in the (...)
     
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  50. James Grant (2013). The Critical Imagination. Oxford University Press.score: 64.0
    The Critical Imagination is a study of metaphor, imaginativeness, and criticism of the arts. Since the eighteenth century, many philosophers have argued that appreciating art is rewarding because it involves responding imaginatively to a work. Literary works can be interpreted in many ways; architecture can be seen as stately, meditative, or forbidding; and sensitive descriptions of art are often colourful metaphors: music can 'shimmer', prose can be 'perfumed', and a painter's colouring can be 'effervescent'. Engaging with art, like creating it, (...)
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