Search results for 'Art, Asian' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Pratapaditya Pal, Stephen Little & Art Institute of Chicago (1997). A Collecting Odyssey Indian, Himalayan, and Southeast Asian Art From the James and Marilynn Alsdorf Collection. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  2
    Teo Hwee Leng Phyllis (2010). Chinese and Other Asian Modernisms: A Comparative View of Art-Historical Contexts in the Twentieth Century. Asian Culture and History 2 (2):P3.
    Modernism is often implicitly known and understood from the “Western modernist” perspective and history. The wide recognition of the Western modernist canon as centre and universal displaces the contribution and significance of the non-Western world in the modern movement. Within Asia, the modernisms that arose from various nations in the region had subtly different notions of culture, identity, nationhood, and modernity, although almost every Asian country was related in one way or another to the history of Western imperialism. Using (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  25
    Barry Allen (2013). Games of Sport, Works of Art, and the Striking Beauty of Asian Martial Arts. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (2):241 - 254.
    Martial-arts practice is not quite anything else: it is like sport, but is not sport; it constantly refers to and as it were cohabits with violence, but is not violent; it is dance-like but not dance. It shares a common athleticism with sports and dance, yet stands apart from both, especially through its paradoxical commitment to the external value of being an instrument of violence. My discussion seeks to illuminate martial arts practice by systematic contrast to games of sport and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4. Rupert Richard Arrowsmith (2010). Modernism and the Museum: Asian, African, and Pacific Art and the London Avant-Garde. OUP Oxford.
    By demonstrating that many of the concepts and styles associated with Modernism were actually derived directly from cultures such as Japan, China, Korea, India, Egypt, Assyria, West Africa, and the Pacific Islands, this book provides an entirely new way of looking at the evolution of Modernist art and literature in the West.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Phyllis Teo (2010). Chinese and Other Asian Modernisms: A Comparative View of Art-Historical Contexts in the Twentieth Century. Asian Culture and History 2 (2).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  16
    Mary Ann Maslak (2006). The Aesthetics of Asian Art: The Study of Montien Boonma in the Undergraduate Education Classroom. Journal of Aesthetic Education 40 (2):67-82.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  7
    Thomas L. Kennedy Philadelphia, Cross-Cultural Perspectives By K. Ramakrishna, Constituting Communities, Theravada Buddhism, Jacob N. Kinnard Holt & Jonathan S. Walters Albany (2004). The Ambitions of Curiosity: Understanding the World in Ancient Greece and China. By GER Lloyd. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Pp. Xvi+ 175. Price Not Given. The Art of the Han Essay: Wang Fu's Ch'ien-Fu Lun. By Anne Behnke Kinney. Tempe: Center for Asian Studies, Arizona State University, 1990. Pp. Xi+ 154. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 54 (1):110-112.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  5
    Morris F. Low (1993). The History of East Asian Science: State of the Art. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (4):677-686.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Mara Miller (2012). East Asian Aesthetics. In Sheng Kuan Chung (ed.), Teaching Asian art: Content, Context, and Pedagogy. The National Art Education Association
    Aesthetics and arts are strongly linked across East Asia (China, Japan and Korea) and (through pottery and gardens) throughout Southeast Asia as well. This paper outlines eight aesthetic issues pertaining across arts in East Asia, appropriate for K-12: 1) the intimate interrelations among arts (gardens, painting, poetry, calligraphy, music, tea ceremony); 2) nature and the seasons (architecture, poetry, gardens, food); 4) collaboration (poetry, gardens, festivals, and tea ceremony); 5) self-cultivation; 6) symbolism versus allusion; 7) the importance of active imagination in (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy (1977). On the Traditional Doctrine of Art. Golgonooza Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Graham Hutt, Rosemary E. Scott, William Watson & Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art (1987). Style in the East Asian Tradition.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Michael Adam (1976). Wandering in Eden: Three Ways to the East Within Us. Distributed by Random House.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  7
    Hyun Woosik (2016). An East Asian Mathematical Conceptualization of the Transhuman. Zygon 51 (1):161-175.
    This study explores the transhuman from an East Asian perspective. In terms of cognitive science, mathematics, and theology, we define the transhuman system as characterized by transcendence, extension by compactification, and samtaegeuk. Compactification is conceptualized here in mathematical terms, as adding one or more elements so that a system becomes more complete—as one might join both ends of a line, and thereby create a circle. We assert that the East Asian transhuman could be defined as a three-point compactification: (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  4
    Michel Puech (forthcoming). A Non-Confrontational Art of Living in the Technosphere and Infosphere. Foundations of Science:1-6.
    Several trends in contemporary philosophy have revived the question of the good life. This article addresses the more elaborate notion of an “art of living” in the specific context of the technosphere on the basis of recent works in philosophy of technology. It also brings ideas from Asian philosophy and from Buddhism in particular into the discussion. The focus is on the notion of non-confrontation, which could lead to a decisive change in the methods and scope of technology assessment (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  87
    Arthur Versluis (1993). American Transcendentalism and Asian Religions. Oxford University Press.
    The first major study since the 1930s of the relationship between American Transcendentalism and Asian religions, and the first comprehensive work to include post-Civil War Transcendentalists like Samuel Johnson, this book is encyclopedic in scope. Beginning with the inception of Transcendentalist Orientalism in Europe, Versluis covers the entire history of American Transcendentalism into the twentieth century, and the profound influence of Orientalism on the movement--including its analogues and influences in world religious dialogue. He examines what he calls "positive Orientalism," (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16.  47
    Véronique M. Fóti (1998). Heidegger and 'the Way of Art:' The Empty Origin and Contemporary Abstraction. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 31 (4):337-351.
    With a focus on the question of visuality in Heidegger's sustained involvement with Daoist and Zen thought, this paper discusses the interchange between Heidegger and Hisamatsu at a 1958 colloquium. In light of the key concerns – visuality, art, and the empty origin of manifestation – it interrogates three texts,The Origin of the Work of Art,Parmenides, andArt and Space,concerning visuality, the play of the glance, writing, space and place, and the Graeco-Asian though of phainesthai. In conclusion, it addresses (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  5
    Eva Maria Raepple, Divan Japonais: Toulouse-Lautrec and Japanese Art.
    The French nineteenth century artists Henry Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901) is known for his distinctive style and bold character portraits of the theatrical scene of the gaslight era in Paris. The paper examines some of the formative influences of eighteenth century Japanese art on the development of visual characters, with specific focus on a lithograph entitled Divan Japonais. Alluding to the refined representation of Japanese courtesans, subtle nuanced reminiscences to an ideal of elegance create an allusion to highly respected courtesans in the (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Barry Allen (2015). Striking Beauty: A Philosophical Look at the Asian Martial Arts. Cup.
    The first book to focus on the intersection of Western philosophy and the Asian martial arts, _Striking Beauty_ comparatively studies the historical and philosophical traditions of martial arts practice and their ethical value in the modern world. Expanding Western philosophy's global outlook, the book forces a theoretical reckoning with the concerns of Chinese philosophy and the aesthetic and technical dimensions of martial arts practice. _Striking Beauty_ explains the relationship between Asian martial arts and the Chinese philosophical traditions of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  12
    James T. Bretzke (2001). Bibliography on East Asian Religion and Philosophy. E. Mellen Press.
    Machine generated contents note: INTRODUCTION 1 -- Focus of the Sections and Sub-sections 1 -- East Asian Internet Resources 1 -- A Note on Using the Index 2 -- GENERAL WORKS ON PHILOSOPHY& RELIGION IN ASIA 5 -- BUDDHISM 37 -- Primary Sources 37 -- Buddhist Ethics 38 -- Buddhism and Judeo-Christianity 52 -- Zen Buddhism 69 -- Other Works on Buddhism 76 -- CONFUCIANISM 95 -- Chinese and Confucian Classics 95 -- Translations of the Four Books 95 -- (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Nathalie Heinich, Esthe Lin & Johanna Liu (2006). Between Ethics and Aesthetics: Art and Animality. Philosophy and Culture 33 (10):51-67.
    In this paper, the future of bullfighting in France not long to break the moral value and aesthetic experience in disputes arising from conduct analysis to facilitate thinking about aesthetic experience and the relationship between animal existence. This paper is seeking to explore, and not in the evaluation of an article or opinion on a work conflict, but conflict involved to judge the value of multiple values. Guardian of moral values ​​and oppose bullfighting events, the main slogan is to respect (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Mara Miller (forthcoming). East Asian Aesthetics. Teaching Asian Art.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  14
    Richard Shusterman (2004). Pragmatism and East-Asian Thought. Metaphilosophy 35 (1-2):13-43.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  23.  92
    Robert Elliott Allinson (2007). Wittgenstein, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu: The Art of Circumlocution. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):97 – 108.
    Where Western philosophy ends, with the limits of language, marks the beginning of Eastern philosophy. The Tao de jing of Laozi begins with the limitations of language and then proceeds from that as a starting point. On the other hand, the limitation of language marks the end of Wittgenstein's cogitations. In contrast to Wittgenstein, who thought that one should remain silent about that which cannot be put into words, the message of the Zhuangzi is that one can speak about that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  2
    Crispin Sartwell (1993). Art and War: Paradox of the Bhagavad Git. Asian Philosophy 3 (2):95 – 102.
    Abstract The first several chapters of the Bhagavad Git? set themselves a daunting task: to explain how a life of action can be rendered compatible with a life of renunciation of desire. The situation, in fact, is designed to raise the issue in an excruciatingly intense form. As Krsna and Arjuna pause on the verge of the great battle, Arjuna asks how killing people?including his own teachers and members of his own family?in order to secure power and fame, can be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  18
    Sor-Hoon Tan (1999). Experience as Art. Asian Philosophy 9 (2):107 – 122.
    Chinese philosophy views experience as intrinsically aesthetic. This world view could be elucidated through a consideration of John Dewey's aesthetics and features of Chinese art. Dewey's philosophy of art starts with an understanding of experience as 'live processes' of living creatures interacting with their environment. Such processes are autopoietic in being self-sustaining, ever-changing, capable of increasing complexity, capable of generating novelty, direction and progress on its own. Its autopoietic character is a precondition of the aesthetic in the process of experience. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  11
    Huaiyu Wang (2011). Piety and Individuality Through a Convoluted Path of Rightness: Exploring the Confucian Art of Moral Discretion Via Analects 13.18. Asian Philosophy 21 (4):395 - 418.
    This essay presents an in-depth interpretation of the controversial dialogue in Analects 13.18 through careful and critical investigation of its historical background and philosophical significations. With a clarification of the multifaceted connotations of the word zhi (?, upright, forthright), my study brings out the play of irony in Confucius's words in Analects 13.18. According to my interpretation, not only is Confucius's reaction not inappropriate but it also demonstrates the art of early Confucian moral discretion that was informed by the teaching (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  2
    Yanjun Li & Xiaosheng Sun (2012). Study on Carving Art of DangShi Manor in Suide County, Shaanxi, China. Asian Culture and History 4 (1):p48.
    The DangShi manor is located in Hejiashi Village, Baijiajian Town approximately 20 kilometers from the southeast part of Suide County, Shaanxi Province, the unique architecture in Qing Dynasty that has been preserved almost intact in Suide County, a great cultural county, and is an officially protected site in Shaanxi Province. By means of field survey, mapping and taking photos and recording in Dangshi manor, this article acquires the abundant first-hand data about carving art of the manor. With the methods of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Aryan Amirkhani, Hanie Okhovat & Ehsan Zamani (2010). Ancient Pigeon Houses: Remarkable Example of the Asian Culture Crystallized in the Architecture of Iran and Central Anatolia. Asian Culture and History 2 (2):P45.
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Architectural heritage is considered a fundamental issue in the life of modern societies. In addition to their historical interest, cultural heritage buildings are valuable because they contribute significantly to the economy by providing key attractions at a time when tourism and leisure are major industries. The need for preserving historical constructions is thus not only a cultural requirement, but also an economical and developmental demand. Herein, among different Iranian heritage buildings, pigeon towers, or dovecotes, are of a great importance. Hundreds of dovecotes, dating largely to the Safavid period, dot the fields in the vicinity of Isfahan. On the other hand, valleys formed by creeks in central parts of Anatolia seem to have offered suitable environments for ancient settlements. Cappadocia region and two valleys nearby the town of Gesi accommodate a number of villages surrounded by hundreds of dove cotes in different types. This paper investigates different types of dovecotes in Iran plateau and Central Anatolia, Turkey. The results show there is a fundamental difference between the structures of dovecotes in these two countries. However, ancient dovecotes in Iran and Central Anatolia can be considered good examples of 'architecture without architects' or ' spectacular vernacular architecture'. Master builders who designed and constructed these buildings for such a simple function, created impressive forms without much pretension and bringing forth the tectonic aspects of the art of architecture. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Keywords: Dovecotes, architecture, Iran, Isfahan, Central Anatolia. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  20
    Richard Shusterman (2007). Asian Ars Erotica and the Question of Sexual Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (1):55–68.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  30.  20
    Barry Allen (2014). Daoism and Chinese Martial Arts. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):251-266.
    The now-global phenomenon of Asian martial arts traces back to something that began in China. The idea the Chinese communicated was the dual cultivation of the spiritual and the martial, each perfected in the other, with the proof of perfection being an effortless mastery of violence. I look at one phase of the interaction between Asian martial arts and Chinese thought, with a reading of the Zhuangzi 莊子 and the Daodejing 道德經 from a martial arts perspective. I do (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  38
    Chengji Liu (2008). The Body and its Image in Classical Chinese Aesthetics. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):577-594.
    Richard Shusterman’s Pragmatist Aesthetics : Living Beauty, Rethinking Art was published in China in 2002. In the preface of the Chinese edition, the author claimed that his tentative idea of soma esthetics was encouraged by Chinese philosophy and other ancient Asian philosophy. Shusterman’s background in pragmatist philosophy greatly constrains his understanding of the body in classical Chinese aesthetics in that he only pays attention to the technical aspects of physical training while neglecting the philosophical basis of this training. In (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  22
    James M. Shields (2011). The Art of Aidagara : Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Quest for an Ontology of Social Existence in Watsuji Tetsurō's Rinrigaku. Asian Philosophy 19 (3):265-283.
    This paper provides an analysis of the key term aidagara ('betweenness') in the philosophical ethics of Watsuji Tetsurō (1889-1960), in response to and in light of the recent movement in Japanese Buddhist studies known as 'Critical Buddhism'. The Critical Buddhist call for a turn away from 'topical' or intuitionist thinking and towards (properly Buddhist) 'critical' thinking, while problematic in its bipolarity, raises the important issue of the place of 'reason' vs 'intuition' in Japanese Buddhist ethics. In this paper, a comparison (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  20
    Ian Holliday (2003). Traditional Medicines in Modern Societies: An Exploration of Integrationist Options Through East Asian Experience. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (3):373 – 389.
    Modern scientific medicine is increasingly challenged by complementary and alternative therapies. Reviewing policy options for contemporary healthcare development, the World Health Organization's first global strategy on traditional and alternative medicine, released in May 2002, advocates integration. However, experience in East Asia, the only part of the world where state of the art modern scientific facilities are commonly found alongside thriving traditional practices, reveals that medical integration can take several forms. To clarify the available policy options, this article categorizes those forms, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  2
    Jane Zheng (2013). Art and the Shift in Garden Culture in the Jiangnan Area in China (16th-17th Century). Asian Culture and History 5 (2):p1.
    The remarkable growth in interest in aesthetic gardens in the late Ming period has been recognized in Chinese garden culture studies. The materialist historical approach contributes to revealing the importance of gardens’ economic functions in the shift of garden culture, but is inadequate in explaining the successive burgeoning of small plain gardens in the 17th century. This article integrates the aesthetic and materialist perspectives and situates the cultural transition in the concrete social and cultural context in the late Ming period. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  1
    Surat Jongda, Surapone Virulrak & Vuthipong Roadkasamsri (2014). The Art of Khon Lakhon Costumes. Asian Culture and History 7 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  2
    Ursula King (2002). Jacob N. Kinnard: Imagining Wisdom. Seeing and Knowing in the Art of Indian Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 12 (1):65 – 66.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  11
    Michael C. Brannigan (2009). Striking a Balance: A Primer in Traditional Asian Values. Lexington Books.
    Introduction -- Hindu ethics -- Life's four goals -- Paths to Enlightenment -- Karma and rebirth -- Shades of Dharma -- Buddhist ethics -- The middle path -- The four noble truths -- In the wake of karma -- The four supreme virtues -- What is a Buddhist social ethics? -- Zen Buddhist ethics -- A way of the monk : practice is attainment -- A way of the warrior -- A way of tea : the virtue of presence -- (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Jacqueline Chin, Voo Teck Chuan, Nicola Peart & Roy Joseph (2008). Of Learning Curves, Chess and the Art of Translation in Medical Ethics. Asian Bioethics Review 1 (1):74-80.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Kenneth M. George (2007). Art and Identity Politics: Nation, Religion, Ethnicity, Elsewhere Kenneth M. George. In Kathryn May Robinson (ed.), Asian and Pacific Cosmopolitans: Self and Subject in Motion. Palgrave Macmillan 37.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Stephen J. Goldberg (2009). Philosophical Reflection and Visual Art in Traditional China. In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Harriette D. Grissom (2009). Art : Nama-Rupa: The Paradox of Embodiment in Indian Art. In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Caroline Turner (2007). Wounds in Our Heart: Identity and Social Justice in the Art of Dadang Christanto. In Kathryn May Robinson (ed.), Asian and Pacific Cosmopolitans: Self and Subject in Motion. Palgrave Macmillan 77.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. R. John Williams (2014). The Buddha in the Machine: Art, Technology, and the Meeting of East and West. Yale University Press.
    The famous 1893 Chicago World’s Fair celebrated the dawn of corporate capitalism and a new Machine Age with an exhibit of the world’s largest engine. Yet the noise was so great, visitors ran out of the Machinery Hall to retreat to the peace and quiet of the Japanese pavilion’s Buddhist temples and lotus ponds. Thus began over a century of the West’s turn toward an Asian aesthetic as an antidote to modern technology. From the turn-of-the-century Columbian Exhibition to the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Jane Zheng (2014). The Shanghai Art School: Relocating Chinese Art Teaching From The Private Studios To The Public Education System, 1913-1937. Asian Culture and History 7 (1).
  45.  21
    Denis Dutton (2009). The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, & Human Evolution. Bloomsbury Press.
    Introduction -- Landscape and longing -- Art and human nature -- What is art? -- But they don't have our concept of art -- Art and natural selection -- The uses of fiction -- Art and human self-domestication -- Intention, forgery, dada : three aesthetic problems -- The contingency of aesthetic values -- Greatness in the arts.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  46.  5
    Alexander Nehamas (2007). Only a Promise of Happiness: The Place of Beauty in a World of Art. Princeton University Press.
    Neither art nor philosophy was kind to beauty during the twentieth century. Much modern art disdains beauty, and many philosophers deeply suspect that beauty merely paints over or distracts us from horrors. Intellectuals consigned the passions of beauty to the margins, replacing them with the anemic and rarefied alternative, "aesthetic pleasure." In Only a Promise of Happiness , Alexander Nehamas reclaims beauty from its critics. He seeks to restore its place in art, to reestablish the connections among art, beauty, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  47. Johan de Smedt & Helen de Cruz (2011). A Cognitive Approach to the Earliest Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):379-389.
    This paper takes a cognitive perspective to assess the significance of some Late Palaeolithic artefacts (sculptures and engraved objects) for philosophicalconcepts of art. We examine cognitive capacities that are necessary to produceand recognize objects that are denoted as art. These include the ability toattribute and infer design (design stance), the ability to distinguish between themateriality of an object and its meaning (symbol-mindedness), and an aesthetic sensitivity to some perceptual stimuli. We investigate to what extent thesecognitive processes played a role in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48. Noël Carroll (2002). The Wheel of Virtue: Art, Literature, and Moral Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):3–26.
    In this essay, then, I would like to address what I believe are the most compelling epistemic arguments against the notion that literature (and art more broadly) can function as an instrument of education and a source of knowledge.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  49. Paisley Livingston (2005). Art and Intention: A Philosophical Study. Oxford University Press.
    In Art and intention Paisley Livingston develops a broad and balanced perspective on perennial disputes between intentionalists and anti-intentionalists in philosophical aesthetics and critical theory. He surveys and assesses a wide range of rival assumptions about the nature of intentions and the status of intentionalist psychology. With detailed reference to examples from diverse media, art forms, and traditions, he demonstrates that insights into the multiple functions of intentions have important implications for our understanding of artistic creation and authorship, the ontology (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  50.  32
    Mari Mikkola (2013). Pornography, Art and Porno-Art. In Hans Maes (ed.), Pornographic Art and the Aesthetics of Pornography. Palgrave Macmillan 27.
    Philosophers involved in the ‘porn-or-art’ debates standardly assume that pornography is centrally about sexual arousal, while art is about something else. I argue against this assumption and for the view that there is no single thing that pornography (or art) ‘is about’. This suggests that there is no prima facie reason for claiming that some x cannot be both pornography and art. I further go on to develop an understanding of (what I call) ‘porno-art’ - a wholly new kind of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000