Search results for 'Art, Modern' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jennifer Dyer Harnish (2011). Serial Images: The Modern Art of Iteration. Lit.score: 156.0
    Chapter One Introduction Serial Iteration in Modern Art This book is an analysis of the theoretical and historical relations between modern painting and seriality. While many modern artists have created and presented their works in the ...
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  2. Paul Crowther (2012). The Phenomenology of Modern Art: Exploding Deleuze, Illuminating Style. Continuum International Publishing Group.score: 156.0
    The first sustained phenomenological approach to modern art, taking a new approach and drawing upon an unsual selection of thinkers.
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  3. Patrick Maynard (1991). Review of J. Kirk Varnedoe, A Fine Disregard: What Makes Modern Art Modern. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (4):390-392.score: 144.0
     
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  4. Herbert Edward Read (1971). The Philosophy of Modern Art. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 132.0
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  5. Moshe Barasch (1990). Modern Theories of Art. New York University Press.score: 126.0
    In this volume, the third in his classic series of texts surveying the history of art theory, Moshe Barasch traces the hidden patterns and interlocking themes in the study of art, from Impressionism to Abstract Art. Barasch details the immense social changes in the creation, presentation, and reception of art which have set the history of art theory on a vertiginous new course: the decreased relevance of workshops and art schools; the replacement of the treatise by the critical review; and (...)
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  6. Robert Klein (1979). Form and Meaning: Essays on the Renaissance and Modern Art. Viking Press.score: 120.0
     
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  7. F. D. Klingender (1975). Marxism and Modern Art: An Approach to Social Realism. Lawrence and Wishart.score: 120.0
  8. Alexander Nagel & Lorenzo Pericolo (eds.) (2010). Subject as Aporia in Early Modern Art. Ashgate.score: 120.0
     
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  9. Lorenzo Pericolo (2010). Subject as Aporia in Early Modern Art. Ashgate.score: 120.0
     
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  10. James I. Porter (2009). Is Art Modern? Kristeller's ‘Modern System of the Arts’ Reconsidered. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (1):1-24.score: 102.0
    The Modern System of the Arts: A Study in the History of Aesthetics’ is a classic statement of the view, now widely adopted but rarely examined, that aesthetics became possible only in the eighteenth-century with the emergence of the fine arts. I wish to contest this view, for three reasons. Firstly, Kristeller's historical account can be questioned; alternative and equally plausible accounts are available. Secondly, ‘the modern system of the arts’ appears to have been neither a system nor (...)
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  11. Noël Carroll (2009). Les Culs-de-Sac of Enlightenment Aesthetics: A Metaphilosophy of Art. Metaphilosophy 40 (2):157-178.score: 102.0
    Abstract: This article charts the rise and fall of the Modern System of the Arts and the failure of the aesthetic theory of art to define membership in the so-called system, which, instead, I argue, is and has been, for a long time, merely a historically evolved collection. Rather than endorsing the continued attempt to define Art with a capital A in terms of aesthetic experience, I recommend alternative lines of research for contemporary philosophers of the arts.
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  12. Gregg Horowitz (2001). Sustaining Loss: Art and Mournful Life. Stanford University Press.score: 102.0
    Sustaining Loss explores the uncanny, traumatic weaving together of the living and the dead in art, and the morbid fascination it holds for modern philosophical aesthetics. Beginning with Kant, the author traces how aesthetic theory has been drawn back repeatedly to the moving power of the undead body of the work of art. He locates the most potent expressions of this philosophical compulsion in Hegel's thesis that art is a thing of the past, and in Freud's view that the (...)
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  13. James porter (2009). Is Art Modern? BJA 49 (1):1-24.score: 102.0
    Kristeller's article ‘The Modern System of the Arts: A Study in the History of Aesthetics’ is a classic statement of the view, now widely adopted but rarely examined, that aesthetics became possible only in the eighteenth-century with the emergence of the fine arts. I wish to contest this view, for three reasons. Firstly, Kristeller's historical account can be questioned; alternative and equally plausible accounts are available. Secondly, ‘the modern system of the arts’ appears to have been neither a (...)
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  14. Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.) (2007). Art: Key Contemporary Thinkers. Berg.score: 102.0
    The last few decades have witnessed an explosion in ideas and theories on art. Art itself has never been more popular, but much recent thinking remains inaccessible and difficult to use. This book assesses the work of leading thinkers (including artists) who are having a major impact on making, criticizing and interpreting art. Each entry, written by a leading international expert, presents a concise, critical appraisal of a thinker and their contribution to thought about art and its place in the (...)
     
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  15. Nicholas Alden Riggle (2010). Street Art: The Transfiguration of the Commonplaces. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):243-257.score: 96.0
    According to Arthur Danto, post-modern or post-historical art began when artists like Andy Warhol collapsed the Modern distinction between art and everyday life by bringing “the everyday” into the artworld. I begin by pointing out that there is another way to collapse this distinction: bring art out of the artworld and into everyday life. An especially effective way of doing this to make street art, which, I argue, is art whose meaning depends on its use of the street. (...)
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  16. Christine Magerski (2012). Arnold Gehlen Modern Art as Symbol of Modern Society. Thesis Eleven 111 (1):81-96.score: 96.0
    Arnold Gehlen is one of the most controversial figures of German intellectual history. Gehlen’s commitment to National Socialism (a commitment he never disavowed) is mostly seen in close connection with his theoretical focus on institutions. According to Gehlen, what mankind requires above all is order and thus the protection of institutions. And yet, by reducing Gehlen’s sociology to the necessity of order one misses the analytical scope of his writings. As this article aims to show, the strength of Gehlen’s sociology (...)
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  17. Michael Baur (1996). Adorno and Heidegger on Art in the Modern World. Philosophy Today 40 (3):357-366.score: 96.0
    First, this article considers some similarities between Adorno and Heidegger concerning the role of art in the modern world. Next, the article outlines some crucial differences; for example, Adorno regards all thought (including that which gives rise to art) as intrinsically dominative, while Heidegger holds that even dominative, objectifying thought presupposes a kind of thought that is not dominative or objectifying. An articulation of these differences helps to illuminate the ways in which the ideas of both Adorno and Heidegger (...)
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  18. Simon Fokt, Defining Art Culturally : Modern Theories of Art - a Synthesis.score: 96.0
    Numerous theories have attempted to overcome the anti-essentialist scepticism about the possibility of defining art. While significant advances have been made in this field, it seems that most modern definitions fail to successfully address the issue of the ever-changing nature of art raised by Morris Weitz, and rarely even attempt to provide an account which would be valid in more than just the modern Western context. This thesis looks at the most successful definitions currently defended, determines their strengths (...)
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  19. Karsten Harries (1979). Meaning of Modern Art. Northwestern University Press.score: 96.0
    Originally published in 1968, Karsten Harries's classic work provides a philosophical understanding of how modern art differs fundamentally from the art of earlier periods.
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  20. Richard Shiff (2013). Watch Out for Thinking (Even Fuzzy Thinking) Concept and Percept in Modern Art. Common Knowledge 19 (1):65-87.score: 96.0
    This article, a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur,” documents how some modern artists and critics have argued against any sort of verbal thinking about art. Beyond describing works of visual art and pronouncing on their relative quality, critics often assume responsibility for explaining what a given work means. Because paintings and sculptures are less precisely codified, less articulate, than verbalized communications, they may seem to require verbal translation. Yet some artists and (...)
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  21. Paul Mattick (2003). Art in its Time: Theories and Practices of Modern Aesthetics. Routledge.score: 96.0
    Art In Its Time takes a close look at the way in which art has become integral to the everyday 'ordinary' life of modern society. It explores the prevalent notion of art as transcending its historical moment, and argues that art cannot be separated from the everyday as it often provides material to represent social struggles and class, to explore sexuality, and to think about modern industry and our economic relationships.
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  22. Jason Miller (2012). Collision: The Death of Art and the Sunday of Life: Hegel on the Fate of Modern Art. Evental Aesthetics 1 (1):39-47.score: 96.0
    Focusing specifically on Hegels analysis of Dutch genre painting in the Lectures on Aesthetics, Jason Miller argues that Hegel regards modern art not as a failure to convey the deepest interests of a culture or society, but as a welcome liberation of art in which it comes to reflect the diversity and complexity of human experience.
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  23. Paul Mattick (ed.) (1993). Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics and the Reconstruction of Art. Cambridge University Press.score: 90.0
    This collection of essays explores the rise of aesthetics as a response to, and as a part of, the reshaping of the arts in modern society. The theories of art developed under the name of 'aesthetics' in the eighteenth century have traditionally been understood as contributions to a field of study in existence since the time of Plato. If art is a practice to be found in all human societies, then the philosophy of art is the search for universal (...)
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  24. Reinold Schmücker (2010). The Lord of the Flaws. The Autonomy of the Artist and the Function of Art. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 20 (38).score: 90.0
    In aesthetics a misleading idea of autonomy prevails: art is autonomous because it does not serve any heteronomous purposes. This conviction is deeply rooted in the philosophy of art from Romanticism to Heidegger and Adorno. However, it is not convincing because art is functional in various ways. It can have a variety of very different purposes – including some that the artist does not approve. Against this background, the article focuses on a peculiarity of modern aesthetics which has not (...)
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  25. Francisco Vicent Galdón (2012). El Museu d'Art Modern de Tarragona, un grato encuentro con el arte actual. Crítica 62 (981):93.score: 90.0
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  26. K. D. D. Henderson (1969). Religion and Contemporary Western Culture (Readings From Ayer, Brunner, Bultmann, Christopher Dawson, Freud, Fromm, the Niebuhr Brothers, Sartre, Tillich and Others. With a Bibliography for Each of Seven Sections, Covering Religion in the Context of Culture, Modern Art, Modern Literature, Philosophy, Psychotherapy, Science and Sociology.) Edited by Edward Cell. (Abingdon Press. Nashville, N.Y.) 399 Pp. 7 Plates. $7.95. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 4 (2):303.score: 90.0
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  27. David Kenneth Holt (2001). The Search for Aesthetic Meaning in the Visual Arts: The Need for the Aesthetic Tradition in Contemporary Art Theory and Education. Bergin & Garvey.score: 84.0
    Postmodern art theory is an anomaly in the history of art theory.
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  28. Francis Halsall, Julia Jansen & Tony O'Connor (eds.) (2009). Rediscovering Aesthetics: Transdisciplinary Voices From Art History, Philosophy, and Art Practice. Stanford University Press.score: 84.0
    Rediscovering Aesthetics brings together prominent international voices from art history, philosophy and artistic practice who reflect on current notions, ...
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  29. Ernst van Alphen (2005). Art in Mind: How Contemporary Images Shape Thought. University of Chicago Press.score: 84.0
    Art has the power to affect our thinking, changing not only the way we view and interact with the world but also how we create it. In Art in Mind , Ernst van Alphen probes this idea of art as a commanding force with the capacity to shape our intellect and intervene in our lives. Rather than interpreting art as merely a reflection of our social experience or a product of history, van Alphen here argues that art is a historical (...)
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  30. Agnes Ballestrem (1998). Modern Art, Who Cares? Techne 8:5-6.score: 84.0
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  31. Manfred Kienpointner (1997). On the Art of Finding Arguments: What Ancient and Modern Masters of Invention Have to Tell Us About the" Ars Inveniendi". Argumentation 11 (2):225-236.score: 84.0
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  32. Xavier Rubert de Ventós (1980). Heresies of Modern Art. Columbia University Press.score: 84.0
     
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  33. Marjorie Bowen (1939). Ethics in Modern Art. Watts.score: 84.0
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  34. Charlie Gere (2006). Art, Time, and Technology. Berg.score: 84.0
    This book explores how the practice of art, in particular of avant-garde art, keeps our relation to time, history and even our own humanity open. Examining key moments in the history of both technology and art from the beginnings of industrialisation to today, Charlie Gere explores both the making and purpose of art and how much further it can travel from the human body.
     
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  35. Lionel Gossman (2008). Beyond Modern the Art of the Nazarenes. Common Knowledge 14 (1):45-104.score: 84.0
    Until recently, the general judgment of the once admired and influential Nazarene painters of early-nineteenth-century Germany, among those who paid any attention to their work, was that in rejecting everything that came after the young Raphael and seeking inspiration in the Italian “primitives,” they had taken the wrong road and ended up in a cul-de-sac, in contrast to contemporaries such as Géricault and Delacroix, Constable and Turner, who had taken the road that led, without break, to modernity. To the Nazarenes, (...)
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  36. Francis Donald Klingender (1945). Marxism and Modern Art. New York, International Publishers.score: 84.0
     
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  37. Mara Miller (2008). Review of Literati Modern: Bunjinga From Late-Edo to Twentieth-Century Japan. [REVIEW] College Art Association on-Line Reviews 2008 (22):22-23.score: 84.0
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  38. Julian Young (2001). Heidegger and Modern Art. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
  39. Jacob Korg (1960). Modern Art Techniques in the Waste Land. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 18 (4):456-463.score: 78.0
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  40. Roger Seamon (2001). The Conceptual Dimension in Art and the Modern Theory of Artistic Value. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (2):139–151.score: 78.0
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  41. Peg Brand (2007). Painting the Difference: Sex and Spectator in Modern Art by Harrison, Charles. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (2):244–246.score: 78.0
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  42. Johannes H. Birringer (1983). Constructions of the Spirit: The Struggle for Transfiguration in Modern Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (2):137-150.score: 78.0
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  43. Steven Barbone (2011). Inspiration and Technique: Ancient to Modern Views on Beauty and Art Edited by Roe, John and Michele Stanco. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (3):338-340.score: 78.0
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  44. Justino Fernández (1964). An Aesthetic of Mexican Art: Ancient and Modern. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 23 (1):21-28.score: 78.0
  45. Roger Seamon (1997). From the World is Beautiful to the Family of Man: The Plight of Photography as a Modern Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (3):245-252.score: 78.0
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  46. Joseph C. Sloane (1948). The Tradition of Figure Painting and Concepts of Modern Art in France From 1845 to 1870. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 7 (1):1-29.score: 78.0
  47. Christopher Williams (1998). Modern Art Theories. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (4):377-389.score: 78.0
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  48. Ismail Tunali (1963). The Validity of Modern Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 22 (2):161-163.score: 78.0
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  49. Albert Elsen (1960). Lively Art From a Dying Profession, the Role of the Modern Artist. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 18 (4):446-455.score: 78.0
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  50. Anthony Grafton (2007). What Was History?: The Art of History in Early Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press.score: 78.0
    From the late-fifteenth century onwards, scholars across Europe began to write books about how to read and evaluate histories. These pioneering works - which often take surprisingly modern-sounding positions - grew from complex early modern debates about law, religion, and classical scholarship. In this book, based on the Trevelyan Lectures of 2005, Anthony Grafton explains why so many of these works were written, why they attained so much insight - and why, in the centuries that followed, most scholars (...)
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