Search results for 'Arthur C. Caplan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. G. McGee & A. L. Caplan (2000). " Small Sacrifices" in Stem Cell Research-Glenn McGee and Arthur Caplan Reply. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (1):104-107.score: 1260.0
     
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  2. Arthur C. Caplan (1980). Have Species Become Declasse? Psa 1980:71-82.score: 960.0
    Traditionally, species have been treated as classes or kinds in philosophical discussions of systematics and evolutionary biology. Recently a number of biologists and philosophers have proposed a drastic revision of this traditional ontological categorization. They have argued that species ought be viewed as individuals rather than as classes or natural kinds. In this paper an attempt is made to show that (a) the reasons advanced in support of this new view of species are not persuasive, (b) a reasonable explication can (...)
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  3. Peter C. Adamson, Carmen Paradis, Martin L. Smith, Nicholas Agar, Jacob M. Appel, David Benatar, Nancy Berlinger, Daniel Brudney, Lucy M. Candib & Arthur L. Caplan (2007). Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 37 of the Hastings Center Report, Covering All Feature Material From 2007. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 37 (2007) and May Be Purchased for $16.00 Each, Plus Shipping. Please Contact the Circulation Department, The Hastings Center, 21 Malcolm Gordon Road, Garrison, NY 10524; Tel.:(845) 424-4040; Fax:(845) 424-4545; E-Mail: Publications@ Thehastingscenter. Org. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 37.score: 810.0
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  4. Arthur L. Caplan, Daniel Callahan & Janet Haas (1987). Ethical & Policy Issues in Rehabilitation Medicine. Hastings Center Report 17 (4):1-20.score: 480.0
    The field of medical rehabilitation is relatively new.... Until recently, the ethical problems of this new field were neglected. There seemed to be more pressing concerns as rehabilitation medicine struggled to establish itself, sometimes in the face of considerable skepticism or hostility. There also seemed no pressing moral questions of the kind and intensity to be encountered, say, in high-technology acute care medicine or genetic engineering.... Those in biomedical ethics could and did easily overlook the quiet, less obtrusive issues of (...)
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  5. Arthur L. Caplan (1980). Have Species Become Déclassé? PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:71 - 82.score: 450.0
    Traditionally, species have been treated as classes or kinds in philosophical discussions of systematics and evolutionary biology. Recently a number of biologists and philosophers have proposed a drastic revision of this traditional ontological categorization. They have argued that species ought be viewed as individuals rather than as classes or natural kinds. In this paper an attempt is made to show that (a) the reasons advanced in support of this new view of species are not persuasive, (b) a reasonable explication can (...)
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  6. Van R. Potter (1981). Bioethics: State-of-the-Art Books The Hastings Center: A Major Series of Studies on the Teaching of Ethics in Higher Education: I. The Teaching of Ethics in Higher Education: A Report by the Hastings Center The Hastings Center The Hastings Center: A Major Series of Studies on the Teaching of Ethics in Higher Education: IV. Teaching Bioethics: Strategies, Problems, and Resources K. Danner Clouser The Hastings Center: A Major Series of Studies on the Teaching of Ethics in Higher Education: VIII. Ethical Dilemmas and the Education of Policymakers Joel L. Fleishman Bruce L. Payne The Hastings Center: A Major Series of Studies on the Teaching of Ethics in Higher Education: IX. Ethics in the Undergraduate Curriculum Bernard Rosen Arthur L. Caplan Ethics Teaching in Higher Education Daniel Callahan Sissela Bok Bioethics: A Textbook of Issues George H. Kieffer A Search for Environmental Ethics: An Initial Bibliography Mary Anglemyer Eleanor R. Seagraves Catherine C. Le Maistre. [REVIEW] BioScience 31 (2):172-172.score: 435.0
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  7. Glenn McGee & Arthur L. Caplan (1999). The Ethics and Politics of Small Sacrifices in Stem Cell Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (2):151-158.score: 240.0
    : Pluripotent human stem cell research may offer new treatments for hundreds of diseases, but opponents of this research argue that such therapy comes attached to a Faustian bargain: cures at the cost of the destruction of many frozen embryos. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC), government officials, and many scholars of bioethics, including, in these pages, John Robertson, have not offered an adequate response to ethical objections to stem cell research. Instead of examining the ethical issues involved in sacrificing (...)
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  8. Arthur L. Caplan (1992). Does the Philosophy of Medicine Exist? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (1):67-77.score: 240.0
    There has been a great deal of discussion, in this journal and others, about obstacles hindering the evolution of the philosophy of medicine. Such discussions presuppose that there is widespread agreement about what it is that constitutes the philosophy of medicine.Despite the fact that there is, and has been for decades, a great deal of literature, teaching and professional activity carried out explicitly in the name of the philosophy of medicine, this is not enough to establish that consensus exists as (...)
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  9. Robert I. Field Arthur L. Caplan (2008). A Proposed Ethical Framework for Vaccine Mandates: Competing Values and the Case of HPV. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (2):pp. 111-124.score: 240.0
    Debates over vaccine mandates raise intense emotions, as reflected in the current controversy over whether to mandate the vaccine against human papilloma virus (HPV), the virus that can cause cervical cancer. Public health ethics so far has failed to facilitate meaningful dialogue between the opposing sides. When stripped of its emotional charge, the debate can be framed as a contest between competing ethical values. This framework can be conceptualized graphically as a conflict between autonomy on the one hand, which militates (...)
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  10. Arthur Caplan (2011). The Use of Prisoners as Sources of Organs–An Ethically Dubious Practice. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (10):1 - 5.score: 240.0
    The movement to try to close the ever-widening gap between demand and supply of organs has recently arrived at the prison gate. While there is enthusiasm for using executed prisoners as sources of organs, there are both practical barriers and moral concerns that make it unlikely that proposals to use prisoners will or should gain traction. Prisoners are generally not healthy enough to be a safe source of organs, execution makes the procurement of viable organs difficult, and organ donation post-execution (...)
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  11. Jon F. Merz, Arthur L. Caplan & Dana Katz (2010). All Gifts Large and Small: Toward an Understanding of the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Industry Gift-Giving. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (10):11-17.score: 240.0
    Much attention has been focused in recent years on the ethical acceptability of physicians receiving gifts from drug companies. Professional guidelines recognize industry gifts as a conflict of interest and establish thresholds prohibiting the exchange of large gifts while expressly allowing for the exchange of small gifts such as pens, note pads, and coffee. Considerable evidence from the social sciences suggests that gifts of negligible value can influence the behavior of the recipient in ways the recipient does not always realize. (...)
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  12. Arthur L. Caplan (1983). Book Review:Sociobiology and the Preemption of Social Science. Alexander Rosenberg; The Expanding Circle: Ethics and Sociobiology. Peter Singer. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (3):603-.score: 240.0
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  13. Arthur L. Caplan (1988). Book Review:The Foundations of Bioethics. H. T. Engelhardt, Jr. [REVIEW] Ethics 98 (2):402-.score: 240.0
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  14. Ellen Matloff & Arthur Caplan (2008). Direct to Confusion: Lessons Learned From Marketing Brca Testing. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):5 – 8.score: 240.0
    Myriad Genetics holds a patent on testing for the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, and therefore has a forced monopoly on this critical genetic test. Myriad launched a Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) marketing campaign in the Northeast United States in September 2007 and plans to expand that campaign to Florida and Texas in 2008. The ethics of Myriad's patent, forced monopoly and DTC campaign will be reviewed, as well as the impact of this situation on patient access and (...)
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  15. B. Caplan & C. Muller (forthcoming). Against a Defense of Fictional Realism. Philosophical Quarterly.score: 240.0
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  16. Arthur Caplan (2007). Is It Sound Public Policy to Let the Terminally Ill Access Experimental Medical Innovations? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):1 – 3.score: 240.0
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  17. Louis W. Hodges, Mark Douglas, Rick Kenney, Christine Dellert & Arthur L. Caplan (2006). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (2 & 3):215 – 228.score: 240.0
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  18. Glenn McGee & Arthur Caplan (2007). Playing [with] God: Prayer is Not a Prescription. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):1.score: 240.0
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  19. Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.) (2013). Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons.score: 240.0
    Are there universal ethical principles that should govern the conduct of medicine and research worldwide? -- Is it morally acceptable to buy and sell organs for human transplantation? -- Were it physically safe, would human reproductive cloning be acceptable? -- Is the deliberately induced abortion of a human pregnancy ethically justifiable? -- Is it ethical to patent or copyright genes, embryos, or their parts? -- Should minors have the right to refuse treatment, even when against the will of their parents (...)
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  20. Arthur L. Caplan (1986). Exemplary Reasoning? A Comment on Theory Structure in Biomedicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 11 (1):93-105.score: 240.0
    The contributions that the philosophy of medicine can make to both the philosophy of science and the practice of science have been obscured in recent years by an overemphasis on personalities rather than critical themes. Two themes have dominated general discussion within contemporary philosophy of science: methodological essentialism and dynamic gradualism. These themes are defined and considered in light of Kenneth Schaffner's argument that theories in biomedicine have a structure and logic unlike that found in theories of the natural sciences. (...)
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  21. Arthur L. Caplan (2013). It Is Not Morally Acceptable to Buy and Sell Organs for Human Transplantation. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons. 25--59.score: 240.0
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  22. Kyle Powys Whyte, Evan Selinger, Arthur L. Caplan & Jathan Sadowski (2012). Nudge, Nudge or Shove, Shove—The Right Way for Nudges to Increase the Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):32-39.score: 240.0
    Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein (2008) contend that mandated choice is the most practical nudge for increasing organ donation. We argue that they are wrong, and their mistake results from failing to appreciate how perceptions of meaning can influence people's responses to nudges. We favor a policy of default to donation that is subject to immediate family veto power, includes options for people to opt out (and be educated on how to do so), and emphasizes the role of organ procurement (...)
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  23. Arthur Caplan (2010). Blood Stains—Why an Absurd Policy Banning Gay Men as Blood Donors Has Not Been Changed. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):1-2.score: 240.0
  24. Arthur L. Caplan (1983). Can Applied Ethics Be Effective in Health Care and Should It Strive to Be? Ethics 93 (2):311-319.score: 240.0
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  25. Arthur Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2004). Health, Disease, and Illness: Concepts in Medicine. Georgetown University Press.score: 240.0
    Health, Disease, and Illness brings together a sterling list of classic and contemporary thinkers to examine the history, state, and future of ever-changing "concepts" in medicine.
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  26. Arthur L. Caplan, Constance Marie Perry, Lauren A. Plante, Joseph Saloma & Frances R. Batzer (2007). Moving the Womb. Hastings Center Report 37 (3):18-20.score: 240.0
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  27. Arthur L. Caplan & Robert G. Franke (1980). Values Education in Science Courses. BioScience 30 (8):500-500.score: 240.0
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  28. Dana Katz, Arthur L. Caplan & Jon F. Merz (2003). All Gifts Large and Small. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):39-46.score: 240.0
    Much attention has been focused in recent years on the ethical acceptability of physicians receiving gifts from drug companies. Professional guidelines recognize industry gifts as a conflict of interest and establish thresholds prohibiting the exchange of large gifts while expressly allowing for the exchange of small gifts such as pens, note pads, and coffee. Considerable evidence from the social sciences suggests that gifts of negligible value can influence the behavior of the recipient in ways the recipient does not always realize. (...)
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  29. Donya Khalili & Arthur Caplan (2007). Off the Grid: Vaccinations Among Homeschooled Children. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (3):471-477.score: 240.0
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  30. Barbara Redman & Arthur Caplan (forthcoming). No One Likes a Snitch. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-7.score: 240.0
    Whistleblowers remain essential as complainants in allegations of research misconduct. Frequently internal to the research team, they are poorly protected from acts of retribution, which may deter the reporting of misconduct. In order to perform their important role, whistleblowers must be treated fairly. Draft regulations for whistleblower protection were published for public comment almost a decade ago but never issued (Dahlberg 2013). In the face of the growing challenge of research fraud, we suggest vigorous steps, to include: organizational responsibility to (...)
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  31. Arthur Caplan (1978). Testability, Disreputability, and the Structure of the Modern Synthetic Theory of Evolution. Erkenntnis 13 (1):261 - 278.score: 240.0
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  32. Arthur Caplan (1976). Book Review:Sociobiology Edward O. Wilson. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 43 (2):305-.score: 240.0
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  33. Arthur L. Caplan (1979). Darwinism and Deductivist Models of Theory Structure. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 10 (4):341-353.score: 240.0
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  34. Arthur L. Caplan (1979). "Ethics" and "Values" in Education: Are the Concepts Distinct and Does It Make a Difference? Educational Theory 29 (3):245-253.score: 240.0
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  35. Arthur Caplan (1978). Medical Fallibility and Malpractice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (3):169-186.score: 240.0
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  36. Arthur Caplan (2013). The Year Is 2000; The Year Is 2025. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):3-4.score: 240.0
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  37. James N. Kirkpatrick, Kara D. Beasley & Arthur Caplan (2009). Death Is Just Not What It Used to Be. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (01):7-.score: 240.0
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  38. Barbara K. Redman & Arthur L. Caplan (2005). Off with Their Heads: The Need to Criminalize Some Forms of Scientific Misconduct. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):345-346.score: 240.0
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  39. James F. Blumstein, Arthur Caplan, Kazumasa Hoshino, Mark Siegler & John D. Lantos (1992). Commentary: Liver-Donors Liver Transplants. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (04):307-.score: 240.0
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  40. Arthur L. Caplan (1981). Back to Class: A Note on the Ontology of Species. Philosophy of Science 48 (1):130-140.score: 240.0
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  41. Arthur L. Caplan (1985). If There's A Will, Is There A Way? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 13 (1):32-34.score: 240.0
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  42. Arthur Caplan (2009). Is the Perfect the Enemy of the Good? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (4):624-627.score: 240.0
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  43. Arthur L. Caplan (2006). No Method, Thus Madness? Hastings Center Report 36 (2):12-13.score: 240.0
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  44. Arthur L. Caplan (2010). Rethinking Life. Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 1 (1):77-78.score: 240.0
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  45. Arthur L. Caplan (1984). Sociobiology as a Strategy in Science. The Monist 67 (2):143-160.score: 240.0
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  46. Robert I. Field & Arthur L. Caplan (2008). A Proposed Ethical Framework for Vaccine Mandates: Competing Values and the Case of HPV. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (2):111-124.score: 240.0
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  47. Glenn Mcgee, Joshua P. Spanogle, Arthur L. Caplan, Dina Penny & David A. Asch (2002). Successes and Failures of Hospital Ethics Committees: A National Survey of Ethics Committee Chairs. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):87-93.score: 240.0
    In 1992, the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) passed a mandate that all its approved hospitals put in place a means for addressing ethical concerns.Although the particular process the hospital uses to address such concernsmay vary, the hospital or healthcare ethics committee (HEC) is used most often. In a companion study to that reported here, we found that in 1998 over 90% of U.S. hospitals had ethics committees, compared to just 1% in 1983, and that many (...)
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  48. Arthur L. Caplan (1996). Book Review:The Least Worst Death: Essays in Bioethics on the End of Life. Margaret Pabst Battin. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (4):876-.score: 240.0
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  49. Arthur L. Caplan & Thomas A. Marino (2007). The Role of Scientists in the Beginning-of-Life Debate: A 25-Year Retrospective. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (4):603-613.score: 240.0
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  50. Arthur L. Caplan (1998). What's So Special About the Human Genome? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):422-424.score: 240.0
    Glenn McGee argues that the time is now for debating the morality of patenting human genes. In one sense he is surely right. While thousands of patents have been issued or are pending on many gene sequences, public policy with respect to ownership of the human genome is still far from settled. So a debate about the ethics of patenting genes is, if nothing else, timely. In another sense however, Professor McGee is wrong.
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