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Profile: Arthur J. Caplan (Utah State University)
  1. Edward O. Wilson, Arthur L. Caplan, Daniel G. Freedman & Michael Ruse (1982). On Human Nature. Ethics 92 (2):327-340.
     
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  2.  4
    Tuua Ruutiainen, Steve Miller, Arthur Caplan & Jill P. Ginsberg (2013). Expanding Access to Testicular Tissue Cryopreservation: An Analysis by Analogy. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (3):28 - 35.
    Researchers are developing a fertility preservation technique?testicular tissue cryopreservation (TTCP)?for prepubescent boys who may become infertile as a result of their cancer treatment. Although this technique is still in development, some researchers are calling for its widespread use. They argue that if boys do not bank their tissue now, they will be unable to benefit from any therapies that might be developed in the future. There are, however, risks involved with increasing access to an investigational procedure. This article examines four (...)
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  3.  14
    Arthur L. Caplan, Carolyn Plunkett & Bruce Levin (2015). Selecting the Right Tool For the Job. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):4-10.
    There are competing ethical concerns when it comes to designing any clinical research study. Clinical trials of possible treatments for Ebola virus are no exception. If anything, the competing ethical concerns are exacerbated in trying to find answers to a deadly, rapidly spreading, infectious disease. The primary goal of current research is to identify experimental therapies that can cure Ebola or cure it with reasonable probability in infected individuals. Pursuit of that goal must be methodologically sound, practical and consistent with (...)
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  4.  4
    Arthur L. Caplan, Carolyn Plunkett & Bruce Levin (2015). The Perfect Must Not Overwhelm the Good: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Selecting the Right Tool For the Job”. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):W8 - W10.
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  5.  6
    Arthur L. Caplan (1981). Pick Your Poison: Historicism, Essentialism, and Emergentism in the Definition of Species. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):285.
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  6.  16
    Glenn McGee, Joshua P. Spanogle, Arthur L. Caplan & David A. Asch (2001). A National Study of Ethics Committees. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):60-64.
    Conceived as a solution to clinical dilemmas, and now required by organizations for hospital accreditation, ethics committees have been subject only to small-scale studies. The wide use of ethics committees and the diverse roles they play compel study. In 1999 the University of Pennsylvania Ethics Committee Research Group (ECRG) completed the first national survey of the presence, composition, and activities of U.S. healthcare ethics committees (HECs). Ethics committees are relatively young, on average seven years in operation. Eighty-six percent of ethics (...)
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  7.  33
    Arthur Caplan (2011). The Use of Prisoners as Sources of Organs–An Ethically Dubious Practice. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (10):1 - 5.
    The movement to try to close the ever-widening gap between demand and supply of organs has recently arrived at the prison gate. While there is enthusiasm for using executed prisoners as sources of organs, there are both practical barriers and moral concerns that make it unlikely that proposals to use prisoners will or should gain traction. Prisoners are generally not healthy enough to be a safe source of organs, execution makes the procurement of viable organs difficult, and organ donation post-execution (...)
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  8.  13
    Kyle Powys Whyte, Evan Selinger, Arthur L. Caplan & Jathan Sadowski (2012). Nudge, Nudge or Shove, Shove—The Right Way for Nudges to Increase the Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):32-39.
    Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein (2008) contend that mandated choice is the most practical nudge for increasing organ donation. We argue that they are wrong, and their mistake results from failing to appreciate how perceptions of meaning can influence people's responses to nudges. We favor a policy of default to donation that is subject to immediate family veto power, includes options for people to opt out (and be educated on how to do so), and emphasizes the role of organ procurement (...)
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  9.  12
    Arthur L. Caplan (1981). Back to Class: A Note on the Ontology of Species. Philosophy of Science 48 (1):130-140.
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  10.  13
    Glenn Mcgee, Joshua P. Spanogle, Arthur L. Caplan, Dina Penny & David A. Asch (2002). Successes and Failures of Hospital Ethics Committees: A National Survey of Ethics Committee Chairs. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):87-93.
    In 1992, the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) passed a mandate that all its approved hospitals put in place a means for addressing ethical concerns.Although the particular process the hospital uses to address such concernsmay vary, the hospital or healthcare ethics committee (HEC) is used most often. In a companion study to that reported here, we found that in 1998 over 90% of U.S. hospitals had ethics committees, compared to just 1% in 1983, and that many (...)
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  11.  8
    Dana Katz, Arthur L. Caplan & Jon F. Merz (2003). All Gifts Large and Small. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):39-46.
    Much attention has been focused in recent years on the ethical acceptability of physicians receiving gifts from drug companies. Professional guidelines recognize industry gifts as a conflict of interest and establish thresholds prohibiting the exchange of large gifts while expressly allowing for the exchange of small gifts such as pens, note pads, and coffee. Considerable evidence from the social sciences suggests that gifts of negligible value can influence the behavior of the recipient in ways the recipient does not always realize. (...)
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  12.  14
    Ellen Matloff & Arthur Caplan (2008). Direct to Confusion: Lessons Learned From Marketing Brca Testing. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):5 – 8.
    Myriad Genetics holds a patent on testing for the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, and therefore has a forced monopoly on this critical genetic test. Myriad launched a Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) marketing campaign in the Northeast United States in September 2007 and plans to expand that campaign to Florida and Texas in 2008. The ethics of Myriad's patent, forced monopoly and DTC campaign will be reviewed, as well as the impact of this situation on patient access and (...)
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  13.  51
    Glenn Mcgee & Arthur L. Caplan (1999). What's in the Dish? Hastings Center Report 29 (2):36-38.
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  14.  28
    Jon F. Merz, Arthur L. Caplan & Dana Katz (2010). All Gifts Large and Small: Toward an Understanding of the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Industry Gift-Giving. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (10):11-17.
    Much attention has been focused in recent years on the ethical acceptability of physicians receiving gifts from drug companies. Professional guidelines recognize industry gifts as a conflict of interest and establish thresholds prohibiting the exchange of large gifts while expressly allowing for the exchange of small gifts such as pens, note pads, and coffee. Considerable evidence from the social sciences suggests that gifts of negligible value can influence the behavior of the recipient in ways the recipient does not always realize. (...)
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  15.  43
    Arthur Caplan (2014). Why Autonomy Needs Help. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):301-302.
    Some argue that to be effective in healthcare settings autonomy needs to be strengthened. The author thinks autonomy is fundamentally inadequate in healthcare settings and requires supplementation by experience-based paternalism on the part of doctors and healthcare providers.
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  16.  1
    Baruch Brody, Nancy Dubler, Jeff Blustein, Arthur Caplan, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Nancy Kass, Bernard Lo, Jonathan Moreno, Jeremy Sugarman & Laurie Zoloth (2002). The Task Force Responds. Hastings Center Report 32 (3):22-23.
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  17.  19
    George Annas, Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, John D. Arras, Mary Ann Baily, Françoise Baylis, Leah Belsky, Henry S. Richardson, Michael Bérubé, Alistair Campbell & Arthur Caplan (2004). Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 34 of the Hastings Center Report Covering All Feature Material From 2004. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 34 (2004) and May Be Purchased for $16.00 Each, Plus Shipping. Please Contact the Membership Department, The Hastings Center, 21 Malcolm Gordon Road, Garrison, NY 10524-5555; Tel.:(845) 424-4040; Fax:(845) 424-4545; E-Mail: Publications@ Thehastingscenter. Org. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 34.
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  18.  85
    Barbara Redman & Arthur Caplan (2015). No One Likes a Snitch. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (4):813-819.
    Whistleblowers remain essential as complainants in allegations of research misconduct. Frequently internal to the research team, they are poorly protected from acts of retribution, which may deter the reporting of misconduct. In order to perform their important role, whistleblowers must be treated fairly. Draft regulations for whistleblower protection were published for public comment almost a decade ago but never issued. In the face of the growing challenge of research fraud, we suggest vigorous steps, to include: organizational responsibility to certify the (...)
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  19.  3
    Arthur L. Caplan & Edward J. Bergman (2007). Beyond Schiavo. Journal of Clinical Ethics 18 (4):340.
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  20.  1
    Arthur Caplan & Alison Bateman-House (2014). Compassion for Each Individual's Own Sake. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (11):16-17.
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  21.  6
    Arthur L. Caplan (2005). "Who Lost China?" A Foreshadowing of Today's Ideological Disputes in Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 35 (3):12-13.
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  22.  23
    Arthur L. Caplan (2004). What's Morally Wrong with Eugenics. In Arthur Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.), Health, Disease, and Illness: Concepts in Medicine. Georgetown University Press
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  23.  2
    Scott D. Halpern, Peter A. Ubel & Arthur L. Caplan (forthcoming). Solid-Organ Transplantation in HIV-Infected Patients. Center for Bioethics Papers.
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  24.  14
    Arthur L. Caplan, Constance Marie Perry, Lauren A. Plante, Joseph Saloma & Frances R. Batzer (2007). Moving the Womb. Hastings Center Report 37 (3):18-20.
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  25.  12
    Arthur Caplan (2007). Is It Sound Public Policy to Let the Terminally Ill Access Experimental Medical Innovations? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):1 – 3.
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  26.  10
    Mark D. Fox, Glenn Mcgee & Arthur Caplan (1998). Paradigms for Clinical Ethics Consultation Practice. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (3):308-314.
    Clinical bioethics is big business. There are now hundreds of people who bioethics in community and university hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation and home care settings, and some who play the role of clinical ethics consultant to transplant teams, managed care companies, and genetic testing firms. Still, there is as much speculation about what clinically active bioethicists actually do as there was ten years ago. Various commentators have pondered the need for training standards, credentials, exams, and malpractice insurance for ethicists engaged (...)
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  27.  71
    Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2006). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.
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  28.  11
    Arthur L. Caplan & David Magnus (2003). New Life Forms: New Threats, New Possibilities. Hastings Center Report 33 (7).
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  29. H. Tristram Engelhardt & Arthur L. Caplan (1987). Scientific Controversies Case Studies in the Resolution and Closure of Disputes in Science and Technology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  30.  33
    Arthur Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2004). Health, Disease, and Illness: Concepts in Medicine. Georgetown University Press.
    Health, Disease, and Illness brings together a sterling list of classic and contemporary thinkers to examine the history, state, and future of ever-changing "concepts" in medicine.
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  31.  3
    Arthur L. Caplan (1994). [Book Review] If I Were a Rich Man, Could I Buy a Pancreas? And Other Essays on the Ethics of Health Care. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 24 (1):43-44.
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  32.  1
    Arthur Caplan (2004). Facing Ourselves. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):18 – 20.
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  33. Arthur L. Caplan, H. Tristram Engelhardt & James J. McCartney (eds.) (1981). Concepts of Health and Disease: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Addison-Wesley, Advanced Book Program/World Science Division.
     
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  34.  6
    Vardit Ravitsky, Autumn Fiester & Arthur L. Caplan (eds.) (2009). The Penn Center Guide to Bioethics. Springer Publishing Company.
    This book will also inform the general public, patients, and family members as they seek answers to the bioethical issues of the day.
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  35.  4
    Bruce Jennings, Daniel Callahan & Arthur L. Caplan (1988). Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness. Hastings Center Report 18 (1):1-16.
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  36.  2
    Susan Benedict, Arthur Caplan & Traute Lafrenz Page (2007). Duty and 'Euthanasia': The Nurses of Meseritz-Obrawalde. Nursing Ethics 14 (6):781-794.
    This article examines the actions and testimonies of 14 nurses who killed psychiatric patients at the state hospital of Meseritz-Obrawalde in the Nazi 'euthanasia' program. The nurses provided various reasons for their decisions to participate in the killings. An ethical analysis of the testimonies demonstrates that a belief in the relief of suffering, the notion that the patients would 'benefit' from death, their selection by physicians for the 'treatment' of 'euthanasia', and a perceived duty to obey unquestioningly the orders of (...)
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  37. Arthur L. Caplan (2009). Good, Better or Best. In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. OUP Oxford 199--209.
  38. Arthur L. Caplan (1992). Does the Philosophy of Medicine Exist? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (1):67-77.
    There has been a great deal of discussion, in this journal and others, about obstacles hindering the evolution of the philosophy of medicine. Such discussions presuppose that there is widespread agreement about what it is that constitutes the philosophy of medicine.Despite the fact that there is, and has been for decades, a great deal of literature, teaching and professional activity carried out explicitly in the name of the philosophy of medicine, this is not enough to establish that consensus exists as (...)
     
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  39.  4
    Arthur L. Caplan (1991). Bioethics on Trial. Hastings Center Report 21 (2):19-20.
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  40.  8
    Barbara K. Redman & Arthur L. Caplan (2005). Off with Their Heads: The Need to Criminalize Some Forms of Scientific Misconduct. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 33 (2):345-346.
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  41.  9
    Arthur L. Caplan (1983). Can Applied Ethics Be Effective in Health Care and Should It Strive to Be? Ethics 93 (2):311-319.
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  42.  13
    James N. Kirkpatrick, Kara D. Beasley & Arthur Caplan (2010). Death Is Just Not What It Used to Be. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (1):7.
    It is said there are only two things in life that are certain: death and taxes … maybe only taxes.
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  43.  12
    Arthur Caplan (2010). Blood Stains—Why an Absurd Policy Banning Gay Men as Blood Donors Has Not Been Changed. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):1-2.
  44.  5
    Arthur L. Caplan (1983). Organ Transplants: The Costs of Success. Hastings Center Report 13 (6):23-32.
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  45.  6
    Arthur Caplan (2016). A Panglossian Analysis of the Abortion Controversy. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (4):9-9.
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  46.  8
    Arthur L. Caplan (1986). The Ethics of Uncertainty: The Regulation of Food Safety in the United States. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 3 (1-2):180-190.
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  47. Arthur L. Caplan & Lynn Gillam (1996). When Medicine Went Mad: Bioethics and the Holocaust. Bioethics 10 (2):180-181.
     
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  48.  9
    Arthur L. Caplan (2002). Review of Our Posthuman Future_, _The Future Is Now: America Confronts the New Genetics_, and _Redesigning Humans: Our Inevitable Genetic Future. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):57-61.
    (2002). Review of Our Posthuman Future, The Future Is Now: America Confronts the New Genetics, and Redesigning Humans: Our Inevitable Genetic Future. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 2, No. 3, pp. 57-61.
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  49.  6
    Arthur L. Caplan & Thomas A. Marino (2007). The Role of Scientists in the Beginning-of-Life Debate: A 25-Year Retrospective. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (4):603-613.
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  50.  3
    Robert I. Field & Arthur L. Caplan (2008). A Proposed Ethical Framework for Vaccine Mandates: Competing Values and the Case of HPV. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (2):111-124.
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