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  1. Arthur E. Falk (2007). What Divides Us Today. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 7:45-49.
    According to philosophical naturalism, the main anti-naturalism in philosophy derives from Kant and depends on transcendental arguments, which are invalid or polemically toothless. Many of naturalism's characteristic features follow from this repudiation of Kantian method. Anti-naturalists should be aware that the rationale for naturalism depends on this attack on their own position. There remains for philosophy a distinctively philosophical role that depends on the indexical element in our thought, the role of elaborating a scientific worldview.
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  2. Arthur E. Falk (2004). Desire and Belief: Introduction to Some Recent Philosophical Debates. Hamilton Books, University Press of America.
    This work examines the nature of what philosophers call de re mental attitudes, paying close attention to the controversies over the nature of these and allied...
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  3. David Lapoujade Translated, Richard Dewitt, Daniel A. Dombrowski, Arthur E. Falk, Ellen K. Feder, Harry G. Frankfurt, Harry J. Gensler, Earl W. Spurgin, James C. Swindal & Martin Heidegger (2004). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056. Teaching Philosophy 27:199.
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  4. Arthur E. Falk (2003). Perceiving Temporal Passage. In Amita Chatterjee (ed.), Perspectives on Consciousness. New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal.
  5. Arthur E. Falk (1998). The Judger in Russell's Theories of Judgment. Russell 17:101-122.
    Russell's concept of the self as relevant to semantics, distinct from the psychological concept, evolved from a judger with no complexity of relevance to semantics to a mind with much relevant complexity. The evolution transformed his semantic conceptions: He reassessed what constitutes intentionality, giving up his theory of acquaintance as the aboriginal intentional relation, favoring a contextually constituted intentionality in his theory of neutral monism. His anti-idealism extricated itself from an unwarranted antirepresentationalism. Truth went from being an adverb of acts (...)
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  6. Arthur E. Falk (1997). Mathieu Marion and Robert S. Cohen, Eds., Québec Studies in the Philosophy of Science. Part I: Logic, Mathematics, Physics, and History of Science. Essays in Honor of Hugues Leblanc Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 17 (1):50-51.
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  7. Arthur E. Falk (1996). Terence Irwin and Gail Fine, Trans., Aristotle: Selections Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (1):29-30.
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  8. Arthur E. Falk (1995). Consciousness and Self-Reference. Erkenntnis 43 (2):151-80.
    Reflection on the self's way of being "in" consciousness yields two arguments for a theory of self-reference not based in any way all all on self-cognition. First, I show that one theory of self-reference predicts an experience of the self because the theory inadequately analyzes the semantical facts about indexicality. I construct a dilemma for this cognitivism, which it cannot get out of, for it requires even solitary self-reference to be based on some original self-knowledge, which is not available. I (...)
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  9. Arthur E. Falk (1995). Essay on Nature's Semeiosos. Journal of Philosophical Research 20:297-348.
    In this two-part essay I develop a theory of natural signs. Since even primordial signs signify values, in the first part I develop the theory’s valuative aspect. Goods are as primary in nature as facts are, and together facts and values generate semeiosis in all life without excess extrapolation from human psychology. To ward off over-extrapolating on values, I defend a major discontinuity between man and nature on the goods of ethics. In the essay’s second part I develop the semeiotic (...)
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  10. Arthur E. Falk (1985). Ifs and Newcombs. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):449 - 481.
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  11. Arthur E. Falk (1984). Selfhood, Modality, and Philosophies of Mind. Metaphilosophy 15 (2):100–111.
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  12. Arthur E. Falk (1984). The Forbearance of an Instantaneous Angel. Modern Schoolman 61 (2):101-116.
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  13. Arthur E. Falk (1981). On Some Modal Confusions in Compatibilism. American Philosophical Quarterly 18 (April):141-48.
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  14. Arthur E. Falk (1981). Purpose, Feedback, and Evolution. Philosophy of Science 48 (2):198-217.
    This essay develops a theory of natural signs in order to show how evolutionary theory breathes new life into teleology. An argument to the contrary presented by Richard Taylor is refuted. The essay defends the view that the concept of negative feedback explicates purposiveness and that symbiotic evolution explains the occurrence of naturally adapted feedback systems. But evolution itself is not a teleological process, nor is it a negative feedback system. There is an exploration of the nature of the dissatisfaction (...)
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  15. Arthur E. Falk (1975). Learning to Report One's Introspections. Philosophy of Science 42 (September):223-241.
    The author argues for a purely naturalistic underpinning of the linguistic practice of reporting one's introspections. In doing so he avoids any commitments about the ontological status of entities referred to in introspective reports. He also presents evidence of the inadequacy of peripheralistic behaviorism as a naturalistic underpinning of introspective reports. The paper includes (a) a definition of 'introspection' and criticism of alternative definitions, (b) a classification scheme that sorts introspections into six different types, and (c) a presentation of evidence (...)
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  16. Arthur E. Falk (1966). Scholasticism In The Modern World. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 40:203-208.
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  17. Arthur E. Falk (1966). Two Conceptions of a Logic of Discovery. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 40:203-208.
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