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  1. Arthur I. Miller (2009). Deciphering the Cosmic Number. W.W. Norton & Co..
    Arthur I. Miller is a master at capturing the intersection of creativity and intelligence. He did it with Einstein and Picasso, and now he does it with Pauli and Jung. Their shared obsession with the number 137 provides a window into their genius. --Walter Isaacson.
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  2. Arthur I. Miller (2007). Unconscious Thought, Intuition, and Visual Imagery: A Critique of "Working Memory, Cerebellum, and Creativity". Creativity Research Journal 19 (1):47-48.
  3. Arthur I. Miller (2006). Unipolar Induction: A Case Study of the Interaction Between Science and Technology. Annals of Science 38 (2):155-189.
    Unipolar induction, discovered in 1832 by Michael Faraday, is the case of electromagnetic induction in which a conductor and magnet are in relative rotatory motion. Attempts by scientists and engineers in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to understand unipolar induction by using magnetic lines of force displayed striking national differences that influenced where the first largescale unipolar dynamo was built. This episode is described, as well as the effect of unipolar induction on Albert Einstein's thinking toward the special theory of (...)
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  4. Arthur I. Miller (1997). A Glimpse Into the Poincaré Archives. Philosophia Scientiae 2 (3):51-72.
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  5. Arthur I. Miller (1996/2000). Insights of Genius: Imagery and Creativity in Science and Art. Mit Press.
     
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  6. Arthur I. Miller & Frederick W. Bullock (1994). Neutral Currents and the History of Scientific Ideas. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (6):895-931.
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  7. Arthur I. Miller (1991). Have Incommensurability and Causal Theory of Reference Anything to Do with Actual Science?—Incommensurability, No; Causal Theory, Yes. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (2):97 – 108.
    Abstract I propose to support these replies with actual episodes in late nineteenth and twentieth century physics. The historical record reveals that meaning does change but not in the Kuhnian manner which is tied to descriptive theories of meaning. A necessary part of this discussion is commentary on realist versus antirealist conceptions of science.
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  8. Arthur I. Miller (1991). Imagery and Meaning, the Cognitive Science Connection. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (1):35 – 48.
    Abstract Taking the integrated viewpoints of causal theory of reference, cognitive science and the notion of correspondence principles from physics, this paper addresses the problems of creativity, the nature of visual imagery and the manner in which science progresses.
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  9. Julian B. Barbour, Michel Bitbol, Arthur I. Miller & Rom Harré (1990). Holism and Iconicity in Physics Papers Read at Linacre College, Oxford, 17 November 1990. [S.N.
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  10. Arthur I. Miller (1989). 12. Imagery, Metaphor, and Physical Reality. In Barry Gholson (ed.), Psychology of Science: Contributions to Metascience. Cambridge University Press. 326.
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  11. Arthur I. Miller (1984/1986). Imagery in Scientific Thought: Creating 20th-Century Physics. Mit Press.
     
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  12. Arthur I. Miller (1982). On Einstein's Invention of Special Relativity. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:377 - 402.
    A scenario is conjectured for Einstein's invention of the special theory of relativity that receives support over the widest possible number of archival, primary and secondary sources. This scenario takes into account the philosophical-physical-technological currents of 1905.
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  13. Arthur I. Miller (1978). A Reply to 'Some New Aspects of Relativity: Comments on Zahar's Paper'. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 29 (3):252-256.
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  14. Arthur I. Miller (1974). On Lorentz's Methodology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (1):29-45.