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  1.  3
    Arthur Isak Applbaum (2000). Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life. Princeton University Press.
    The adversary professions--law, business, and government, among others--typically claim a moral permission to violate persons in ways that, if not for the professional role, would be morally wrong. Lawyers advance bad ends and deceive, business managers exploit and despoil, public officials enforce unjust laws, and doctors keep confidences that, if disclosed, would prevent harm. Ethics for Adversaries is a philosophical inquiry into arguments that are offered to defend seemingly wrongful actions performed by those who occupy what Montaigne called "necessary offices."Applbaum (...)
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  2. Arthur Isak Applbaum (2010). Legitimacy Without the Duty to Obey. Philosophy and Public Affairs 38 (3):215-239.
  3. David Estlund, Kok‐Chor Tan, Sophia Reibetanz, Susan J. Brison, Arthur Isak Applbaum, Tamara Horowitz, Elinor Mason & Jeff McMahan (1998). 10. Notes on Contributors Notes on Contributors (P. 460). In Stephen Everson (ed.), Ethics. Cambridge University Press
     
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  4.  53
    Arthur Isak Applbaum (2007). Forcing a People to Be Free. Philosophy and Public Affairs 35 (4):359–400.
  5.  26
    Arthur Isak Applbaum (2014). Bayesian Inference and Contractualist Justification on Interstate 95. In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley Blackwell 219.
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  6.  75
    Arthur Isak Applbaum (1998). Are Violations of Rights Ever Right? Ethics 108 (2):340-366.
  7.  76
    Arthur Isak Applbaum (1992). Democratic Legitimacy and Official Discretion. Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (3):240-274.
  8.  11
    Arthur Isak Applbaum (1998). Are Lawyers Liars?: The Argument of Redescription. Legal Theory 4 (1):63-91.
    In “Professional Detachment: The Executioner of Paris,” I concluded with the cheap and some would say libelous suggestion that lawyers might accurately be described as serial liars, because they repeatedly try to induce others to believe in the truth of propositions or in the validity of arguments that they believe to be false. Good lawyers have responded with some indignation that, in calling zealous advocacy “lying,” I have misdescribed the practice of law. I wish to explain why I believe that (...)
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    Arthur Isak Applbaum (2000). Part IV. Authority and Dissent. In Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life. Princeton University Press 205-260.
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  10. Arthur Isak Applbaum (2000). Acknowledgments. In Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life. Princeton University Press
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  11. Arthur Isak Applbaum (2000). Contents. In Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life. Princeton University Press
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  12. Arthur Isak Applbaum (2000). Index. In Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life. Princeton University Press 263-273.
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  13. Arthur Isak Applbaum (2000). Part III. Games and Violations. In Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life. Princeton University Press 111-204.
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  14. Arthur Isak Applbaum (2000). Part I. Necessary Offices. In Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life. Princeton University Press 1-42.
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  15. Arthur Isak Applbaum (2000). Part II. Roles and Reasons. In Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life. Princeton University Press 43-110.
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  16. Arthur Isak Applbaum (2000). Sources and Credits. In Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life. Princeton University Press 261-262.
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