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  1. Arthur J. Dyck (2009). Christian Ethics in the Twenty-First Century: New Directions. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):565-575.
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  2. Arthur J. Dyck & Carlos Padilla (2009). The Empathic Emotions and Self-Love in Bishop Joseph Butler and the Neurosciences. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):577-612.
    In Joseph Butler, we have an account of human beings as moral beings that is, as this essay demonstrates, being supported by the recently emerging findings of the neurosciences. This applies particularly to Butler's portrayal of our empathic emotions. Butler discovered their moral significance for motivating and guiding moral decisions and actions before the neurosciences did. Butler has, in essence, added a sixth sense to our five senses: this is the moral sense by means of which we perceive what we (...)
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  3. Lenny López & Arthur J. Dyck (2009). Educating Physicians for Moral Excellence in the Twenty-First Century. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):651-668.
    Medical professionals are a community of highly educated individuals with a commitment to a core set of ideals and principles. This community provides both technical and ethical socialization. The ideal physician is confident, empathic, forthright, respectful, and thorough. These ideals allow us to define broadly "the excellence" of being a physician. At the core of these ideals is the ability to be empathic. Empathy exhibits itself in attributes of an individual's moral character and also in actions that actualize and support (...)
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  4. Arthur J. Dyck (2005). Comment. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):375-393.
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  5. Arthur J. Dyck (2005). Letters, Notes and Comments. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):375 - 393.
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  6. Arthur J. Dyck (2002). Life's Worth: The Case Against Assisted Suicide. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..
    But as Harvard ethicist Arthur J. Dyck shows in this powerful work, there are solid moral and practical bases for the existing laws against assisted suicide in ...
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  7. Arthur J. Dyck (1997). Rethinking Rights, Preserving Community: How My Mind Has Changed. Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (1):3 - 14.
    Just below the surface of public life in the United States, a biblically based theory of rights vies with a theory that first appeared in the work of Bentham and Mill, and the latter is gaining increasing dominance. The resolution of this conflict has implications for a host of legal matters and public policy decisions, including life and death issues like physician-assisted suicide. Though the ascendancy of the Millian tradition reflects widespread skepticism concerning the possibility of developing a basis for (...)
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  8. Arthur J. Dyck (1981). Moral Requiredness: Bridging the Gap Between "Ought" and "Is": Part II. Journal of Religious Ethics 9 (1):131 - 150.
    Part I of this essay described "Ought" and "Value" as forms of moral requiredness. Now in Part II, a description of the ideal conditions for veridical perceptions of moral requiredness are specified. This is done in the form of an ideal observer type of analysis. This analysis is defended against those who oppose naturalism by assuming a bifurcation between 'ought' and 'is' and those who accuse naturalism of a "naturalistic fallacy." It is argued that theistic versions of the ideal observer (...)
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  9. Arthur J. Dyck (1978). Moral Requiredness: Bridging the Gap Between "Ought" and "Is": Part I. Journal of Religious Ethics 6 (2):293 - 318.
    This is the first of two essays concerned to specify in what sense "ought" and "value" are genuine characteristics of reality serving as data that help us empirically verify the truth and falsity of our moral judgments. This, the first, essay discusses the significance of the ought/is question for moral philosophy and theological ethics, giving reasons for the inadequacy of current views on the relation between "ought" and "is." Building on the perceptual theories of Gestalt psychologists yields a phenomenological description (...)
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  10. Arthur J. Dyck (1977). An Ethical Analysis of Population Policy Alternatives. The Monist 60 (1):29-46.
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  11. Arthur J. Dyck (1977). Alternative Views of Moral Priorities in Population Policy. Bioscience 27 (4):272-276.
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  12. Arthur J. Dyck (1973). A Unified Theory of Virtue and Obligation. Journal of Religious Ethics 1:37 - 52.
    Contemporary moral philosophy tends to equate what is moral with what is obligatory. Hence, there is a tendency to exclude all virtues from what is moral because they are dispositions other than the one morally good disposition to fulfill obligations out of a sense of obligation. This has the effect of excluding much of what we admire about persons from moral philosophy and from the moral life. This essay argues that there are at least two virtues, both forms of (...)
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