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  1. Arash Aryani, Markus Conrad & Arthur M. Jacobs (2013). Extracting Salient Sublexical Units From Written Texts: “Emophon,” a Corpus-Based Approach to Phonological Iconicity. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    A growing body of literature in psychology, linguistics, and the neurosciences has paid increasing attention to the understanding of the relationships between phonological representations of words and their meaning: a phenomenon also known as phonological iconicity. In this article, we investigate how a text’s intended emotional meaning, particularly in literature and poetry, may be reflected at the level of sublexical phonological salience and the use of foregrounded elements. To extract such elements from a given text, we developed a probabilistic model (...)
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  2. Eeva Anita Elliott & Arthur M. Jacobs (2013). Facial Expressions, Emotions, and Sign Languages. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Facial expressions are used by humans to convey various types of meaning in various contexts. The range of meanings spans basic possibly innate socio-emotional concepts such as ‘surprise’ to complex and culture specific concepts such as ‘carelessly’. The range of contexts in which humans use facial expressions spans responses to events in the environment to particular linguistic constructions within sign languages. In this mini review we summarize findings on the use and acquisition of facial expressions by signers and present a (...)
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  3. Moritz Matejka Matejka, Philipp Kazzer, Maria Seehausen, Malek Bajbouj, Gisela Margrit Klann-Delius, Gisela, Winfried Menninghaus, Arthur M. Jacobs, Hauke R. Heekeren & Kristin Prehn (2013). Talking About Emotion: Prosody and Skin Conductance Indicate Emotion Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Talking about emotion and putting feelings into words has been hypothesized to regulate emotion in psychotherapy as well as in everyday conversation. However, the exact dynamics of how different strategies of verbalization regulate emotion and how these strategies are reflected in characteristics of the voice has received little scientific attention. In the present study, we showed emotional pictures to 30 participants and asked them to verbally admit or deny an emotional experience or a neutral fact concerning the picture in a (...)
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  4. Chris F. Westbury, Cyrus Shaoul, Geoff Hollis, Lisa Smithson, Benny B. Briesemeister, Markus J. Hofmann & Arthur M. Jacobs (2013). Now You See It, Now You Don't: On Emotion, Context, & the Algorithmic Prediction of Human Imageability Judgments. Frontiers in Psychology 4:991.
    Many studies have shown that behavioral measures are affected by manipulating the imageability of words. Though imageability is usually measured by human judgment, little is known about what factors underlie those judgments. We demonstrate that imageability judgments can be largely or entirely accounted for by two computable measures that have previously been associated with imageability, the size and density of a word’s context and the emotional associations of the word. We outline an algorithmic method for predicting imageability judgments using co-occurrence (...)
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  5. Isabel C. Bohrn, Ulrike Altmann, Oliver Lubrich, Winfried Menninghaus & Arthur M. Jacobs (2012). Old Proverbs in New Skins – An fMRI Study on Defamiliarization. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    We investigated how processing fluency and defamiliarization contribute to the affective and aesthetic processing of reading in an event-related fMRI experiment with 26 participants. We compared the neural correlates of processing (a) familiar German proverbs, (b) unfamiliar proverbs, (c) twisted variations which altered the concept of the original proverb (anti-proverbs), (d) variations with incorrect wording but the same concept as the original proverb (violated proverbs), and (e) non-rhetorical sentences. We report processing differences between anti-proverbs and violated proverbs. Anti-proverbs triggered a (...)
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  6. Arthur M. Jacobs (2012). Comment on Walter's “Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Empathy: Concepts, Circuits, and Genes”. Emotion Review 4 (1):20-21.
    In his review, Walter (2012) links conceptual perspectives on empathy with crucial results of neurocognitive and genetic studies and presents a descriptive neurocognitive model that identifies neuronal key structures and links them with both cognitive and affective empathy via a high and a low road. After discussion of this model, the remainder of this comment deals more generally with the possibilities and limitations of current neurocognitive models, considering ways to develop process models allowing specific quantitative predictions.
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  7. Tila Tabea Brink, Karolina Urton, Dada Held, Evgeniya Kirilina, Markus Hofmann, Gisela Klann-Delius, Arthur M. Jacobs & Lars Kuchinke (2011). The Role of Orbitofrontal Cortex in Processing Empathy Stories in 4- to 8-Year-Old Children. Frontiers in Psychology 2:80.
    This study investigates the neuronal correlates of empathic processing in children aged 4 to 8 years, an age range discussed to be crucial for the development of empathy. Empathy, defined as the ability to understand and share another person’s inner life, consists of two components: affective (emotion-sharing) and cognitive empathy (Theory of Mind). We examined the hemodynamic responses of pre-school and school children (N=48), while they processed verbal (auditory) and non-verbal (cartoons) empathy stories in a passive following paradigm, using functional (...)
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  8. Markus Conrad, Guillermo Recio & Arthur M. Jacobs (2011). The Time Course of Emotion Effects in First and Second Language Processing: A Cross Cultural ERP Study with German–Spanish Bilinguals. Frontiers in Psychology 2.
    To investigate whether second language processing is characterized by the same sensitivity to the emotional content of language – as compared to native language processing – we conducted an EEG study manipulating word emotional valence in a visual lexical decision task. Two groups of late bilinguals – native speakers of German and Spanish with sufficient proficiency in their respective second language - performed each a German and a Spanish version of the task containing identical semantic material: translations of words in (...)
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  9. Markus Josef Hofmann, Lars Kuchinke, Chris Biemann, Sascha Tamm & Arthur M. Jacobs (2011). Remembering Words in Context as Predicted by an Associative Read-Out Model. Frontiers in Psychology 2:252-252.
    Interactive Activation Models (IAMs) simulate orthographic and phonological processes in implicit memory tasks, but they neither account for associative relations between words nor explicit memory performance. To overcome both limitations, we introduce the Associative Read-Out Model (AROM), an IAM extended by an associative layer implementing long-term associations between words. According to Hebbian learning, two words were defined as ‘associated’ if they co-occurred significantly often in the sentences of a large corpus. In a study-test task, a greater amount of associated items (...)
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  10. Arnaud Rey, Johannes C. Ziegler & Arthur M. Jacobs (2000). Graphemes Are Perceptual Reading Units. Cognition 75 (1):B1-B12.
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  11. Arthur M. Jacobs & Jonathan Grainger (1999). Modeling a Theory Without a Model Theory, or, Computational Modeling “After Feyerabend”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):46-47.
    Levelt et al. attempt to “model their theory” with WEAVER++. Modeling theories requires a model theory. The time is ripe for a methodology for building, testing, and evaluating computational models. We propose a tentative, five-step framework for tackling this problem, within which we discuss the potential strengths and weaknesses of Levelt et al.'s modeling approach.
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  12. Arthur M. Jacobs, R.Ö & Frank Sler (1999). Dondersian Dreams in Brain-Mappers' Minds, or, Still No Cross-Fertilization Between Mind Mappers and Cognitive Modelers? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):293-295.
    Pulvermüller identifies two major flaws of the subtraction method of neuroimaging studies and proposes remedies. We argue that these remedies are themselves flawed and that the cognitive science community badly needs to take initial steps toward a cross-fertilization between mind mappers and cognitive modelers. Such steps could include the development of computational task models that transparently and falsifiably link the input (stimuli) and output (changes in blood flow or brain waves) of neuroimaging studies to changes in information processing activity that (...)
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  13. Arthur M. Jacobs & Johannes C. Ziegler (1997). Has Glenberg Forgotten His Nurse? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):26-27.
    Glenberg's conception of “meaning from and for action” is too narrow. For example, it provides no satisfactory account of the “logic of Elfland,” a metaphor used by Chesterton to refer to meaning acquired by being told something. All that we call spirit and art and ecstasy only means that for one awful instant we remember that we forget. G. K. Chesterton (in Gardner 1994, p. 101).
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  14. Arthur M. Jacobs & Thomas H. Carr (1995). Mind Mappers and Cognitive Modelers: Toward Cross-Fertilization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):362.
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  15. Arthur M. Jacobs (1994). On Computational Theories and Multilevel, Multitask Models of Cognition: The Case of Word Recognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):670.
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  16. Tatjana A. Nazir, J. Kevin O'Regan & Arthur M. Jacobs (1991). On Words and Their Letters. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (2):171-174.
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