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  1. Kimberly A. Strong, Arthur R. Derse, David P. Dimmock, Kaija L. Zusevics, Jessica Jeruzal, Elizabeth Worthey, David Bick, Gunter Scharer, Alison La Pean Kirschner, Ryan Spellecy, Michael H. Farrell, Jennifer Geurts, Regan Veith & Thomas May (2014). In the Absence of Evidentiary Harm, Existing Societal Norms Regarding Parental Authority Should Prevail. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):24-26.
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  2. Eric Kodish, Joseph J. Fins, Clarence Braddock, Felicia Cohn, Nancy Neveloff Dubler, Marion Danis, Arthur R. Derse, Robert A. Pearlman, Martin Smith, Anita Tarzian, Stuart Youngner & Mark G. Kuczewski (2013). Quality Attestation for Clinical Ethics Consultants: A Two‐Step Model From the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. Hastings Center Report 43 (5):26-36.
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  3. Arthur R. Derse (2012). Decision-Making Capacity. In D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.), Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Cambridge University Press. 55.
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  4. Arthur R. Derse (2009). When I Lay My Burden Down: Commentary on Berger. Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (2):172.
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  5. Arthur R. Derse & Tracy E. Miller (2008). Net Effect: Professional and Ethical Challenges of Medicine Online. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (04):453-464.
    From computerized medical records to databases of pharmacological interactions and automated provisional EKG readings, the emergence of information technology has significantly altered the practice of medicine. Information technology has been widely used to enhance diagnosis and treatment and to improve communication between providers. The advent of the Internet also brings far-reaching implications for patient–physician communication, challenging physicians, patients, and policymakers to consider its impact on the delivery of medical care and the therapeutic relationship. A new set of practices by patients (...)
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  6. Arthur R. Derse (2007). Is Patients' Time Too Valuable for Informed Consent? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):45 – 46.
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  7. Arthur R. Derse (2006). Emergency Research and Consent: Keeping the Exception From Undermining the Rule. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (3):36 – 37.
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  8. Arthur R. Derse (2005). The Seven-Year Itch. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):1 – 5.
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  9. Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Alister Browne, Nuket Buken, Murat Civaner, Arthur R. Derse, Brent Dickson, Dan Eastwood, Todd Gilmer & Michael L. Gross (2003). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing at the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12:229-231.
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  10. Robyn S. Shapiro, Kristen A. Tym, Dan Eastwood, Arthur R. Derse & John P. Klein (2003). Managed Care, Doctors, and Patients: Focusing on Relationships, Not Rights. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (03):300-307.
  11. Arthur R. Derse (2000). Is There a Lingua Franca for Bioethics at the End of Life? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):279-284.
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  12. Robyn S. Shapiro, Kristen A. Tym, Jeffrey L. Gudmundson, Arthur R. Derse & John P. Klein (2000). Managed Care: Effects on the Physician-Patient Relationship. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (01):71-81.
    Over the past several years, healthcare has been profoundly altered by the growth of managed care. Because managed care integrates the financing and delivery of healthcare services, it dramatically alters the roles and relationships among providers, payers, and patients. While analysis of this change has focused on whether and how managed care can control costs, an increasingly important concern among healthcare providers and recipients is the impact of managed care on the physicianpatient relationship, but little data have been collected and (...)
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  13. Zlatko Anguelov, Piero Antuono, Jan Beyer, G. J. Boer, David J. Casarett, David Checkland, Jan De Lepeleire, Pieter F. De Vries Robbé, Arthur R. Derse & Edmund L. Erde (1999). Index to Volume 20. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20:599-603.
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  14. Arthur R. Derse (1999). Making Decisions About Life-Sustaining Medical Treatment in Patients with Dementia. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (1):55-67.
    The problem of decision-making capacity in patients with dementia, such as those with early stage Alzheimer's, can be vexing, especially when these patients refuse life-sustaining medical treatments. However, these patients should not be presumed to lack decision-making capacity. Instead, an analysis of the patient's decision-making capacity should be made. Patients who have some degree of decision-making capacity may be able to make a choice about life-sustaining medical treatment and may, in many cases, choose to forgo treatment.
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  15. Gregory Luke Larkin, James E. Weber & Arthur R. Derse (1999). Universal Emergency Access Under Managed Care: Universal Doubt or Mission Impossible? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):213-225.
    Appropriate concerns about cost and unequal access to healthcare have resulted in the creation of powerful managed networks seeking to share the risks of high healthcare costs among plans, providers, and patients. Much to their credit, these managed networks have slowed the rise in healthcare spending by as much as 44% in markets with high HMO penetration. However, whether these savings will materially improve access and quality remains to be seen.
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  16. Paul J. Reitemeier & Arthur R. Derse (1997). Commentary. Hastings Center Report 27 (1):24-25.
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