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  1. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1959). Space, Time, and Gravitation. New York, Harper.
  2. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1958). The Philosophy of Physical Science. [Ann Arbor]University of Michigan Press.
    The lectures have afforded me an opportunity of developing more fully than in my earlier books the principles of philosophic thought associated with the modern advances of physical science. It is often said that there is no "philosophy of ...
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  3. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1955). The Nature of the Physical World. London, Dent.
    1929. The course of Gifford Lectures that Eddington delivered in the University of Edinburgh in January to March 1927.
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  4. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1946). Fundamental Theory. Cambridge [Eng.]The University Press.
     
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  5. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1943). The Combination of Relativity Theory and Quantum Theory. Institute for Advanced Studies.
     
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  6. Arthur S. Eddington (1941). Group Structure in Physical Science. Mind 50 (199):268-279.
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  7. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1936). Relativity Theory of Protons and Electrons. Cambridge, Eng.,The University Press.
     
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  8. Arthur S. Eddington (1933). Physics and Philosophy. Philosophy 8 (29):30 - 43.
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  9. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1930). The Mathematical Theory of Relativity. Cambridge [Eng.]The University Press.
  10. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1920/1966). Space, Time, and Gravitation: An Outline of the General Relativity Theory. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.
    The aim of this book is to give an account of Einstein's work without introducing anything very technical in the way of mathematics, physics, or philosophy.
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