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  1. Leib Litman & Arthur S. Reber (2005). Implicit Cognition and Thought. In K. Holyoak & B. Morrison (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning. Cambridge Univ Pr. 431--453.
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  2. Leonid Litman & Arthur S. Reber (2002). Rules, Abstractions, and Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):345-346.
    Perruchet & Vinter's article, for all its breadth and scope, has several deep problems: specifically, an eccentric notion of rule, a narrow notion of what it means for a mental instantiation to be abstract, and a failure to take into account fundamental principles of evolutionary biology. While not the only problems, these three are sufficient to seriously weaken their arguments.
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  3. Arthur S. Reber & Robert F. Allen (2000). Individual Differences in Implicit Learning: Implications for the Evolution of Consciousness. In Robert G. Kunzendorf & B. Alan Wallace (eds.), Individual Differences in Conscious Experience. John Benjamin.
     
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  4. Arthur S. Reber (1997). Caterpillars and Consciousness. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):437-49.
    The dominant position in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) is computationalism where the operative principle is that cognition in general and consciousness in particular can be captured by identification of the proper set of computations. This position has been attacked from several angles, most effectively, in my opinion, by John Searle in his now famous Chinese Room thought experiment. I critique this Searlean perspective on the grounds that, while it is probably correct in its essentials, it does not go (...)
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  5. Arthur S. Reber (1997). How to Differentiate Implicit and Explicit Modes of Acquisition. In Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.), Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum. 137--159.
  6. Arthur S. Reber (1993). Implicit Learning and Tacit Knowledge: An Essay on the Cognitive Unconscious. Oxford University Press.
    In this new volume in the Oxford Psychology Series, the author presents a highly readable account of the cognitive unconscious, focusing in particular on the problem of implicit learning. Implicit learning is defined as the acquisition of knowledge that takes place independently of the conscious attempts to learn and largely in the absence of explicit knowledge about what was acquired. One of the core assumptions of this argument is that implicit learning is a fundamental, "root" process, one that lies at (...)
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  7. Arthur S. Reber (1992). An Evolutionary Context for the Cognitive Unconscious. Philosophical Psychology 5 (1):33-51.
    This paper is an attempt to put the work of the past several decades on the problems of implicit learning and unconscious cognition into an evolutionary context. Implicit learning is an inductive process whereby knowledge of a complex environment is acquired and used largely independently of awareness of either the process of acquisition or the nature of that which has been learned. Characterized this way, implicit learning theory can be viewed as an attempt to come to grips with the classic (...)
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  8. Arthur S. Reber (1992). The Cognitive Unconscious: An Evolutionary Perspective. Consciousness and Cognition 1 (2):93-133.
  9. Arthur S. Reber (1989). Implicit Learning and Tacit Knowledge. Journal of Experimental Psychology 118:219-35.
  10. Arthur S. Reber (1987). The Rise and (Surprisingly Rapid) Fall of Psycholinguistics. Synthese 72 (September):325-339.
    Psycholinguistics re-emerged in an almost explosive fashion during the 1950s and 1960s. It then underwent an equally abrupt decline as an independent sub-discipline. This paper charts this fall and identifies five general factors which, it is argued, were responsible for its demise. These are: (a) an uncompromisingly strong version of nativism; (b) a growing isolation of psycholinguistics from the body psychology; (c) a preference for formal theory over empirical data; (d) several abrupt modifications in the Standard Theory in linguistics; and (...)
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  11. Arthur S. Reber, Robert F. Allen & S. Regan (1985). Syntactical Learning and Judgment, Still Unconscious and Still Abstract: Comment on Dulany, Carlson, and Dewey. Journal of Experimental Psychology 114:17-24.
  12. Arthur S. Reber & Rhianon Allen (1978). Analogic and Abstraction Strategies in Synthetic Grammar Learning: A Functionalist Interpretation. Cognition 6 (3):189-221.
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  13. Arthur S. Reber (1969). Transfer of Syntactic Structure in Synthetic Languages. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):115.
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  14. Arthur S. Reber & Richard B. Millward (1968). Event Observation in Probability Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (2):317.
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  15. Arthur S. Reber (1967). Implicit Learning of Artificial Grammars. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior 6:855-863.