Search results for 'Artificial intelligence Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joseph Y. Halpern, International Business Machines Corporation, American Association of Artificial Intelligence, United States & Association for Computing Machinery (1986). Theoretical Aspects of Reasoning About Knowledge Proceedings of the 1986 Conference, March 19-22, 1986, Monterey, California. [REVIEW] Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  2. John Bryant (1991). Systems Theory and Scientific Philosophy: An Application of the Cybernetics of W. Ross Ashby to Personal and Social Philosophy, the Philosophy of Mind, and the Problems of Artificial Intelligence. Upa.
    Systems Theory and Scientific Philosophy constitutes a totally new approach to philosophy, the philosophy of mind and the problems of artificial intelligence, and is based upon the pioneering work in cybernetics of W. Ross Ashby. While science is humanity's attempt to know how the world works and philosophy its attempt to know why, scientific philosophy is the application of scientific techniques to questions of philosophy.
     
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  3.  8
    Maurits Kaptein, Panos Markopoulos, Boris Ruyter & Emile Aarts (2011). Two Acts of Social Intelligence: The Effects of Mimicry and Social Praise on the Evaluation of an Artificial Agent. [REVIEW] AI and Society 26 (3):261-273.
    This paper describes a study of the effects of two acts of social intelligence, namely mimicry and social praise, when used by an artificial social agent. An experiment ( N = 50) is described which shows that social praise—positive feedback about the ongoing conversation—increases the perceived friendliness of a chat-robot. Mimicry—displaying matching behavior—enhances the perceived intelligence of the robot. We advice designers to incorporate both mimicry and social praise when their system needs (...)
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  4.  33
    Raimo Tuomela (1996). Philosophy and Distributed Artificial Intelligence: The Case of Joint Intention. In N. Jennings & G. O'Hare (eds.), Foundations of Distributed Artificial Intelligence. Wiley
    In current philosophical research the term 'philosophy of social action' can be used - and has been used - in a broad sense to encompass the following central research topics: 1) action occurring in a social context; this includes multi-agent action; 2) joint attitudes (or "we-attitudes" such as joint intention, mutual belief) and other social attitudes needed for the explication and explanation of social action; 3) social macro-notions, such as actions performed by social groups (...)
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  5.  34
    Steven Torrance (ed.) (1984). The Mind And The Machine: Philosophical Aspects Of Artificial Intelligence. Chichester: Horwood.
  6. Pompeu Casanovas Romeu (ed.) (2007). Trends in Legal Knowledge: The Semantic Web and the Regulation of Electronic Social Systems: Papers From the B-4 Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Law, May 25th- 27th 2005: Xxii World Congress of Philosophy Ivr '05 Granada, May 24th-29th 2005. [REVIEW] European Press Academic Pub..
  7.  3
    Michail Zak (2016). Non-Newtonian Aspects of Artificial Intelligence. Foundations of Physics 46 (5):517-553.
    The challenge of this work is to connect physics with the concept of intelligence. By intelligence we understand a capability to move from disorder to order without external resources, i.e., in violation of the second law of thermodynamics. The objective is to find such a mathematical object described by ODE that possesses such a capability. The proposed approach is based upon modification of the Madelung version of the Schrodinger equation by replacing the force following from quantum potential with (...)
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  8.  8
    Cristiano Castelfranchi & Rosaria Conte (1996). Distributed Artificial Intelligence and Social Science: Critical Issues. In N. Jennings & G. O'Hare (eds.), Foundations of Distributed Artificial Intelligence. Wiley
  9.  9
    Richard Ennals (1987). Socially Useful Artificial Intelligence. AI and Society 1 (1):5-15.
    Artificial intelligence is presented as a set of tools with which we can try to come to terms with human problems, and with the assistance of which, some human problems can be solved. Artificial intelligence is located in its social context, in terms of the environment within which it is developed, and the applications to which it is put. Drawing on social theory, there is consideration of the collaborative and social problem-solving processes which (...)
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  10.  9
    Achille Ardigo (1988). Artificial Intelligence: A Contribution to Systems Theories of Sociology. [REVIEW] AI and Society 2 (2):113-120.
    The aim of my contribution is to try to analyse some points of similarity and difference between post-Parsonian social systems theory models for sociology — with special reference to those of W. Buckley, F.E. Emery and N. Luhmann — and expert systems models1 from Artificial Intelligence. I keep specifically to post-Parsonian systems theories within sociology because they assume some postulates and criteria derived from cybernetics and which are at the roots of AI. I refer in particular to (...)
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  11.  2
    Maria Miceli, Amedo Cesta & Paola Rizzo (1995). Distributed Artificial Intelligence From a Socio-Cognitive Standpoint: Looking at Reasons for Interaction. [REVIEW] AI and Society 9 (4):287-320.
    Distributed Artificial Intelligence (DAI) deals with computational systems where several intelligent components interact in a common environment. This paper is aimed at pointing out and fostering the exchange between DAI and cognitive and social science in order to deal with the issues of interaction, and in particular with the reasons and possible strategies for social behaviour in multi-agent interaction is also described which is motivated by requirements of cognitive plausibility and grounded the notions of power, dependence (...)
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  12. Tama Leaver (2011). Artificial Culture: Identity, Technology and Bodies. Routledge.
     
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  13.  9
    Bruce Edmonds, The Social Embedding of Intelligence.
    I claim that in order to pass the Turing Test over any period of extended time, it will necessary to embed the entity into society. This chapter discusses why this is, and how it might be brought about. I start by arguing that intelligence is better characterised by tests of social interaction, especially in open-ended and extended situations. I then argue that learning is an essential component of intelligence and hence that a universal intelligence is impossible. (...)
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  14. Joanna Bryson (1st ed. 2015). Artificial Intelligence and Pro-Social Behaviour. In Catrin Misselhorn (ed.), Collective Agency and Cooperation in Natural and Artificial Systems. Springer International Publishing
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  15.  43
    Pascal Acot, Sandrine Charles & Marie-Laure Delignette-Muller (2000). Artificial Intelligence and Meaning — Some Philosophical Aspects of Decision-Making. Acta Biotheoretica 48 (3-4):173-179.
  16. M. A. Boden (1990). The Social Impact of Artificial Intelligence. In R. Kurzweil (ed.), The Age of Intelligent Machines. MIT Press 450--453.
  17. Marcus Hutter (2012). One Decade of Universal Artificial Intelligence. In Pei Wang & Ben Goertzel (eds.), Theoretical Foundations of Artificial General Intelligence. Springer 67--88.
    The first decade of this century has seen the nascency of the first mathematical theory of general artificial intelligence. This theory of Universal Artificial Intelligence (UAI) has made significant contributions to many theoretical, philosophical, and practical AI questions. In a series of papers culminating in book (Hutter, 2005), an exciting sound and complete mathematical model for a super intelligent agent (AIXI) has been developed and rigorously analyzed. While nowadays most AI researchers avoid discussing intelligence, the (...)
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  18.  24
    Gill Kirkup (ed.) (2000). The Gendered Cyborg: A Reader. Routledge in Association with the Open University.
    The Gendered Cyborg brings together material from a variety of disciplines that analyze the relationship between gender and technoscience, and the way that this relationship is represented through ideas, language and visual imagery. The book opens with key feminist articles from the history and philosophy of science. They look at the ways that modern scientific thinking has constructed oppositional dualities such as objectivity/subjectivity, human/machine, nature/science, and male/female, and how these have constrained who can engage in science/technology and how they have (...)
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  19.  3
    Maurits Kaptein, Panos Markopoulos, Boris de Ruyter & Emile Aarts (2011). Two Acts of Social Intelligence: The Effects of Mimicry and Social Praise on the Evaluation of an Artificial Agent. AI and Society 26 (3):261-273.
  20. James H. Fetzer (1990). Artificial Intelligence: Its Scope and Limits. Kluwer.
    1. WHAT IS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE? One of the fascinating aspects of the field of artificial intelligence (AI) is that the precise nature of its subject ..
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  21.  7
    Margaret Boden (1987). Artificial Intelligence: Cannibal or Missionary? [REVIEW] AI and Society 1 (1):17-23.
    Some of the concerns people have about AI are: its misuses, effect on unemployment, and its potential for dehumanising. Contrary to what most people believe and fear, AI can lead to respect for the enormous power and complexity of the human mind. It is potentially very dangerous for users in the public domain to impute much more inferential power to computer systems, which look common-sensical, than they actually have. No matter how impressive AI programs may be, we must be aware (...)
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  22.  17
    Frederick Kile (2013). Artificial Intelligence and Society: A Furtive Transformation. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (1):107-115.
    During the 1950s, there was a burst of enthusiasm about whether artificial intelligence might surpass human intelligence. Since then, technology has changed society so dramatically that the focus of study has shifted toward society’s ability to adapt to technological change. Technology and rapid communications weaken the capacity of society to integrate into the broader social structure those people who have had little or no access to education. (Most of the recent use of communications by the excluded (...)
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  23.  5
    Tim Smithers (1988). Product Creation: An Appropriate Coupling of Human and Artificial Intelligence. [REVIEW] AI and Society 2 (4):341-353.
    Small batch manufacture dominates the manufacturing sector of a growing number of industrialised countries. The organisational structures and management methods currently adopted in such enterprises are firmly based upon historical developments which started with individual craftsmen. These structures and methods are primarily concerned with the co-ordination of human activities, rather than with the management of theknowledge process underlying the creation of products.This paper argues that it is the failure to understand this knowledge process and its effective integration at aKnowledge Level (...)
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  24.  5
    Massimo Negrotti (1987). The Piping of Thought and the Need for a Permanent Monitoring of the Cultural Effects of Artificial Intelligence. AI and Society 1 (2):85-91.
    Over the years, AI has undergone a transformation from its original aim of producing an ‘intelligent’ machine to that of producing pragmatic solutions of problems of the market place. In doing so, AI has made a significant contribution to the debate on whether the computer is an instrument or an interlocutor. This paper discusses issues of problem solving and creativity underlying this transformation, and attempts to clarify the distinction between theresolutive intelligence andproblematic intelligence. It points out that the (...)
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  25. Maurizio Cardaci, Antonella D'Amico & Barbara Caci (2007). The Social Cognitive Theory: A New Framework for Implementing Artificial Consciousness. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic 116-123.
  26.  4
    Michael Paetau (1991). 'Adaptive' and 'Cooperative' Computer Systems — A Challenge for Sociological Research. AI and Society 5 (1):61-70.
    The vision of the new generation of office systems is based on the hypothesis that an automatic support system is all the more useful and acceptable, the more systems behaviour and performance are in accordance with features ofhuman behaviour. Consequently recent development activities are influenced by the paradigm of the computer as man's “cooperative assistant”. The metaphors ofassistance andcooperation illustrate some major requirements to be met by new office systems. Cooperative office systems will raise a set of new questions about (...)
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  27.  14
    Johanna Seibt, Raul Hakli & Marco Nørskov (eds.) (2014). Sociable Robots and the Future of Social Relations: Proceedings of Robo-Philosophy 2014. IOS Press.
    The robotics industry is growing rapidly, and to a large extent the development of this market sector is due to the area of social robotics – the production of robots that are designed to enter the space of human social interaction, both physically and semantically. Since social robots present a new type of social agent, they have been aptly classified as a disruptive technology, i.e. the sort of technology which affects the core of our current (...) practices and might lead to profound cultural and social change. -/- Due to its disruptive and innovative potential, social robotics raises not only questions about utility, ethics, and legal aspects, but calls for “robo-philosophy” – the comprehensive philosophical reflection from the perspectives of all philosophical disciplines. This book presents the proceedings of the first conference in this new area, “Robo-Philosophy 2014 – Sociable Robots and the Future of Social Relations", held in Aarhus, Denmark, in August 2014. The short papers and abstracts collected here address questions of social robotics from the perspectives of philosophy of mind, social ontology, ethics, meta-ethics, political philosophy, aesthetics, intercultural philosophy, and metaphilosophy. -/- Social robotics is still in its early stages, but it is precisely now that we need to reflect its possible cultural repercussions. This book is accessible to a wide readership and will be of interest to everyone involved in the development and use of social robotics applications, from social roboticists to policy makers. (shrink)
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  28.  7
    Jack G. Conrad (2010). E-Discovery Revisited: The Need for Artificial Intelligence Beyond Information Retrieval. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (4):321-345.
    In this work, we provide a broad overview of the distinct stages of E-Discovery. We portray them as an interconnected, often complex workflow process, while relating them to the general Electronic Discovery Reference Model (EDRM). We start with the definition of E-Discovery. We then describe the very positive role that NIST’s Text REtrieval Conference (TREC) has added to the science of E-Discovery, in terms of the tasks involved and the evaluation of the legal discovery work performed. Given the critical nature (...)
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  29.  85
    Bruce Edmonds (2000). The Constructability of Artificial Intelligence. Journal of Logic Language and Information 9 (4):419-424.
    The Turing Test, as originally specified, centres on theability to perform a social role. The TT can be seen as a test of anability to enter into normal human social dynamics. In this light itseems unlikely that such an entity can be wholly designed in anoff-line mode; rather a considerable period of training insitu would be required. The argument that since we can pass the TT,and our cognitive processes might be implemented as a Turing Machine, that consequently a (...)
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  30.  40
    B. Edmonds (2000). The Constructibility of Artificial Intelligence (as Defined by the Turing Test). Journal of Logic, Language and Information 9 (4):419-424.
    The Turing Test (TT), as originally specified, centres on theability to perform a social role. The TT can be seen as a test of anability to enter into normal human social dynamics. In this light itseems unlikely that such an entity can be wholly designed in an off-line mode; rather a considerable period of training insitu would be required. The argument that since we can pass the TT,and our cognitive processes might be implemented as a Turing Machine(TM), that (...)
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  31.  4
    Romain Laufer (1992). The Social Acceptability of AI Systems: Legitimacy, Epistemology and Marketing. [REVIEW] AI and Society 6 (3):197-220.
    The expression, ‘the culture of the artificial’ results from the confusion between nature and culture, when nature mingles with culture to produce the ‘artificial’ and science becomes ‘the science of the artificial’. Artificial intelligence can thus be defined as the ultimate expression of the crisis affecting the very foundation of the system of legitimacy in Western society, i.e. Reason, and more precisely, Scientific Reason. The discussion focuses on the emergence of the culture of the (...) and the radical forms of pragmatism, sophism and marketing from a French philosophical perspective. The paper suggests that in the postmodern age of the ‘the crisis of the systems of legitimacy’, the question of social acceptability of any action, especially actions arising out of the application of AI, cannot be avoided. (shrink)
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  32.  38
    M. Dascal (1992). Why Does Language Matter to Artificial Intelligence? Minds and Machines 2 (2):145-174.
    Artificial intelligence, conceived either as an attempt to provide models of human cognition or as the development of programs able to perform intelligent tasks, is primarily interested in theuses of language. It should be concerned, therefore, withpragmatics. But its concern with pragmatics should not be restricted to the narrow, traditional conception of pragmatics as the theory of communication (or of the social uses of language). In addition to that, AI should take into account also the mental uses (...)
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  33.  2
    Daniel Estrada, Rethinking Machines: Artificial Intelligence Beyond the Philosophy of Mind.
    Recent philosophy of mind has increasingly focused on the role of technology in shaping, influencing, and extending our mental faculties. Technology extends the mind in two basic ways: through the creative design of artifacts and the purposive use of instruments. If the meaningful activity of technological artifacts were exhaustively described in these mind-dependent terms, then a philosophy of technology would depend entirely on our theory of mind. In this dissertation, I argue that a mind-dependent approach to technology is mistaken. Instead, (...)
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  34.  16
    B. Scott (2013). Some Comments on the Relationship Between Artificial Intelligence and Human Cognition. Constructivist Foundations 9 (1):64-65.
    Open peer commentary on the article “A Computational Constructivist Model as an Anticipatory Learning Mechanism for Coupled Agent–Environment Systems” by Filipo Studzinski Perotto. Upshot: In making a contribution to artificial intelligence research, Perotto has taken note of work on human cognition. However, there are certain aspects of human cognition that are not taken into account by the author’s model and that, generally, are overlooked or ignored by the artificial intelligence research community at large.
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  35. Vincent C. Müller & Nick Bostrom (2016). Future Progress in Artificial Intelligence: A Survey of Expert Opinion. In Fundamental Issues of Artificial Intelligence. Springer 553-571.
    There is, in some quarters, concern about high–level machine intelligence and superintelligent AI coming up in a few decades, bringing with it significant risks for humanity. In other quarters, these issues are ignored or considered science fiction. We wanted to clarify what the distribution of opinions actually is, what probability the best experts currently assign to high–level machine intelligence coming up within a particular time–frame, which risks they see with that development, and how fast they see these developing. (...)
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  36. Vincent C. Müller (2014). Editorial: Risks of General Artificial Intelligence. Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 26 (3):297-301.
    This is the editorial for a special volume of JETAI, featuring papers by Omohundro, Armstrong/Sotala/O’Heigeartaigh, T Goertzel, Brundage, Yampolskiy, B. Goertzel, Potapov/Rodinov, Kornai and Sandberg. - If the general intelligence of artificial systems were to surpass that of humans significantly, this would constitute a significant risk for humanity – so even if we estimate the probability of this event to be fairly low, it is necessary to think about it now. We need to estimate what progress we can (...)
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  37.  5
    Sara M. Bergstresser & Erick Castellanos (2015). Feeding Versus Artificial Nutrition and Hydration: At the Boundaries of Medical Intervention and Social Interaction. Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):204-225.
    In this article, we examine the emergence of a concept of medical feeding that emphasizes artificiality and medical technology. We discuss how this concept has been created in specific contrast to the daily provision of food and water; medical definitions retain clear disjunctures with cultural and religious beliefs surrounding food, gendered aspects of eating and feeding, and the everyday practices of social and family life in the United States. We begin with an examination of the historical processes involved (...)
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  38.  7
    Patrice Caire (2009). Designing Convivial Digital Cities: A Social Intelligence Design Approach. [REVIEW] AI and Society 24 (1):97-114.
    Conviviality has been identified as a key concept necessary to web communities, such as digital cities, and while it has been simultaneously defined in literature as individual freedom realized in personal interdependence, rational and cooperative behavior and normative instrument, no model for conviviality has yet been proposed for computer science. In this article, we raised the question whether social intelligence design could be used to designing convivial digital cities. We first looked at digital cities and identified, from a (...)
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  39.  7
    Richard Hanks (1985). Moral Reasoning in Adolescents: A Feature of Intelligence or Social Adjustment? Journal of Moral Education 14 (1):43-55.
    Abstract This paper summarizes certain aspects of an assessment of the level of the moral judgement of three groups of children: mildly educationally subnormal children, ESN(M), who are also maladjusted; stable ESN(M) children; and stable children of approximately average intelligence. A minimum age of 12.0 years was stipulated; all the children attended secondary school with the oldest in the total sample being 15 years 9 months. The assessment procedure which, although owing much if not all of its rationale (...)
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  40. Stevan Dedijer, Jan Annerstedt & Andrew Jamison (eds.) (1988). From Research Policy to Social Intelligence: Essays for Stevan Dedijer. Macmillan Press.
     
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  41.  32
    Ronald J. Allen (2001). Artificial Intelligence and the Evidentiary Process: The Challenges of Formalism and Computation. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 9 (2-3):99-114.
    The tension between rule and judgment is well known with respect to the meaning of substantive legal commands. The same conflict is present in fact finding. The law penetrates to virtually all aspects of human affairs; irtually any interaction can generate a legal conflict. Accurate fact finding about such disputes is a necessary condition for the appropriate application of substantive legal commands. Without accuracy in fact finding, the law is unpredictable, and thus individuals cannot efficiently accommodate their affairs to (...)
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  42.  37
    Gordana Dodig Crnkovic & Daniel Persson (2008). Sharing Moral Responsibility with Robots: A Pragmatic Approach. In Holst, Per Kreuger & Peter Funk (eds.), Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications Volume 173. IOS Press Books
    Roboethics is a recently developed field of applied ethics which deals with the ethical aspects of technologies such as robots, ambient intelligence, direct neural interfaces and invasive nano-devices and intelligent soft bots. In this article we look specifically at the issue of (moral) responsibility in artificial intelligent systems. We argue for a pragmatic approach, where responsibility is seen as a social regulatory mechanism. We claim that having a system which takes care of certain tasks intelligently, learning (...)
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  43.  55
    Hans F. M. Crombag (1993). On the Artificiality of Artificial Intelligence. Artificial Intelligence and Law 2 (1):39-49.
    In this article the question is raised whether artificial intelligence has any psychological relevance, i.e. contributes to our knowledge of how the mind/brain works. It is argued that the psychological relevance of artificial intelligence of the symbolic kind is questionable as yet, since there is no indication that the brain structurally resembles or operates like a digital computer. However, artificial intelligence of the connectionist kind may have psychological relevance, not because the brain is a (...)
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  44.  6
    Debasis Patnaik (2015). Theorizing Change in Artificial Intelligence: Inductivising Philosophy From Economic Cognition Processes. [REVIEW] AI and Society 30 (2):173-181.
    Economic value additions to knowledge and demand provide practical, embedded and extensible meaning to philosophizing cognitive systems. Evaluation of a cognitive system is an empirical matter. Thinking of science in terms of distributed cognition (interactionism) enlarges the domain of cognition. Anything that actually contributes to the specific quality of output of a cognitive system is part of the system in time and/or space. Cognitive science studies behaviour and knowledge structures of experts and categorized structures based on underlying structures. Knowledge representation (...)
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  45.  17
    Steven James Bartlett, The Case for Government by Artificial Intelligence. Willamette University Faculty Research Website: Http://Www.Willamette.Edu/~Sbartlet/Documents/Bartlett_The%20Case%20for%20Government%20by%20Artifici al%20Intelligence.Pdf.
    THE CASE FOR GOVERNMENT BY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE -/-  Tired of election madness?  The rhetoric of politicians?  Their unreliable promises?  And less than good government? -/- Until recently, it hasn’t been hard for people to give up control to computers. Not very many people miss the effort and time required to do calculations by hand, to keep track of their finances, or to complete their tax returns manually. But relinquishing direct human control to self-driving cars (...)
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  46.  16
    Don Sherratt, Simon Rogerson & N. Ben Fairweather (2005). The Challenge of Raising Ethical Awareness: A Case-Based Aiding System for Use by Computing and ICT Students. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (2):299-315.
    Students, the future Information and Communication Technology (ICT) professionals, are often perceived to have little understanding of the ethical issues associated with the use of ICTs. There is a growing recognition that the moral issues associated with the use of the new technologies should be brought to the attention of students. Furthermore, they should be encouraged to explore and think more deeply about the social and legal consequences of the use of ICTs. This paper describes the development of a (...)
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  47.  86
    Vincent C. Müller (2011). Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence, 3–4 October (Report on PT-AI 2011). The Reasoner 5 (11):192-193.
    Report for "The Reasoner" on the conference "Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence", 3 & 4 October 2011, Thessaloniki, Anatolia College/ACT, http://www.pt-ai.org. --- Organization: Vincent C. Müller, Professor of Philosophy at ACT & James Martin Fellow, Oxford http://www.sophia.de --- Sponsors: EUCogII, Oxford-FutureTech, AAAI, ACM-SIGART, IACAP, ECCAI.
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  48.  8
    Yanna Vogiazou (2007). Design for Emergence: Collaborative Social Play with Online and Location-Based Media. Ios Press.
    In light of the fact that social dynamics and unexpected uses of technology can inspire innovation, this book proposes a research model of design for emergence, ...
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  49.  74
    Jerold J. Abrams (2004). Pragmatism, Artificial Intelligence, and Posthuman Bioethics: Shusterman, Rorty, Foucault. [REVIEW] Human Studies 27 (3):241-258.
    Michel Foucault's early works criticize the development of modern democratic institutions as creating a surveillance society, which functions to control bodies by making them feel watched and monitored full time. His later works attempt to recover private space by exploring subversive techniques of the body and language. Following Foucault, pragmatists like Richard Shusterman and Richard Rorty have also developed very rich approaches to this project, extending it deeper into the literary and somatic dimensions of self-stylizing. Yet, for a debate centered (...)
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  50. Viola Schiaffonati (2003). A Framework for the Foundation of the Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence. Minds and Machines 13 (4):537-552.
    The peculiarity of the relationship between philosophy and Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been evidenced since the advent of AI. This paper aims to put the basis of an extended and well founded philosophy of AI: it delineates a multi-layered general framework to which different contributions in the field may be traced back. The core point is to underline how in the same scenario both the role of philosophy on AI and role of AI on philosophy must be considered. (...)
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