Search results for 'Arts Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  2
    P. C. (1904). The Congresses of Arts and Sciences at St. Louis. The Monist 14 (5):779 - 783.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. James Donald (ed.) (1991). Psychoanalysis and Cultural Theory: Thresholds. St. Martin's Press.
  3.  5
    James A. Leith & George Whalley (eds.) (1987). Symbols in Life and Art: The Royal Society of Canada Symposium in Memory of George Whalley. Published for the Royal Society of Canada by Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 10 sider ad gangen og max. 40 sider pr. session.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. E. P. Bos & H. A. Krop (eds.) (1993). John Buridan, a Master of Arts: Some Aspects of His Philosophy: Acts of the Second Symposium Organized by the Dutch Society for Medieval Philosophy Medium Aevum on the Occasion of its 15th Anniversary, Leiden-Amsterdam (Vrije Universiteit), 20-21 June, 1991. [REVIEW] Ingenium Publishers.
  5. Paul Hallberg (ed.) (1979). The Condition of Man: Proceedings of an International Symposium Held September 8-10, 1978 in Göteborg to Celebrate the 200th Anniversary of the Royal Society of Arts and Sciences of Göteborg. [REVIEW] Vetenskaps- O. Vitterhets-Samhället.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. J. M. E. Moravcsik & Philip Temko (eds.) (1982). Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts. Rowman and Littlefield.
  7. Floyd Ratliff (ed.) (1985). The Visual Arts and Sciences: A Symposium Held at the American Philosophical Society. The Society.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  18
    Anton Killin (2013). The Arts and Human Nature: Evolutionary Aesthetics and the Evolutionary Status of Art Behaviours. Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):703-718.
    This essay reviews one of the most recent books in a trend of new publications proffering evolutionary theorising about aesthetics and the arts—themes within an increasing literature on aspects of human life and human nature in terms of evolutionary theory. Stephen Davies’ The Artful Species links some of our aesthetic sensibilities with our evolved human nature and critically surveys the interdisciplinary debate regarding the evolutionary status of the arts. Davies’ engaging and accessible writing succeeds in demonstrating the maturity (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  9.  66
    Ronald Bogue (2003). Deleuze on Music, Painting, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Bogue provides a systematic overview and introduction to Deleuze's writings on music and painting, and an assessment of their position within his aesthetics as a whole. Deleuze on Music, Painting and the Arts breaks new ground in the scholarship on Deleuze's aesthetics, while providing a clear and accessible guide to his often overlooked writings in the fields of music and painting.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  10. Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2003). Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of sustained, critical attention it deserves. Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts represents the work of fifteen young yet distinguished philosophers of art, who critically examine just how and in what form the notion of imagination illuminates fundamental problems in the philosophy of art. All new papers, a strong collection on the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  11.  48
    David Davies (2011). Philosophy of the Performing Arts. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This book provides an accessible yet sophisticated introduction to the significant philosophical issues concerning the performing arts.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  23
    Lance Moir & Richard Taffler (2004). Does Corporate Philanthropy Exist?: Business Giving to the Arts in the U.K. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):149 - 161.
    This paper addresses the question of the existence of corporate philanthropy. It proposes a framework for analysing corporate philanthropy along the dimensions of business/society interest and primary/secondary stakeholder focus. The framework is then applied in order to understand business involvement with the arts in the U.K. A unique dataset of 60 texts which describe different firms' involvement with the Arts is analysed using formal content analysis to uncover the motivations for business involvement. Cluster analysis is then used in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  13.  20
    Peter Kivy (1997). Philosophies of Arts: An Essay in Differences. Cambridge University Press.
    Since the beginning of the eighteenth century the philosophy of art has been engaged on the project of trying to find out what the fine arts have in common and, thus, how they might be defined. Peter Kivy's purpose in this accessible and lucid book is to trace the history of that enterprise and argue that the definitional project has been unsuccessful. He offers a fruitful change of strategy: instead of engaging in an obsessive quest for sameness, let us (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  14.  21
    Jakub Ryszard Matyja (2015). Philosophy of the Performing Arts. A Book Review. [REVIEW] Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies (3):164-166.
    A book review of 'Philosophy of the Performing Arts'.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  18
    Darryl Reed (2004). Universities and the Promotion of Corporate Responsibility: Reinterpreting the Liberal Arts Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (1):3-41.
    The issue of corporate responsibility has long been discussed in relationship to universities, but generally only in an ad hoc fashion. While the role of universities in teaching business ethics is one theme that has received significant and rather constant attention, other issues tend to be raised only sporadically. Moreover, when issues of corporate responsibility are raised, it is often done on the presumption of some understanding of a liberal arts mandate of the university, a position that has come (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16.  7
    Chozan Niwa (2006). The Demon's Sermon on the Martial Arts and Other Tales. Kodansha International.
    The Demon said to the swordsman, "Fundamentally, man's mind is not without good. It is simply that from the moment he has life, he is always being brought up with perversity. Thus, having no idea that he has gotten used to being soaked in it, he harms his self-nature and falls into evil. Human desire is the root of this perversity." Woven deeply into the martial traditions and folklore of Japan, the fearsome Tengu dwell in the country's mountain forest. Mythical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  20
    Barry Allen (2014). Daoism and Chinese Martial Arts. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):251-266.
    The now-global phenomenon of Asian martial arts traces back to something that began in China. The idea the Chinese communicated was the dual cultivation of the spiritual and the martial, each perfected in the other, with the proof of perfection being an effortless mastery of violence. I look at one phase of the interaction between Asian martial arts and Chinese thought, with a reading of the Zhuangzi 莊子 and the Daodejing 道德經 from a martial arts perspective. I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Sylvia Burrow (2014). Martial Arts and Moral Life. In Graham Priest Damon Young (ed.), Martial Arts and Philosophy: Engagement. Routledge
    A key point of feminist moral philosophy is that social and political conditions continue to work against women’s ability to flourish as moral agents. By pointing to how violence against women undermines both autonomy and integrity I uncover a significant means through which women are undermined in society. My focus is on violence against women as a pervasive, inescapable social condition that women can counter through self-defence training.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  16
    Patrick Maynard (2012). Arts, Agents, Artifacts: Photography's Automatisms. Critical Inquiry 38 (4):727-745.
    Recent advances in paleoarchaeology show why nothing in the Tate Modern, where a conference on "Agency & Automatism" took place, challenges the roots of 'the idea of the fine arts' (Kristeller) as high levels of craft, aesthetics, mimesis and mental expression, as exemplifying cultures: it is by them that we define our species. This paper identifies and deals with resistances, early and late, to photographic fine art as based on concerns about automatism reducing human agency--that is, mental expression--then offers (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  24
    Caroline van Eck, James McAllister & Renée van de Vall (eds.) (1995). The Question of Style in Philosophy and the Arts. Cambridge University Press.
    The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries witnessed a change in the perception of the arts and of philosophy. In the arts this transition occurred around 1800, with, for instance, the breakdown of Vitruvianism in architecture, while in philosophy the foundationalism of which Descartes and Spinoza were paradigmatic representatives, which presumed that philosophy and the sciences possessed a method of ensuring the demonstration of truths, was undermined by the idea, asserted by Nietzsche and Wittgenstein, that there exist alternative styles of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  21
    Thomas E. Peterson (2010). Badiou, Pedagogy and the Arts. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (2):159-176.
    The essay distils from Badiou's writing a pedagogy based on his theories of knowledge and truth, as brought to bear on poetry and the arts. By following Badiou's implicit ontology of learning, which presupposes a dynamic and passionate engagement with a concrete situation, the essay argues that Badiou's view of modernity, in particular, contributes greatly to the educational topic, and offers an alternative teaching paradigm to the outmoded schools of criticism of the 20 th century. It also argues that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  3
    Terry Quinn (2012). Invitation to Functional Collaboration: Dynamics of Progress in the Sciences, Technologies, and Arts. Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 7:94-122.
    In all disciplines there is the question of how to promote progress and offset decline. But, what are progress and decline ? For this short article, the main discussion centers on biology. A solution called functional specialization begins to emerge as relevant to all of the sciences, technologies and arts. This introductory article ends with some heuristics on various follow-up issues.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Alexander Broadie (ed.) (2004). Thomas Reid on Logic, Rhetoric and the Fine Arts: Papers on the Culture of the Mind. Penn State University Press.
    Thomas Reid saw the three subjects of logic, rhetoric, and the fine arts as closely cohering aspects of one endeavor that he called the culture of the mind. This was a topic on which Reid lectured for many years in Glasgow, and this volume presents as near a reconstruction of these lectures as is now possible. Though virtually unknown today, this material in fact relates closely to Reid’s published works and in particular to the late _Essays on the Intellectual (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Susan L. Feagin (ed.) (2007). Global Theories of the Arts and Aesthetics. Blackwell.
    This collection of papers focuses on theories and practices in relation to the arts around the globe, in particular, those that have been ignored or marginalized by analytic or Anglo-American aesthetics and philosophy of art. The intention is to explain specific ways that the concepts of the aesthetic and of the arts might be enriched and enhanced. Indeed, in some cases the participation in artistic practices and the experience of art are deeply embedded in one’ s sense of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  12
    Salim Kemal & Ivan Gaskell (eds.) (1993). Explanation and Value in the Arts. Cambridge University Press.
    Explanation and Value in the Arts offers penetrating studies by art historians, literary theorists, and philosophers, of issues central to explaining works of literature and painting. The first chapters look at the sources of interest in the fine arts and point to the intimate relation between aesthetic and other values. The next contributions develop the interaction between value and explanation in the study of the arts, including considerations of the nature of creativity and the principles for the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  17
    Salim Kemal & Ivan Gaskell (eds.) (2000). Politics and Aesthetics in the Arts. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume brings together new essays from distinguished scholars in a variety of disciplines - philosophy, history, literary studies, art history - to explore various ways in which aesthetics, politics and the arts interact with one another. Politics is an elastic concept, covering an oceanic breadth of mechanisms for conducting relations between empowered groups, and these essays offer a range of perspectives, including nations, classes, and gendered subjects, which examine the imbrication of politics with arts. Together they demonstrate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Trevor Pateman (1991). Key Concepts a Guide to Aesthetics, Criticism, and the Arts in Education. Falmer Press.
    First published in 1991. The arts can only thrive in a culture where there is conversation about them. This is particularly true of the arts in an education context. Yet often the discussion is poor because we do not have the necessary concepts for the elaboration of our aesthetic responses, or sufficient familiarity with the contending schools of interpretation. The aim of _Key Concepts _is to engender a broad and informed conversation about the arts. By means of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  18
    S. Brent Plate (2005). Walter Benjamin, Religion, and Aesthetics: Rethinking Religion Through the Arts. Routledge.
    Walter Benjamin, Religion, and Aesthetics is an innovative attempt to reconceive the key concepts of religious studies through a reading with, and against, Walter Benjamin. Brent Plate deftly sifts through Benjamin's voluminous writings showing how his concepts of art, allegory, and experience undo traditional religious concepts such as myth, symbol, memory, narrative, creation, and redemption. Recasting religion as religious practice, as process and movement, Plate locates a Benjaminian materialist aesthetics, what the author calls an "allegorical aesthetics," in order to uncover (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  17
    Benjamin Rutter (2010). Hegel on the Modern Arts. Cambridge University Press.
    Debates over the 'end of art' have tended to obscure Hegel's work on the arts themselves. Benjamin Rutter opens this study with a defence of art's indispensability to Hegel's conception of modernity; he then seeks to reorient discussion toward the distinctive values of painting, poetry, and the novel. Working carefully through Hegel's four lecture series on aesthetics, he identifies the expressive possibilities particular to each medium. Thus, Dutch genre scenes animate the everyday with an appearance of vitality; metaphor frees (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Hugh J. Silverman (ed.) (1990). Postmodernism: Philosophy and the Arts. Routledge.
    The essays collected here present a cross section of the debates on postmodernism being waged in philosophy and the arts. Some contributors raise general questions about postmodernism, for example, its language and its politics. Others offer specific readings of architecture, painting, literature, theatre, photography, film, and television.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Dennis J. Sporre (2011). Perceiving the Arts: An Introduction to the Humanities. Pearson.
    Introduction. What are the arts and how do we respond to and evaluate them? -- Pictures : drawing, painting, printmaking, and photography -- Sculpture -- Architecture -- Music -- Literature -- Theatre -- Cinema -- Dance.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & Fine Arts Aesthetics American Society for Phenomenology (2000). The Aesthetic Discourse of the Arts Breaking the Barriers. Kluwer Academic.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  7
    Nina Zaragoza (2002). Rethinking Language Arts: Passion and Practice. Routledgefalmer.
    In Rethinking Language Arts: Passion and Practice, Second Edition , author Nina Zaragoza uses the form of letters to her students to engage pre-service teachers in reevaluating teaching practices. Zaragoza discusses and explains the need for teachers to be decision-makers, reflective thinkers, political beings, and agents of social change in order to create a positive and inclusive classroom setting. This book is both a critical text that deconstructs the way language arts are traditionally taught in our schools as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Joshua A. Miller & Daniel Harold Levine (2015). Reprobation as Shared Inquiry: Teaching the Liberal Arts in Prison. Radical Philosophy Review 18 (2).
    Respect for victims requires that we have social systems for punishing and condemning (reproving) serious crimes. But, the conditions of social marginalization and political subordination of the communities from which an overwhelming number of prisoners in the United States come place serious barriers in the face of effective reprobation. Mass incarceration makes this problem worse by disrupting and disrespecting entire communities. While humanities education in the prisons is far from a total solution, it is one way to make reprobation meaningful, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  12
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2006). Multiple Arts: The Muses II. Stanford University Press.
    This collection of writings by Jean-Luc Nancy, the renowned French critic and poet, delves into the history of philosophy to locate a fundamentally poetic modus operandi there. The book represents a daring mixture of Nancy’s philosophical essays, writings about artworks, and artwork of his own. With theoretical rigor, Nancy elaborates on the intrinsic multiplicity of art as a concept of “making,” and outlines the tensions inherent in the faire, the “making” that characterizes the very process of production and thereby the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  36. Horace Meyer Kallen (1943). The Arts and Thomas Jefferson. Ethics 53 (4):269-283.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  6
    David Best (1985). Feeling and Reason in the Arts. Allen & Unwin.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  38.  21
    Paul Thom (1993). For an Audience: A Philosophy of the Performing Arts. Temple University Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  39.  16
    Kathryn Vaughn & Ellen Winner (2000). SAT Scores of Students Who Study the Arts: What We Can and Cannot Conclude About the Association. Journal of Aesthetic Education 34 (3/4):77-90.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40. Arnold Berleant (2005). Re-Thinking Aesthetics Rogue Essays on Aesthetics and the Arts. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41. Thomas Reid (2005). Thomas Reid on Logic, Rhetoric, and the Fine Arts: Papers on the Culture of the Mind. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  42. Gillian Russell (forthcoming). Epistemic Viciousness in the Martial Arts. In Graham Priest & Damon Young (eds.), Martial Arts and Philosophy. Open Court
    When I was eleven, my form teacher, Mr Howard, showed some of my class how to punch. We were waiting for the rest of the class to finish changing after gym, and he took a stance that I would now call shizentai yoi and snapped his right fist forward into a head-level straight punch, pulling his left back to his side at the same time. Then he punched with his left, pulling back on his right. We all lined up in (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  4
    William Cooney (1999). The Quest for Meaning: A Journey Through Philosophy, the Arts, and Creative Genius. Upa.
    The Quest for Meaning explores the deep-seated human need to create a life that is meaningful. In an effort to understand this need, author William Cooney examines the works of philosophers from Plato to Sartre as well as the insights of artists, poets, writers, psychologists, and film-makers. He discusses the nature of humanness, creation, freedom, and choice, all of which are facets of a meaningful life. Cooney also addresses postmodernism, arguing that it does not offer real guidance for those seeking (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44. John Arthur Passmore (1991). Serious Art a Study of the Concept in All the Major Arts.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45. Herman Kauz (1977). The Martial Spirit: An Introduction to the Origin, Philosophy, and Psychology of the Martial Arts. Overlook Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  5
    Kirsty Johnston (2010). Grafting Orchids and Ugly: Theatre, Disability and Arts-Based Health Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (4):279-294.
    Theatre-based health policy research is an emerging field, and this article investigates the work of one of its leaders. In 2005, prominent medical geneticist and playwright Jeff Nisker and his collaborators produced Orchids, his play concerning pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, to research theatre as a tool for engaging citizens in health policy development. Juxtaposing Orchids with a concurrent disability theatre production in Vancouver entitled Ugly, I argue that disability theatre suggests important means for building inclusiveness in this kind of research and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  5
    Deborah Seltzer-Kelly, Sean J. Westwood & David M. Peña-Guzman (2010). Deweyan Multicultural Democracy, Rortian Solidarity, and the Popular Arts: Krumping Into Presence. Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (5):441-457.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  2
    Jay Appleton (1992). The Symbolism of Habitat: An Interpretation of Landscape in the Arts. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (1):79-80.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    Charles Ess (2003). Liberal Arts and Distance Education: Can Socratic Virtue and Confucius’ Exemplary Person Be Taught Online? Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 2 (2):117-137.
    The goals of a global liberal arts education, as conjoining both western and eastern sources, focus on ‘virtue first’, i.e. on pursuing human excellence . To determine whether such excellence can be taught online, I turn to contemporary research on Computer-Mediated Communication and online education. Among other factors, important cultural issues as well as the real costs of online education have moderated 1990s enthusiasm for online learning as ‘revolutionary’. I then take up Hubert Dreyfus’ pedagogical taxonomy as it emphasizes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  2
    Etienne Gilson (1965/2000). The Arts of the Beautiful. Dalkey Archive Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000