Search results for 'Arts Research' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kirsty Johnston (2010). Grafting Orchids and Ugly: Theatre, Disability and Arts-Based Health Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (4):279-294.score: 63.0
    Theatre-based health policy research is an emerging field, and this article investigates the work of one of its leaders. In 2005, prominent medical geneticist and playwright Jeff Nisker and his collaborators produced Orchids, his play concerning pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, to research theatre as a tool for engaging citizens in health policy development. Juxtaposing Orchids with a concurrent disability theatre production in Vancouver entitled Ugly, I argue that disability theatre suggests important means for building inclusiveness in this kind of (...)
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  2. Lynn Butler-Kisber & Tiiu Poldma (2011). The Power of Visual Approaches in Qualitative Inquiry: The Use of Collage Making and Concept Mapping in Experiential Research. Journal of Research Practice 6 (2):Article M18.score: 48.0
    The burgeoning interest in arts-informed research and the increasing variety of visual possibilities as a result of new technologies have paved the way for researchers to explore and use visual forms of inquiry. This article investigates how collage making and concept mapping are useful visual approaches that can inform qualitative research. They are experiential ways of doing/knowing that help to get at tacit aspects of both understanding and process and to make these more explicit to the researcher (...)
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  3. P. Scher (2000). Research and Evaluation of the Exeter Health Care Arts Project. Medical Humanities 26 (2):71-78.score: 48.0
    An arts project was initiated at the newly rebuilt district hospital in the city of Exeter in south west England. This paper describes an independent research evaluation project covering the period from its inception in 1992. The findings include both qualitative and economic aspects and were compared with the authors' wider experience of similar projects. For the first time the responses of clinical staff about the effects of art on the healing process, on therapeutic benefit and on morale (...)
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  4. Tom Barone (2008). How Arts-Based Research Can Change Minds. In Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.), Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge.score: 48.0
     
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  5. Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor (2008). Arts-Based Research : Histories and New Directions. In Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.), Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge.score: 48.0
     
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  6. Elliot Eisner (2008). Persistent Tensions in Arts-Based Research. In Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.), Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge.score: 48.0
     
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  7. Richard Siegesmund & Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor (2008). The Tensions of Arts-Based Research in Education Reconsidered : The Promise for Practice. In Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.), Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge.score: 48.0
     
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  8. Courtney Kosky (2008). An Action Research Exploration Integrating Student Choice and Arts Activities in a Sixth. Journal of Social Studies Research 32:1.score: 39.0
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  9. Juha Varto (2009). Basics of Artistic Research: Ontological, Epistemological and Historical Justifications. University of Art and Design Helsinki.score: 39.0
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  10. David H. Wright (forthcoming). Style in the Visual Arts as Material for Social Research. Social Research.score: 39.0
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  11. Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.) (2008). Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge.score: 38.0
  12. Elena Esposito (2010). P. Oxy. LXXI (R.) Hatzilambrou, (P.J.) Parsons, (J.) Chapa (Edd., Trans.) [Et Al.] The Oxyrhynchus Papyri. Volume LXXI. (Graeco-Roman Memoirs 91.) Pp. Xii + 164, Colour Pls. London: Egypt Exploration Society for The Arts and Humanities Research Council, 2007. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-0-85698-174-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (01):285-.score: 36.0
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  13. Lon Dubinsky & W. F. Garrett-Petts (2002). 'Working Well, Together': Arts-Based Research and the Cultural Future of Small Cities. [REVIEW] AI and Society 16 (4):332-349.score: 36.0
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  14. D. Kirklin (2003). Editorial: Medical Students and Arts and Humanities Research--Fostering Creativity, Inquisitiveness, and Lateral Thinking. Medical Humanities 29 (2):103-103.score: 36.0
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  15. Peter Goldie (2010). ALLAN, DEREK. Art and the Human Adventure: Andre Malreaux's Theory of Art.(Amsterdam: Rodopi). 2009. Pp. 342.£ 64.60 (Pbk). BARRETT, ESTELLE and BOLT, BARBARA (Eds). Practice as Research: Approaches to Creative Arts Enquiry.(London: IB Tauris). 2010. Pp. 224.£ 17.99 (Pbk). [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (2):223.score: 36.0
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  16. Morwenna Griffiths, Judy Berry, Anne Holt, John Naylor & Philippa Weekes (2006). Learning to Be in Public Spaces: In From the Margins with Dancers, Sculptors, Painters and Musicians. British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (3):352 - 371.score: 36.0
    This article reports research in three Nottingham schools, concerned with (1) 'The school as fertile ground: how the ethos of a school enables everyone in it to benefit from the presence of artists in class'; (2) 'Children on the edge: how the arts reach those children who otherwise exclude themselves from class activities, for any reason' and (3) 'Children's voices and choices: how even very young children can learn to express their wishes, and then have them realised through (...)
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  17. Leslie Tomory (2013). Science and the Arts in William Henry's Research Into Inflammable Air During the Early Nineteenth Century. Annals of Science 71 (1):1-21.score: 36.0
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  18. Claudio de Stefani (2011). P. Oxy. LXXIV (D.) Leith, (D.C.) Parker, (S.R.) Pickering, (N.) Gonis, (M.) Malouta [Et Al.] (Edd., Trans.) The Oxyrhynchus Papyri. Volume LXXIV. (Graeco-Roman Memoirs 95.) Pp. Xii + 174, Pls. London: Egypt Exploration Society with The Arts and Humanities Research Council and The British Academy, 2009. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-0-85698-183-8. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):435-437.score: 36.0
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  19. David Pariser (forthcoming). Not Under the Lamppost: Piagetian and Neo-Piagetian Research in the Arts. A Review and Critique. Journal of Aesthetic Education.score: 36.0
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  20. H. U. Jun (2011). A" Physical" Research Approach to Fine Arts Education History: On Diana Korzenik's Fine Arts Education Practice. Journal of Aesthetic Education 2:010.score: 36.0
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  21. Seymour Roworth-Stokes (2013). The Business of Research in Art and Design: Parallels Between Research Centres and Small Businesses. Journal of Research Practice 9 (1):Article M3.score: 33.0
    This article provides a cross-case analysis of four art and design research centres operating within UK universities. Findings from autobiographical and semi-structured interviews with researchers, research managers, and research leaders indicate that they encounter similar issues in trying to establish internal legitimacy within the university alongside the need to gain external support and recognition. In dealing with these challenges, art and design research centres tend to pass through four broadly identifiable phases: (i) Origination (utilising credentials and (...)
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  22. Dino Alfier (2011). Critical Practical Analogy: A Research Tool for Reflecting and Making. Journal of Research Practice 7 (1):Article P3.score: 30.0
    What contribution can visual art practice bring to interdisciplinary research? And how to give an account of practice-led research that acknowledges the need for interdisciplinary intelligibility? I consider these two questions by reflecting on the methodology--which I call "critical practical analogy" (CPA)--that I have developed while investigating the metaethical implications of French philosopher Simone Weil's notion of attention, during my practice-led PhD. In order to address the first question, I consider as a case study a research art (...)
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  23. Janez Strehovec (2009). New Media Art as Research: Art-Making Beyond the Autonomy of Art and Aesthetics. Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research 6 (3):233-250.score: 30.0
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  24. Maarit Mäkelä, Nithikul Nimkulrat, D. P. Dash & Francois-X. Nsenga (2011). On Reflecting and Making in Artistic Research. Journal of Research Practice 7 (1):Article E1.score: 30.0
    Following the integration of artistic disciplines within the university, artists have been challenged to review their practice in academic terms. This has become a vigorous epicentre of debates concerning the nature of research in the artistic disciplines. The special issue "On Reflecting and Making in Artistic Research Practice" captures some of this debate. This editorial article presents a broad-brush outline of the debates raging in the artistic disciplines and presents three discernible trends in those debates. The trends highlight (...)
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  25. Nithikul Nimkulrat (2007). The Role of Documentation in Practice-Led Research. Journal of Research Practice 3 (1):Article M6.score: 30.0
    Practice-led research in the field of art and design usually involves a study of the interplay between a researcher-practitioner and her artistic work in process. This article seeks to illustrate that documentation of art practice can be a means to record that interplay and it can be used as relevant material in practice-led research. The article will present an account of documentation in practice-led research highlighting two principal aspects: phases of documentation and the role of documentation within (...)
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  26. Tim O'Riley (2011). A Discrete Continuity: On the Relation Between Research and Art Practice. Journal of Research Practice 7 (1):Article P1.score: 29.0
    This short article discusses the nature of research and art practice and makes a case for the necessary intermingling of these activities. It does not attempt to define a space for art to operate as research, quite the opposite: research is an operating structure for the process and production of, among other things, art. It is regarded as integral to the processes of thinking, making, and reflecting, and it is important to note that curiosity, creative enquiry, and (...)
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  27. Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2003). Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.score: 27.0
    Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of sustained, critical attention it deserves. Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts represents the work of fifteen young yet distinguished philosophers of art, who critically examine just how and in what form the notion of imagination illuminates fundamental problems in the philosophy of art. All new papers, a strong collection on the (...)
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  28. Darryl Reed (2004). Universities and the Promotion of Corporate Responsibility: Reinterpreting the Liberal Arts Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (1):3-41.score: 27.0
    The issue of corporate responsibility has long been discussed in relationship to universities, but generally only in an ad hoc fashion. While the role of universities in teaching business ethics is one theme that has received significant and rather constant attention, other issues tend to be raised only sporadically. Moreover, when issues of corporate responsibility are raised, it is often done on the presumption of some understanding of a liberal arts mandate of the university, a position that has come (...)
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  29. Lance Moir & Richard Taffler (2004). Does Corporate Philanthropy Exist?: Business Giving to the Arts in the U.K. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):149 - 161.score: 27.0
    This paper addresses the question of the existence of corporate philanthropy. It proposes a framework for analysing corporate philanthropy along the dimensions of business/society interest and primary/secondary stakeholder focus. The framework is then applied in order to understand business involvement with the arts in the U.K. A unique dataset of 60 texts which describe different firms' involvement with the Arts is analysed using formal content analysis to uncover the motivations for business involvement. Cluster analysis is then used in (...)
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  30. Kristina Niedderer & Linden Reilly (2011). Research Practice in Art and Design: Experiential Knowledge and Organised Inquiry. Journal of Research Practice 6 (2):Article E2.score: 27.0
    Experiential knowledge is not often associated with research and organized inquiry, and even less often with the rigour of debating and honing research methods and methodology. However, many researchers in art and design and related fields perceive experiential knowledge or tacit knowledge as an integral part of their practice. The editorial article for the special issue on "Research Practice in Art and Design: Experiential Knowledge and Organised Inquiry" explores how research can recognise the relationship between creative (...)
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  31. Anna Alichniewicz & Monika Michalowska (forthcoming). “The Angel of the House” in the Realm of ART: Feminist Approach to Oocyte and Spare Embryo Donation for Research. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-7.score: 27.0
    The spectacular progress in assisted reproduction technology that has been witnessed for the past thirty years resulted in emerging new ethical dilemmas as well as the revision of some perennial ones. The paper aims at a feminist approach to oocyte and spare embryo donation for research. First, referring to different concepts of autonomy and informed consent, we discuss whether the decision to donate oocyte/embryo can truly be an autonomous choice of a female patient. Secondly, we argue the commonly adopted (...)
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  32. Anne R. Richards (2008). The Art of Rhetoric as Self-Discipline: Interdisciplinarity, Inner Necessity, and the Construction of a Research Agenda. Journal of Research Practice 4 (1):Article M2.score: 27.0
    I explore in this essay an ethically grounded method for structuring a program of study. Rather than attempt to delimit a discipline or to reinforce disciplinarity, I suggest a means of creatively narrowing the scope of research, namely by focusing on inner necessity and conscience. The art of rhetoric as self-discipline is an extension of inner necessity and a framework in which scholars may come to integrate the more rational and more artistic, more public and more private elements of (...)
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  33. Jackie Scully, Erica Haimes, Anika Mitzkat, Rouven Porz & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter (2012). Donating Embryos to Stem Cell Research. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):19-28.score: 24.0
    This paper is based on linked qualitative studies of the donation of human embryos to stem cell research carried out in the United Kingdom, Switzerland, and China. All three studies used semi-structured interview protocols to allow an in-depth examination of donors’ and non-donors’ rationales for their donation decisions, with the aim of gaining information on contextual and other factors that play a role in donor decisions and identifying how these relate to factors that are more usually included in evaluations (...)
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  34. Lora T. Likova Christopher W. Tyler (2012). The Role of the Visual Arts in Enhancing the Learning Process. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 23.0
    Inspiration is an important aspect of the artistic experience, both for the artist and for the viewer of the work. Inspiration involves not only higher cortical circuitry but its integration with the deep brain structures such as limbic system and medial frontal structures, which are understood to mediate the experience of emotions, motivational rewards and the appreciation of the aesthetic values of the impinging stimuli. In this sense, inspiration can turn almost any occupation in life into an avocation, a source (...)
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  35. Louise Ammentorp (2007). Imagining Social Change: Developing Social Consciousness in an Arts-Based Pedagogy. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 9 (1):38-52.score: 23.0
    This paper is a study of a social-justice, arts-based literacy curriculum in a low income, working-class, predominately African-American school district in Newark, New Jersey. Participating students studied photography and poetry of established artists and took and developed their own photographs accompanied by written narratives. As a part of the curriculum students also wrote poetry and analytical essays. I present my findings within the context of a Vygotskian pedagogical approach that takes social consciousness and metaphor as its central concepts. The (...)
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  36. Estelle Barrett & Barbara Bolt (eds.) (2013). Carnal Knowledge: Towards a 'New Materialism' Through the Arts. I.B. Tauris.score: 23.0
    Carnal Knowledge is an outcome of the renewed energy and interest in moving beyond the discursive construction of reality to understand the relationship between what is conceived of as reality and materiality, described as the "material turn." It draws together established and emerging writers, whose research spans dance, music, film, fashion, design, photography, literature, painting and stereo-immersive VR, to demonstrate how art allows us to map the complex relations between nature and culture, between the body, language and knowledge. These (...)
     
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  37. Noël Carroll (2009). Les Culs-de-Sac of Enlightenment Aesthetics: A Metaphilosophy of Art. Metaphilosophy 40 (2):157-178.score: 21.0
    Abstract: This article charts the rise and fall of the Modern System of the Arts and the failure of the aesthetic theory of art to define membership in the so-called system, which, instead, I argue, is and has been, for a long time, merely a historically evolved collection. Rather than endorsing the continued attempt to define Art with a capital A in terms of aesthetic experience, I recommend alternative lines of research for contemporary philosophers of the arts.
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  38. Eric Schwitzgebel (1999). Representation and Desire: A Philosophical Error with Consequences for Theory-of-Mind Research. Philosophical Psychology 12 (2):157-180.score: 21.0
    This paper distinguishes two conceptions of representation at work in the philosophical literature. On the first, "contentive" conception (found, for example, in Searle and Fodor), something is a representation, roughly, if it has "propositional content". On the second, "indicative" conception (found, for example, in Dretske), representations must not only have content but also have the function of indicating something about the world. Desire is representational on the first view but not on the second. This paper argues that philosophers and psychologists (...)
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  39. Janet Borgerson (2005). Addressing the 'Global Basic Structure' in the Ethics of International Health Research Involving Human Subjects. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:235-249.score: 21.0
    The context of international health research involving human subjects, and this should appear obvious, is the human community. As such, basic questions of how human beings should be treated by other human beings, particularly in situations of unequal power – e.g., in the form of control, choice, or opportunity – lay at the foundations of related ethical discourse when ethics are discussed at all. I trace a narrative that follows upon a recent revision process of international guidelines for biomedical (...)
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  40. Greg Bamford (2003). Research, Knowledge and Design. In Clare Newton, Sandra Kaj-O'Grady & Simon Wollan (eds.), Design + Research: Project Based Research in Architecture. Second International Conference of the Association of Australasian Schools of Architecture, Melbourne 28 – 30 September, 2003. Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia.score: 21.0
    The discussion about relations between research and design has a number of strands, and presumably motivations. Putting aside the question whether or not design or “creative endeavour” should be counted as research, for reasons to do with institutional recognition or reward, the question remains how, if at all, is design research? This question is unlikely to have attracted much interest but for matters external to Architecture within the modern university. But Architecture as a discipline now needs to (...)
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  41. David R. Morrow, Robert E. Kopp & Michael Oppenheimer (2009). Toward Ethical Norms and Institutions for Climate Engineering Research. Environmental Research Letters 4.score: 21.0
    Climate engineering (CE), the intentional modification of the climate in order to reduce the effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, is sometimes touted as a potential response to climate change. Increasing interest in the topic has led to proposals for empirical tests of hypothesized CE techniques, which raise serious ethical concerns. We propose three ethical guidelines for CE researchers, derived from the ethics literature on research with human and animal subjects, applicable in the event that CE research progresses (...)
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  42. Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.) (2010). The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    The art, craft, and science of policing -- Crime and criminals -- Criminal process and prosecution -- The crime-preventive impact of penal sanctions -- Contracts and corporations -- Financial markets -- Consumer protection -- Bankruptcy and insolvency -- Regulating the professions -- Personal injury litigation -- Claiming behavior as legal mobilization -- Families -- Labor and employment laws -- Housing and property -- Human rights instruments -- Constitutions -- Social security and social welfare -- Occupational safety and health -- Environmental (...)
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  43. Anna Chesnokova (2010). Muses and Measures: Empirical Research Methods for the Humanities (Review). Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (4):120-121.score: 21.0
    Sometimes one book is enough to change the whole way of thinking or general attitude of students, and this is the case with Muses and Measures: Empirical Research Methods for the Humanities. Now that empirical research methods are getting their due recognition in the spheres of Literature, Arts, and other media, the volume is really welcome. It is a practice-oriented book to help students and tutors either to get acquainted with methodology that is still new to them (...)
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  44. Richard A. Smith & John R. Leach (2010). Liberal Arts Education and Brain Plasticity. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (2):119-130.score: 21.0
    This paper addresses what some view as a progressive and decades-long devaluing of the liberal arts in our educational institutions and society at large. It draws attention to symptoms of this trend and possible contributing factors, identifies benefits commonly attributed to the liberal arts, and then shows how insights from recent research on neuroplasticity provide good reason to believe that a traditional liberal education has positive effects on a person's brain. The paper supports the thesis that well-designed (...)
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  45. Thomas Erling Peterson (2008). The Art of Language Teaching as Interdisciplinary Paradigm. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (7):900-918.score: 21.0
    One can extrapolate from the art of language instruction to discover methods applicable across the disciplines in higher education. The paradigm presented by language instruction is applicable throughout the arts and sciences. If cultivated—and there are institutional pressures working against it—such an art can impact the languages and codes of the individual disciplines so as to advance the research mission of scholars in those fields; it can also favor the interrelationships between the disciplines. How the student learns another (...)
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  46. I. H. Kerridge, C. F. C. Jordens, R. Benson, R. Clifford, R. A. Ankeny, D. Keown, B. Tobin, S. Bhattacharyya, A. Sachedina, L. S. Lehmann & B. Edgar (2010). Religious Perspectives on Embryo Donation and Research. Clinical Ethics 5 (1):35-45.score: 21.0
    The success of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) worldwide has led to an accumulation of frozen embryos that are surplus to the reproductive needs of those for whom they were created. In these situations, couples must decide whether to discard them or donate them for scientific research or for use by other infertile couples. While legislation and regulation may limit the decisions that couples make, their decisions are often shaped by their religious beliefs. Unfortunately, health professionals, scientists and policy-makers (...)
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  47. Guillermo Marini (2014). Aristotelic Learning Through the Arts. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (2):171-184.score: 21.0
    The field of Philosophy and Education seems to be experiencing a renewed interest in the work of Aristotle. As recently reviewed by Curren (Oxf Rev Educ 36(5):543–559, 2010), most of this attention aligns with the virtue ethics movement where themes like moral development in education, and the inquiry on human flourishing as the aim of education are prevalent. For sources, this scholarship relies heavily and extensively on the Nicomachean Ethics and Politics’ Book VIII where Aristotle develops his single, clearly defined (...)
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  48. Charles Whitehead (2008). The Neural Correlates of Work and Play: What Brain Imaging Research and Animal Cartoons Can Tell Us About Social Displays, Self-Consciousness, and the Evolution of the Human Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):93-121.score: 21.0
    Children seem to have a profound implicit knowledge of human behaviour, because they laugh at Bugs Bunny cartoons where much of the humour depends on animals behaving like humans and our intuitive recognition that this is absurd. Scientists, on the other hand, have problems defining what this 'human difference' is. I suggest these problems are of cultural origin. For example, the industrial revolution and the protestant work ethic have created a world in which work is valued over play, object intelligence (...)
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  49. Gautam Bhattacharyya (2008). Genesis of an Academic Research Program. Journal of Research Practice 4 (1):Article D1.score: 21.0
    As students progress towards their PhD degrees, they will become more independent and practitioner-like; for those moving into academia, it is often assumed the programs of their PhD mentors will serve as prototypes for their own successful research programs. However, the author's research program as an Assistant Professor led him in directions never considered as a graduate student. The author had to make significant decisions in choosing a primary audience, finding an overarching theme, defining the individual problems, and (...)
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  50. D. P. Dash & Werner Ulrich (2012). Introducing New Editorial Roles and Measures: Making the Journal of Research Practice Relevant to Researchers. Journal of Research Practice 8 (1):Article - E1.score: 21.0
    Following a detailed review of the accomplishments and aspirations of the Journal of Research Practice, we have undertaken a restructuring of the editorial board, with inputs from people associated with this journal. In designing the new structure, we have taken into account the need for building the journal’s profile in the six focus areas recently clarified: (1) Research Applications, (2) Research Spaces, (3) Research Education, (4) Research Experiences, (5) Research Philosophy, and (6) Research (...)
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