Search results for 'Arts Research' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Kirsty Johnston (2010). Grafting Orchids and Ugly: Theatre, Disability and Arts-Based Health Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (4):279-294.
    Theatre-based health policy research is an emerging field, and this article investigates the work of one of its leaders. In 2005, prominent medical geneticist and playwright Jeff Nisker and his collaborators produced Orchids, his play concerning pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, to research theatre as a tool for engaging citizens in health policy development. Juxtaposing Orchids with a concurrent disability theatre production in Vancouver entitled Ugly, I argue that disability theatre suggests important means for building inclusiveness in this kind of (...)
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  2.  7
    Annalee Yassi, Jennifer Beth Spiegel, Karen Lockhart, Lynn Fels, Katherine Boydell & Judith Marcuse (forthcoming). Ethics in Community-University-Artist Partnered Research: Tensions, Contradictions and Gaps Identified in an ‘Arts for Social Change’ Project. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-22.
    Academics from diverse disciplines are recognizing not only the procedural ethical issues involved in research, but also the complexity of everyday “micro” ethical issues that arise. While ethical guidelines are being developed for research in aboriginal populations and low-and-middle-income countries, multi-partnered research initiatives examining arts-based interventions to promote social change pose a unique set of ethical dilemmas not yet fully explored. Our research team, comprising health, education, and social scientists, critical theorists, artists and community-activists launched (...)
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  3. Tom Barone (2008). How Arts-Based Research Can Change Minds. In Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.), Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge
     
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  4. Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor (2008). Arts-Based Research : Histories and New Directions. In Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.), Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge
     
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  5. Rolando Gripaldo (2012). Research: Arts and Humanities Way. Philosophia 41 (2).
    This paper argues that research in the arts and humanities should not be marginalized in the academe, as has generally been the situation, but should equally be given emphasis together with those researches in the social sciences. All the more they should be equally funded because they generally require a smaller outlay compared to those in the natural and social sciences. Moreover, outputs in AH qualitative researches can also be comparatively significant epistemologically, culturally, and historically.
     
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  6.  2
    Leslie Tomory (2013). Science and the Arts in William Henry's Research Into Inflammable Air During the Early Nineteenth Century. Annals of Science 71 (1):1-21.
    Historians have explored the continuities between science and the arts in the Industrial Revolution, with much recent historiography emphasizing the hybrid nature of the activities of men of science around 1800. Chemistry in particular displayed this sort of hybridity between the philosophical and practical because the materials under investigation were important across the research spectrum. Inflammable gases were an example of such hybrid objects: pneumatic chemists through the eighteenth century investigated them, and in the process created knowledge, processes (...)
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  7. Elliot Eisner (2008). Persistent Tensions in Arts-Based Research. In Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.), Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge
     
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  8.  3
    P. Scher (2000). Research and Evaluation of the Exeter Health Care Arts Project. Medical Humanities 26 (2):71-78.
    An arts project was initiated at the newly rebuilt district hospital in the city of Exeter in south west England. This paper describes an independent research evaluation project covering the period from its inception in 1992. The findings include both qualitative and economic aspects and were compared with the authors' wider experience of similar projects. For the first time the responses of clinical staff about the effects of art on the healing process, on therapeutic benefit and on morale (...)
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  9. Richard Siegesmund & Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor (2008). The Tensions of Arts-Based Research in Education Reconsidered : The Promise for Practice. In Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.), Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge
     
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  10. Courtney Kosky (2008). An Action Research Exploration Integrating Student Choice and Arts Activities in a Sixth. Journal of Social Studies Research 32:1.
     
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  11.  1
    David Wright (1978). Style in the Visual Arts as Material for Social Research. Social Research 45.
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  12. Laurence E. Winters, Eugene Kelly & August Viglione (1984). Continental Philosophy and the Arts: Current Continental Research. Upa.
    Co-published with the Center for Advanced Research in Phenomenology, this book is a collection of 10 original translations of articles written by philosophers on the topics of art and aesthetics in the 20th century. It is a significant contribution to the subject of aesthetics in making available previously untranslated texts by European philosophers. Suitable for courses in the philosophy of art, aesthetics and art history.
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  13.  12
    Lon Dubinsky & W. F. Garrett-Petts (2002). 'Working Well, Together': Arts-Based Research and the Cultural Future of Small Cities. [REVIEW] AI and Society 16 (4):332-349.
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  14.  3
    H. U. Jun (2011). A" Physical" Research Approach to Fine Arts Education History: On Diana Korzenik's Fine Arts Education Practice. Journal of Aesthetic Education 2:010.
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  15.  7
    Elena Esposito (2010). P. Oxy. LXXI (R.) Hatzilambrou, (P.J.) Parsons, (J.) Chapa (Edd., Trans.) [Et Al.] The Oxyrhynchus Papyri. Volume LXXI. (Graeco-Roman Memoirs 91.) Pp. Xii + 164, Colour Pls. London: Egypt Exploration Society for The Arts and Humanities Research Council, 2007. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-0-85698-174-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (01):285-.
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  16.  2
    David Pariser (forthcoming). Not Under the Lamppost: Piagetian and Neo-Piagetian Research in the Arts. A Review and Critique. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
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  17.  2
    Claudio de Stefani (2011). P. Oxy. LXXIV (D.) Leith, (D.C.) Parker, (S.R.) Pickering, (N.) Gonis, (M.) Malouta [Et Al.] (Edd., Trans.) The Oxyrhynchus Papyri. Volume LXXIV. (Graeco-Roman Memoirs 95.) Pp. Xii + 174, Pls. London: Egypt Exploration Society with The Arts and Humanities Research Council and The British Academy, 2009. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-0-85698-183-8. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):435-437.
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  18.  2
    Peter Goldie (2010). ALLAN, DEREK. Art and the Human Adventure: Andre Malreaux's Theory of Art.(Amsterdam: Rodopi). 2009. Pp. 342.£ 64.60 (Pbk). BARRETT, ESTELLE and BOLT, BARBARA (Eds). Practice as Research: Approaches to Creative Arts Enquiry.(London: IB Tauris). 2010. Pp. 224.£ 17.99 (Pbk). [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (2):223.
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  19.  3
    D. Kirklin (2003). Editorial: Medical Students and Arts and Humanities Research--Fostering Creativity, Inquisitiveness, and Lateral Thinking. Medical Humanities 29 (2):103-103.
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  20. Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.) (2008). Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge.
  21. Howard Gardner (1977). Sifting the Special From the Shared: Notes Toward an Agenda for Research in Arts Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 11 (2):31.
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  22. Mark A. Gilbert, William M. Lydiatt, Virginia A. Aita, Regina E. Robbins, Dennis P. McNeilly & Michele Marie Desmarais (forthcoming). Portrait of a Process: Arts-Based Research in a Head and Neck Cancer Clinic. Medical Humanities:medhum-2015-010813.
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  23. Jillian Hamilton & Sue Carson (2015). Speaking of Supervision: A Dialogic Approach to Building Higher Degree Research Supervision Capacity in the Creative Arts. Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (12):1348-1366.
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  24. Angela Romano (forthcoming). Ethical Review as a Tool for Enhancing Postgraduate Supervision and Research Outcomes in the Creative Arts. Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-13.
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  25. Morris Weitz (1977). Research on the Arts and in Aesthetics: Some Pitfalls, Some Possibilities. Journal of Aesthetic Education 11 (2):9.
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  26.  5
    Lynn Butler-Kisber & Tiiu Poldma (2011). The Power of Visual Approaches in Qualitative Inquiry: The Use of Collage Making and Concept Mapping in Experiential Research. Journal of Research Practice 6 (2):Article M18.
    The burgeoning interest in arts-informed research and the increasing variety of visual possibilities as a result of new technologies have paved the way for researchers to explore and use visual forms of inquiry. This article investigates how collage making and concept mapping are useful visual approaches that can inform qualitative research. They are experiential ways of doing/knowing that help to get at tacit aspects of both understanding and process and to make these more explicit to the researcher (...)
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  27. Juha Varto (2009). Basics of Artistic Research: Ontological, Epistemological and Historical Justifications. University of Art and Design Helsinki.
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  28.  4
    Morwenna Griffiths, Judy Berry, Anne Holt, John Naylor & Philippa Weekes (2006). Learning to Be in Public Spaces: In From the Margins with Dancers, Sculptors, Painters and Musicians. British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (3):352 - 371.
    This article reports research in three Nottingham schools, concerned with (1) 'The school as fertile ground: how the ethos of a school enables everyone in it to benefit from the presence of artists in class'; (2) 'Children on the edge: how the arts reach those children who otherwise exclude themselves from class activities, for any reason' and (3) 'Children's voices and choices: how even very young children can learn to express their wishes, and then have them realised through (...)
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  29.  8
    Kamata Toji (2016). Shinto Research and the Humanities in Japan. Zygon 51 (1):43-62.
    Three approaches to scholarship are “scholarship as a way,” which aims at perfection of character; “scholarship as a method,” which clearly limits objects and methods in order to achieve precise perception and new knowledge; and “scholarship as an expression,” which takes various approaches to questions and inquiry. The “humanities” participate deeply and broadly in all three of these approaches. In relation to this view of the humanities, Japanese Shinto is a field of study that yields rich results. As a religion (...)
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  30. Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2003). Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of sustained, critical attention it deserves. Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts represents the work of fifteen young yet distinguished philosophers of art, who critically examine just how and in what form the notion of imagination illuminates fundamental problems in the philosophy of art. All new papers, a strong collection on the (...)
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  31.  21
    Lance Moir & Richard Taffler (2004). Does Corporate Philanthropy Exist?: Business Giving to the Arts in the U.K. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):149 - 161.
    This paper addresses the question of the existence of corporate philanthropy. It proposes a framework for analysing corporate philanthropy along the dimensions of business/society interest and primary/secondary stakeholder focus. The framework is then applied in order to understand business involvement with the arts in the U.K. A unique dataset of 60 texts which describe different firms' involvement with the Arts is analysed using formal content analysis to uncover the motivations for business involvement. Cluster analysis is then used in (...)
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  32.  18
    Darryl Reed (2004). Universities and the Promotion of Corporate Responsibility: Reinterpreting the Liberal Arts Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (1):3-41.
    The issue of corporate responsibility has long been discussed in relationship to universities, but generally only in an ad hoc fashion. While the role of universities in teaching business ethics is one theme that has received significant and rather constant attention, other issues tend to be raised only sporadically. Moreover, when issues of corporate responsibility are raised, it is often done on the presumption of some understanding of a liberal arts mandate of the university, a position that has come (...)
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  33.  77
    Jennifer A. McMahon (2002). An Explanation for Normal and Anomalous Drawing Ability and Some Implications for Research on Perception and Imagery. Visual Arts Research 28 (1):38-52.
    The aim of this paper is to draw the attention of those conducting research on imagery to the different kinds of visual information deployed by expert drawers compared to non-expert drawers. To demonstrate this difference I draw upon the cognitive science literature on vision and imagery to distinguish between three different ways that visual phenomena can be represented in memory: structural descriptions, denotative descriptions, and configural descriptions. Research suggests that perception and imagery deploy the same mental processes and (...)
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  34.  3
    Kiran Pohar Manhas & Kathleen Oberle (2015). The Ethics of Metaphor as a Research Tool. Research Ethics 11 (1):42-51.
    The interpretive and subjective nature of qualitative research has led to growing utilization of arts-based strategies for data collection, analysis and dissemination. The defining characteristic of all such strategies is that they are largely subjective and intended to invoke personal responses in the ‘audience.’ Following that direction, many qualitative researchers are using metaphor to capture themes emerging from their analysis. In this article, we explore ethical aspects of using metaphor in describing results of qualitative health research and (...)
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  35. Charles Ess (2003). Liberal Arts and Distance Education: Can Socratic Virtue and Confucius’ Exemplary Person Be Taught Online? Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 2 (2):117-137.
    The goals of a global liberal arts education, as conjoining both western and eastern sources, focus on ‘virtue first’, i.e. on pursuing human excellence . To determine whether such excellence can be taught online, I turn to contemporary research on Computer-Mediated Communication and online education. Among other factors, important cultural issues as well as the real costs of online education have moderated 1990s enthusiasm for online learning as ‘revolutionary’. I then take up Hubert Dreyfus’ pedagogical taxonomy as it (...)
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  36.  3
    Elizabeth Grierson (2007). Difference: A Critical Investigation of the Creative Arts with Attention to Art as a Site of Knowledge. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):531–542.
    This paper brings a critical focus to difference and the creative arts in education with specific attention to art as a site of knowledge in New Zealand conditions. The 1990s and early 2000s are marked by a paucity of critically engaged literature on the arts in education and a conspicuous absence of discussions on the politics of difference. Alongside the global return to empirical research in education where quantifiable data‐based projects tend to attract attention ahead of fundamentally (...)
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  37.  13
    I. H. Kerridge, C. F. C. Jordens, R. Benson, R. Clifford, R. A. Ankeny, D. Keown, B. Tobin, S. Bhattacharyya, A. Sachedina, L. S. Lehmann & B. Edgar (2010). Religious Perspectives on Embryo Donation and Research. Clinical Ethics 5 (1):35-45.
    The success of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) worldwide has led to an accumulation of frozen embryos that are surplus to the reproductive needs of those for whom they were created. In these situations, couples must decide whether to discard them or donate them for scientific research or for use by other infertile couples. While legislation and regulation may limit the decisions that couples make, their decisions are often shaped by their religious beliefs. Unfortunately, health professionals, scientists and policy-makers (...)
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  38.  4
    Aili Bresnahan (2015). Improvisation in the Arts. Philosophy Compass 10 (9):573-582.
    This article focuses primarily on improvisation in the arts as discussed in philosophical aesthetics, supplemented with accounts of improvisational practice by arts theorists and educators. It begins with an overview of the term improvisation, first as it is used in general and then as it is used to describe particular products and practices in the individual arts. From here, questions and challenges that improvisation raises for the traditional work-of-art concept, the type-token distinction, and the appreciation and evaluation (...)
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  39.  10
    A. Santosuosso, V. Sellaroli & E. Fabio (2007). What Constitutional Protection for Freedom of Scientific Research? Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (6):342-344.
    Is freedom of research protected at the constitutional level? No obvious answer can be given to this question, as European and Northern American constitutional systems are not unequivocal and the topic has not been discussed deeply enough.Looking at the constitutions of some European and Northern American countries, it is possible to immediately note that there are essentially two ways to deal with freedom of scientific research. On the one hand, in Canada and in the US, constitutions have no (...)
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  40.  25
    Richard A. Smith & John R. Leach (2010). Liberal Arts Education and Brain Plasticity. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (2):119-130.
    This paper addresses what some view as a progressive and decades-long devaluing of the liberal arts in our educational institutions and society at large. It draws attention to symptoms of this trend and possible contributing factors, identifies benefits commonly attributed to the liberal arts, and then shows how insights from recent research on neuroplasticity provide good reason to believe that a traditional liberal education has positive effects on a person's brain. The paper supports the thesis that well-designed (...)
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  41.  1
    Peter Willis (2004). From “The Things Themselves” to a “Feeling of Understanding”: Finding Different Voices in Phenomenological Research. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 4 (1).
    This paper explores some of the ways in which phenomenological approaches have been linked to contemporary social science inquiry into human ways of knowing and learning in the fields of education and nursing research. It then looks at four contemporary approaches which draw on phenomenology namely: distinguishing imaginal from rational/logical knowing as an alternative and complementary mode of knowing; using ‘arts based’ or ‘expressive’ approaches to inquiry; developing hermeneutic text making to present research findings and using heuristics (...)
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  42. Kakali Bhattacharya (2008). Voices Lost and Found : Using Found Poetry in Qualitative Research. In Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor & Richard Siegesmund (eds.), Arts-Based Research in Education: Foundations for Practice. Routledge
     
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  43.  12
    Guillermo Marini (2014). Aristotelic Learning Through the Arts. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (2):171-184.
    The field of Philosophy and Education seems to be experiencing a renewed interest in the work of Aristotle. As recently reviewed by Curren (Oxf Rev Educ 36(5):543–559, 2010), most of this attention aligns with the virtue ethics movement where themes like moral development in education, and the inquiry on human flourishing as the aim of education are prevalent. For sources, this scholarship relies heavily and extensively on the Nicomachean Ethics and Politics’ Book VIII where Aristotle develops his single, clearly defined (...)
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  44.  4
    W. P. Seeley (2012). Hearing How Smooth It Looks: Selective Attention and Crossmodal Perception in the Arts. Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):8.
    A broad range of behavior is associated with crossmodal perception in the arts. Philosophical explanations of crossmodal perception often make reference to neuroscientific discussions of multisensory integration in selective attention. This research demonstrates that superior colliculus plays a regulative role in attention, integrating unique modality specific visual, auditory, and somatosensory spatial maps into a common spatial framework for action, and that motor skill, emotional salience, and semantic salience contribute to the integration of auditory, visual, and somatosensory information in (...)
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  45.  16
    Anna Chesnokova (2010). Muses and Measures: Empirical Research Methods for the Humanities (Review). Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (4):120-121.
    Sometimes one book is enough to change the whole way of thinking or general attitude of students, and this is the case with Muses and Measures: Empirical Research Methods for the Humanities. Now that empirical research methods are getting their due recognition in the spheres of Literature, Arts, and other media, the volume is really welcome. It is a practice-oriented book to help students and tutors either to get acquainted with methodology that is still new to them (...)
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  46.  8
    Dean Keith Simonton (1986). Theory and Philosophy in the Psychology of the Arts. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 6 (2):122-123.
    Philosophy, historically at least, has played a large role in aesthetics, for philosophical aesthetics dates back to Aristotle's Poetics, and has attracted the attention of such notable thinkers as Kant, Dewey, Santayana, and Croce. Nonetheless, if I had to identify the philosophical foundation of most empirical astheticians, hedonism emerges as the clear winner. That is, researchers who study why people appreciate art subscribe to the pleasure theory of aesthetics. On the theoretical side, psychology of the arts is also richly (...)
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  47.  6
    H. Moss, C. Donnellan & D. O'Neill (2012). A Review of Qualitative Methodologies Used to Explore Patient Perceptions of Arts and Healthcare. [REVIEW] Medical Humanities 38 (2):106-109.
    Although the importance of the arts in healthcare is increasingly recognised, further research is needed to investigate the mechanisms by which arts and health programmes achieve their impact. An overview of the qualitative methods used to explore patients' perceptions of these interventions is lacking. We reviewed the literature to gain insights into the qualitative methods used to explore patients' perceptions of the role of arts in healthcare with a view to identifying the most common methodologies used (...)
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  48.  12
    Charles Whitehead (2008). The Neural Correlates of Work and Play: What Brain Imaging Research and Animal Cartoons Can Tell Us About Social Displays, Self-Consciousness, and the Evolution of the Human Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):93-121.
    Children seem to have a profound implicit knowledge of human behaviour, because they laugh at Bugs Bunny cartoons where much of the humour depends on animals behaving like humans and our intuitive recognition that this is absurd. Scientists, on the other hand, have problems defining what this 'human difference' is. I suggest these problems are of cultural origin. For example, the industrial revolution and the protestant work ethic have created a world in which work is valued over play, object intelligence (...)
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  49.  1
    Louise Ammentorp (2007). Imagining Social Change: Developing Social Consciousness in an Arts-Based Pedagogy. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 9 (1):38-52.
    This paper is a study of a social-justice, arts-based literacy curriculum in a low income, working-class, predominately African-American school district in Newark, New Jersey. Participating students studied photography and poetry of established artists and took and developed their own photographs accompanied by written narratives. As a part of the curriculum students also wrote poetry and analytical essays. I present my findings within the context of a Vygotskian pedagogical approach that takes social consciousness and metaphor as its central concepts. The (...)
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  50.  2
    N. G. Mekhed (1987). Artistic Creations as Objects of Ethical Research. Russian Studies in Philosophy 25 (4):65-86.
    The past development of ethical knowledge has shown that in determining the future orientations of ethical research, the multiplicity of interconnecting links between ethics, the philosophy of morals, and the whole of intellectual culture have yet to receive sufficient study. At the same time, the sociocultural legacy—the framework within which philosophical thought lies—syncretically embraces science, art, and philosophy. Remaining "beyond the sequence" of philosophical abstraction, science and art are present as the sociocultural background of ethical thought. Inasmuch as morals (...)
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