Search results for 'Arts, Japanese' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mara Miller (2004). Four Approaches to Emotion in Japanese Visual Arts. In Paolo Santangelo (ed.), Emotion in Asia. Universita degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale.score: 120.0
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  2. Sor-Ching Low (2010). The Japanese Arts and Self-Cultivation (Review). Philosophy East and West 60 (1):pp. 123-125.score: 120.0
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  3. Sor-Ching Low (2009). The Japanese Arts and Self-Cultivation (Review). Philosophy East and West 60 (1):123-125.score: 120.0
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  4. Einat Bar-On Cohen (2006). Kime in Japanese Martial Arts and the Moving Body. Body and Society 12 (4):73-93.score: 120.0
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  5. Stephen Chan (2000). The Construction and Export of Culture as Artefact: The Case of Japanese Marital Arts. Body and Society 6 (1):69-74.score: 120.0
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  6. Einat Bar-On Cohen (2006). Kime and the Moving Body: Somatic Codes in Japanese Martial Arts. Body and Society 12 (4):73-93.score: 120.0
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  7. Akio Okazaki & K. Nakamura (2003). Introduction: Japanese Arts and Aesthetic Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (4):1-2.score: 120.0
     
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  8. Rodica Frentiu (2014). Religious Art and Meditative Contemplation in Japanese Calligraphy and Byzantine Iconography. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 13 (38):110-136.score: 96.0
    Far Eastern calligraphy has always been regarded by the Occident as an “esoteric” issue, laden with a peculiar “mysticism,” which presents spiritual and philosophical aspects too outlandish to truly comprehend. That is probably the reason why calligraphy was amongst the last artistic “disciplines” to gain access to the international world of the arts. This study focuses on Japanese calligraphy as a visual and verbal image, conducting a hermeneutic investigation into the nature and function of this type of image, into (...)
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  9. Sonja Servomaa (2007). Beauty in the Pine: Creative Expressiveness of the Pine in Japanese Aesthetics. Yliopistopaino, Helsinki Univ. Press.score: 78.0
     
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  10. Makoto Ueda (1967/1991). Literary and Art Theories in Japan. Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan.score: 70.0
  11. Machiko Kusahara (2002). Toward Digital Biodiversity: Reading Japanese Digital Art in a Cultural Context. Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 4:249-270.score: 66.0
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  12. Yin-Wah Chu (2012). Studies of Japanese Society and Culture: Sociology and Cognate Disciplines in Hong Kong. Japanese Journal of Political Science 13 (2):201-221.score: 60.0
    This paper reviews the studies of Japanese society and culture undertaken by Hong Kong-based sociologists and scholars in related disciplines. It presents information on research projects funded by the Research Grants Council, Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), and Arts and Humanities Citation Index (A&HCI) journal articles, authored and edited books, book chapters, non-SSCI and non-A&HCI journal articles, as well as master and doctoral theses written by scholars and graduate students associated with Hong Kong's major universities. It is found that (...)
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  13. Shūzō Kuki (2009). "Cui" de Gou Zao. Lian Jing Chu Ban Shi Ye Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.score: 60.0
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  14. Eva Maria Raepple, Divan Japonais: Toulouse-Lautrec and Japanese Art.score: 48.0
    The French nineteenth century artists Henry Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901) is known for his distinctive style and bold character portraits of the theatrical scene of the gaslight era in Paris. The paper examines some of the formative influences of eighteenth century Japanese art on the development of visual characters, with specific focus on a lithograph entitled Divan Japonais. Alluding to the refined representation of Japanese courtesans, subtle nuanced reminiscences to an ideal of elegance create an allusion to highly respected courtesans (...)
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  15. Mina Ryōke (2009). Dentō Kōgei to Kansei Hyōka. Jaist Press.score: 48.0
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  16. Sherman E. Lee (1962). Contrasts in Chinese and Japanese Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 21 (1):3-12.score: 42.0
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  17. Makoto Ueda (1961). Zeami on Art: A Chapter for the History of Japanese Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 20 (1):73-79.score: 42.0
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  18. Mara Miller (2010). Muroji: Rearranging Art and History at a Japanese Buddhist Temple by Fowler, Sherry D. Daitokuji: The Visual Cultures of a Zen Monastery by Levine, Gregory P. A. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):176-179.score: 42.0
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  19. Steve Odin (1985). The Penumbral Shadow: A Whiteheadian Perspective on the Yūgen Style of Art and Literature in Japanese Aesthetics. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 12 (1):63-90.score: 42.0
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  20. Ryōsuke Ōhashi (2002). The Hermeneutic Approach to Japanese Modernity:'Art-Way,''Iki,'and'Cut-Continuance.'. In Michael F. Marra (ed.), Japanese Hermeneutics: Current Debates on Aesthetics and Interpretation. University of Hawai'i Press. 25--35.score: 42.0
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  21. Mara Miller (forthcoming). Review of Sherry D. Fowler's Muroji: Rearranging Art and History at a Japanese Buddhist Temple and Gregory Levine's Daitokuji: The Visual Cultures of a Zen Monastery. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.score: 42.0
     
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  22. Yuriko Saitō (2003). Representing the Essence of Objects: Art in the Japanese Aesthetic Tradition. In Stephen Davies & Ananta Charana Sukla (eds.), Art and Essence. Praeger. 8--125.score: 42.0
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  23. Adrian Snodgrass (2006). Review Of: Sherry D. Fowler, Murōji: Rearranging Art and History at a Japanese Buddhist Temple. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 33:187-190.score: 42.0
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  24. Bob Wilkinson (2012). Focillon, Bergson and Buddhist Aesthetics: A Point in Focillon's Reception of Japanese Art. Contrastes: Supplementos 17:275-288.score: 42.0
    Focillon fastens exactly on a deep difference in the understanding of aesthetic contemplation in the Western and Eastern traditions. Western analyses presuppose and embody assumptions about the ontological ultimacy of individuals that are absent from Eastern traditions in which the ultimate is conceived of as nothingness. Focillon grasped this, and his views are contrasted with those of Bergson, as well as being confirmed by his contemporary, the eminent Japanese philosopher Nishida.
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  25. Pamela D. Winfield (2013). Icons and Iconoclasm in Japanese Buddhism: Kukai and Dogen on the Art of Enlightenment. Oup Usa.score: 42.0
    Pamela D. Winfield offers a fascinating juxtaposition and comparison of the thoughts of two pre-modern Japanese Buddhist masters, Kukai (774-835) and Dogen (1200-1253) on the role of imagery in the enlightenment experience.
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  26. Yoshimasa Kaneko (2003). Japanese Painting and Johannes Itten's Art Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (4):93-101.score: 40.0
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  27. Rita M. Gross (2013). Bringing Zen Home: The Healing Art of Japanese Women's Rituals by Paula Arai (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 33 (1):217-220.score: 40.0
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  28. A. B. (1963). Zen in Japanese Art-A Way of Spiritual Experience. Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):801-801.score: 40.0
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  29. Rita M. Gross (2013). Bringing Zen Home: The Healing Art of Japanese Women's Rituals by Paula Arai. [REVIEW] Buddhist-Christian Studies 33 (1):217-220.score: 40.0
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  30. K. Nishitani (1991). Ikebana, on Pure Japanese Art. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 98 (2):314-320.score: 40.0
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  31. G. Seubold (1993). The Content and Dimension of the Japanese Concept of Art. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 100 (2):380-398.score: 40.0
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  32. Tsunetomo Yamamoto (2008). The Art of the Samurai: Yamamoto Tsunetomo's Hagakure, the New Illustrated Edition of the Classic Japanese Warrior Code. Duncan Baird Publishers.score: 40.0
    Death in the life of the samurai -- An introduction to Yamamoto Tunetomo's Hagakure -- The Hagakure -- A leisurely chat in the evening shadows -- A samurai must devote his heart firmly to bushidō -- Hardship is a beneficial experience -- There is nothing as deep as giri -- Close your eyes and think of your lord -- Death is a punishment not meted out lightly -- Even if it contains poison, what's the big deal? -- Naritomi Hyōgo's words (...)
     
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  33. Diane Durston (2006). Wabi Sabi: The Art of Everyday Life. Storey Pub..score: 38.0
    With “slow living” as the newest incarnation of the simplicity movement, the search for fresh inspiration on ways to live a more authentic life is as pressing as ever. Turning to Eastern traditions, people are discovering the Japanese concept of wabi sabi. The perfect antidote to today’s frenzied, consumer-oriented culture, wabi sabi encourages slowing down, living modestly, and appreciating the natural and imperfect aspect of material culture. While defying definition, wabi sabi is best expressed in brief, evocative bites. In (...)
     
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  34. John P. Keenan (1989). Spontaneity in Western Martial Arts: A Yogācāra Critique of" Mushin"(No-Mind). Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 16 (4):285-298.score: 36.0
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  35. John P. Keenan (1990). The Mystique of Martial Arts: A Response to Professor McFarlane. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 17 (4):421-432.score: 36.0
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  36. Masatoshi Nagatomi, William R. LaFleur & James H. Sanford (1993). Flowing Traces: Buddhism in the Literary and Visual Arts of Japan. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 20:73-77.score: 36.0
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  37. Stephen Addiss (2001). Book Review: Joseph D. Parker, Zen Buddhist Landscape Arts of Early Muromachi Japan (1336-1573). [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 28:184-186.score: 36.0
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  38. Machiko Kusahara (2003). They Are Born to Play: Japanese Visual Entertainment From Nintendo to Mobile Phone. Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 5:111-154.score: 36.0
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  39. Stewart McFarlane (1990). Mushin, Morals, and Martial Arts: A Discussion of Keenan's Yogācāra Critique. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 17 (4):397-420.score: 36.0
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  40. Stewart McFarlane (1991). The Mystique of Martial Arts: A Reply to Professor Keenan's Response. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 18 (4):355-368.score: 36.0
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  41. Wilfried van Damme (2010). Ernst Grosse and the "Ethnological Method" in Art Theory. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):302-312.score: 34.0
    Why are the Germans good at music, whereas the Dutch excel in painting? What are the reasons for the outstanding draftsmanship of Australian Aboriginals, and why does this skill seem absent among West African peoples, who appear concerned rather with sculpture? Could it be that the Japanese do not share the European preference for symmetry in decorative art? Moreover, why do tastes in the visual arts, music, and literature change so noticeably throughout history? Is it possible that, despite differences (...)
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  42. Mara Miller & Koji Yamasaki (forthcoming). Ainu Aesthetics. In Minh Nguyen (ed.), New Studies in Japanese Aesthetics. Lexington Books.score: 30.0
    Ainu artists were invited to make “replicas” of traditional Ainu arts held in an important museum collection and describe their choices, process and results. The resulting Ainu aesthetics challenges—and changes—our understanding of aesthetics and the philosophy of art, on four levels: descriptive aesthetics, categorical aesthetics (the categories through which the Ainu understand aesthetic value), implications of these aesthetics for a variety of human activities such as museum practice and daily life, and the implications of the first three for our broader (...)
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  43. Mara Miller (2012). East Asian Aesthetics. In Sheng Kuan Chung (ed.), Teaching Asian art: Content, Context, and Pedagogy. The National Art Education Association.score: 30.0
    Aesthetics and arts are strongly linked across East Asia (China, Japan and Korea) and (through pottery and gardens) throughout Southeast Asia as well. This paper outlines eight aesthetic issues pertaining across arts in East Asia, appropriate for K-12: 1) the intimate interrelations among arts (gardens, painting, poetry, calligraphy, music, tea ceremony); 2) nature and the seasons (architecture, poetry, gardens, food); 4) collaboration (poetry, gardens, festivals, and tea ceremony); 5) self-cultivation; 6) symbolism versus allusion; 7) the importance of active imagination in (...)
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  44. Thomas F. Cleary (ed.) (2008). Training the Samurai Mind: A Bushido Sourcebook. Distributed in the United States by Random House, Inc..score: 24.0
    Honor, fearlessness, calm, decisive action, strategic thinking, and martial prowess have been the hallmarks of the Japanese samurai culture through the ages. Their ethos is known as bushido, or the way of the warrior-knight. Here is an insider’s view of the samurai—their moral and psychological development, the ethical standards they strive to uphold, their training in both martial arts and strategy, and the enormous role that the traditions of Shintoism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism had in influencing their ideals. Thomas (...)
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  45. Damon A. Young (2009). Bowing to Your Enemies: Courtesy, Budō , and Japan. Philosophy East and West 59 (2):pp. 188-215.score: 24.0
    Courtesy seems to be an essential part of budō , the Japanese martial ways. Yet there is no prima facie relationship between fighting and courtesy. Indeed, we might think that violence and aggression are antithetical to etiquette and care. By situating budō within the three great Japanese traditions of Shintō, Confucianism, and Zen Buddhism, this article reveals the intimate relationship between courtesy and the martial arts. It suggests that courtesy cultivates, and is cultivated by, purity of work and (...)
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  46. S. Nagatomo & G. Leisman (1996). An East Asian Perspective of Mind-Body. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (4):439-466.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses a need to re-examine the mind-body dualism established since Descartes. Descartes' dualism has been regarded by modern philosophers as an extremely insufficient solution to the problem of mind and body, from which is derived a long opposition in modern epistomology between idealism and empiricism. This dualism, bifurcating the region of spirit and matter, and the dichotomous models of thinking based on this dualism, have long dominated the world of modern philosophy and science. The paper examines states of (...)
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  47. Jamie Allen (2012). Cum on Feel the Noize. Continent 2 (1):56-58.score: 24.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 56–58 Nechvatal, Joseph, Immersion Into Noise , Open Humanities Press, 2011, 267 pp, $23.99 (pbk), ISBN 1-60785-241-1. As someone who’s knowledge of “art” mostly began with the domestic (Western) and Japanese punk and noise scenes of the late 80’s and early 90’s, practices and theories of noise fall rather close to my heart. It is peeking into the esoteric enclaves of weird music and noise that helped me understand what I think I might like art to (...)
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  48. Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (1959/2010). Zen and Japanese Culture. New York]Pantheon Books.score: 22.0
    One of this century's leading works on Zen, this book is a valuable source for those wishing to understand its concepts in the context of Japanese life and art.
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  49. Gian Carlo Calza (2007). Japan Style. Phaidon.score: 20.0
     
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