25 found
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  1. Asifa Majid, Melissa Bowerman, Sotaro Kita, Daniel B. M. Haun & Stephen C. Levinson (2004). Can Language Restructure Cognition? The Case for Space. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):108-114.
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  2. Naveen Khetarpal, Asifa Majid & Terry Regier (2009). Spatial Terms Reflect Near-Optimal Spatial Categories. In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. 2396--2401.
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  3.  4
    Asifa Majid & Niclas Burenhult (2014). Odors Are Expressible in Language, as Long as You Speak the Right Language. Cognition 130 (2):266-270.
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  4.  61
    Stephen C. Levinson & Asifa Majid (2014). Differential Ineffability and the Senses. Mind and Language 29 (4):407-427.
    Ineffability, the degree to which percepts or concepts resist linguistic coding, is a fairly unexplored nook of cognitive science. Although philosophical preoccupations with qualia or nonconceptual content certainly touch upon the area, there has been little systematic thought and hardly any empirical work in recent years on the subject. We argue that ineffability is an important domain for the cognitive sciences. For examining differential ineffability across the senses may be able to tell us important things about how the mind works, (...)
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  5.  12
    Asifa Majid & Miriam Staden (2015). Can Nomenclature for the Body Be Explained by Embodiment Theories? Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):570-594.
    According to widespread opinion, the meaning of body part terms is determined by salient discontinuities in the visual image; such that hands, feet, arms, and legs, are natural parts. If so, one would expect these parts to have distinct names which correspond in meaning across languages. To test this proposal, we compared three unrelated languages—Dutch, Japanese, and Indonesian—and found both naming systems and boundaries of even basic body part terms display variation across languages. Bottom-up cues alone cannot explain natural language (...)
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  6.  8
    Ewelina Wnuk & Asifa Majid (2014). Revisiting the Limits of Language: The Odor Lexicon of Maniq. Cognition 131 (1):125-138.
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  7. Asifa Majid, Melissa Bowerman, Miriam van Staden & James S. Boster (2007). The Semantic Categories of Cutting and Breaking Events: A Crosslinguistic Perspective. Cognitive Linguistics 18 (2).
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  8.  28
    Asifa Majid & Stephen C. Levinson (2010). WEIRD Languages Have Misled Us, Too. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):103-103.
    The linguistic and cognitive sciences have severely underestimated the degree of linguistic diversity in the world. Part of the reason for this is that we have projected assumptions based on English and familiar languages onto the rest. We focus on some distortions this has introduced, especially in the study of semantics.
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  9.  8
    Roger P. G. van Gompel & Asifa Majid (2004). Antecedent Frequency Effects During the Processing of Pronouns. Cognition 90 (3):255-264.
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  10.  16
    Asifa Majid (2012). Current Emotion Research in the Language Sciences. Emotion Review 4 (4):432-443.
    When researchers think about the interaction between language and emotion, they typically focus on descriptive emotion words. This review demonstrates that emotion can interact with language at many levels of structure, from the sound patterns of a language to its lexicon and grammar, and beyond to how it appears in conversation and discourse. Findings are considered from diverse subfields across the language sciences, including cognitive linguistics, psycholinguistics, linguistic anthropology, and conversation analysis. Taken together, it is clear that emotional expression is (...)
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  11.  5
    Asifa Majid (2015). Cultural Factors Shape Olfactory Language. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (11):629-630.
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  12.  2
    Asifa Majid, James S. Boster & Melissa Bowerman (2008). The Cross-Linguistic Categorization of Everyday Events: A Study of Cutting and Breaking. Cognition 109 (2):235-250.
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  13.  7
    Andrea Bender, Sieghard Beller, Giovanni Bennardo, James S. Boster, Asifa Majid & Douglas L. Medin (2010). Bridging the Gap: From Cognitive Anthropology to Cognitive Science. In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society
  14.  10
    Asifa Majid (2002). Frames of Reference and Language Concepts. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (12):503-504.
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  15.  20
    Asifa Majid & Stephen C. Levinson (2008). Language Does Provide Support for Basic Tastes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):86-87.
    Recurrent lexicalization patterns across widely different cultural contexts can provide a window onto common conceptualizations. The cross-linguistic data support the idea that sweet, salt, sour, and bitter are basic tastes. In addition, umami and fatty are likely basic tastes, as well.
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  16.  13
    Asifa Majid, Anthony J. Sanford & Martin J. Pickering (2006). Covariation and Quantifier Polarity: What Determines Causal Attribution in Vignettes? Cognition 99 (1):35-51.
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  17.  17
    Asifa Majid (2012). The Role of Language in a Science of Emotion. Emotion Review 4 (4):380-381.
    Emotion scientists often take an ambivalent stance concerning the role of language in a science of emotion. However, it is important for emotion researchers to contemplate some of the consequences of current practices for their theory building. There is a danger of an overreliance on the English language as a transparent window into emotion categories. More consideration has to be given to cross-linguistic comparison in the future so that models of language acquisition and of the language–cognition interface fit better the (...)
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  18.  50
    Asifa Majid & Falk Huettig (2008). A Crosslinguistic Perspective on Semantic Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):720-721.
    Coherent covariation appears to be a powerful explanatory factor accounting for a range of phenomena in semantic cognition. But its role in accounting for the crosslinguistic facts is less clear. Variation in naming, within the same semantic domain, raises vexing questions about the necessary parameters needed to account for the basic facts underlying categorization.
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  19.  11
    Debi Roberson, Mariko Kikutani, Paula Döge, Lydia Whitaker & Asifa Majid (2012). Shades of Emotion: What the Addition of Sunglasses or Masks to Faces Reveals About the Development of Facial Expression Processing. Cognition 125 (2):195-206.
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  20.  3
    Lila San Roque, Kobin H. Kendrick, Elisabeth Norcliffe, Penelope Brown, Rebecca Defina, Mark Dingemanse, Tyko Dirksmeyer, N. J. Enfield, Simeon Floyd, Jeremy Hammond, Giovanni Rossi, Sylvia Tufvesson, Saskia van Putten & Asifa Majid (2015). Vision Verbs Dominate in Conversation Across Cultures, but the Ranking of Non-Visual Verbs Varies. Cognitive Linguistics 26 (1):31-60.
    To what extent does perceptual language reflect universals of experience and cognition, and to what extent is it shaped by particular cultural preoccupations? This paper investigates the universality~relativity of perceptual language by examining the use of basic perception terms in spontaneous conversation across 13 diverse languages and cultures. We analyze the frequency of perception words to test two universalist hypotheses: that sight is always a dominant sense, and that the relative ranking of the senses will be the same across different (...)
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  21.  4
    Bhuvana Narasimhan, Anetta Kopecka, Melissa Bowerman, Marianne Gullberg & Asifa Majid (2012). Putting and Taking Events. In Anetta Kopecka & Bhuvana Narasimhan (eds.), Events of "Putting" and "Taking": A Crosslinguistic Perspective. John Benjamins Pub. Co. 1.
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  22.  2
    Dan I. Slobin, Iraide Ibarretxe-Antuñano, Anetta Kopecka & Asifa Majid (2014). Manners of Human Gait: A Crosslinguistic Event-Naming Study. Cognitive Linguistics 25 (4).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cognitive Linguistics Jahrgang: 25 Heft: 4 Seiten: 701-741.
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  23.  1
    Asifa Majid, Nicholas Evans, Alice Gaby & Stephen C. Levinson (2011). The Semantics of Reciprocal Constructions Across Languages. In Nicholas Evans (ed.), Reciprocals and Semantic Typology. John Benjamins Pub. Company 29.
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  24. Asifa Majid, Marianne Gullberg, Miriam van Staden & Melissa Bowerman (2007). How Similar Are Semantic Categories in Closely Related Languages? A Comparison of Cutting and Breaking in Four Germanic Languages. Cognitive Linguistics 18 (2).
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  25. Asifa Majid, Christian J. Rapold, Peter Hurst, Ulrike Zeshan, Toshiki Osada, N. J. Enfield, Nicole Kruspe & Niclas Burenhult (2011). Nicholas Evans. In Nicholas Evans (ed.), Reciprocals and Semantic Typology. John Benjamins Pub. Company 341.
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