Search results for 'Asperger' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marcos Malta Campos (2011). Uma Compreensão Daseinsanalítica Do Mundo de Christopher: Protagonista Do Romance “O Estranho Caso Do Cachorro Morto", E Diagnosticado Com Transtorno de Asperger. Aletheia 34:190-196.score: 24.0
    Este artigo tem como objetivo realizar uma compreensão daseinsanalítica do ser-nomundo do adolescente Christopher, protagonista do romance O Estranho Caso do Cachorro Morto, explicitando as relações do personagem com as pessoas de seu mundo. Partindo do diagnóstico de Transtorno de Asperger, demonst..
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  2. [deleted]Janina Neufeld, Mandy Roy, Antonia Zapf, Christopher Sinke, Hinderk M. Emrich, Vanessa Prox-Vagedes, Wolfgang Dillo & Markus Zedler (2013). Is Synaesthesia More Common in Patients with Asperger Syndrome? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:847.score: 24.0
    There is increasing evidence from case reports that synaesthesia is more common in individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC). Further, genes related to synaesthesia have also been found to be linked to ASC and, similar to synaesthetes, individuals with ASC show altered brain connectivity and unusual brain activation during sensory processing. However, up to now a systematic investigation of whether synaesthesia is more common in ASC patients is missing. The aim of the current pilot study was to test this hypothesis (...)
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  3. Assumpção Jr, Patricia Ribeiro Zukauskas & Nava Silton (2009). Temporality and Asperger's Syndrome. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 40 (1):85-106.score: 21.0
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  4. [deleted]Sandra Baez, Alexia Rattazzi, Maria Luz Gonzalez-Gadea, Teresa Torralva, Nora Vigliecca, Jean Decety, Facundo Manes & Agustin Ibanez (2012). Integrating Intention and Context: Assessing Social Cognition in Adults with Asperger Syndrome. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 21.0
  5. Uta Frith & Frederique de Vignemont (2005). Egocentrism, Allocentrism, and Asperger Syndrome. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):719-738.score: 18.0
    In this paper, we attempt to make a distinction between egocentrism and allocentrism in social cognition, based on the distinction that is made in visuo-spatial perception. We propose that it makes a difference to mentalizing whether the other person can be understood using an egocentric (‘‘you'') or an allocentric (‘‘he/ she/they'') stance. Within an egocentric stance, the other person is represented in relation to the self. By contrast, within an allocentric stance, the existence or mental state of the other person (...)
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  6. P. Walsh (2010). Asperger Syndrome and the Supposed Obligation Not to Bring Disabled Lives Into the World. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (9):521-524.score: 18.0
    Asperger syndrome (AS) is an autistic spectrum condition that shares the range of social impairments associated with classic autism widely regarded as disabling, while also often giving rise to high levels of ability in areas such as maths, science, engineering and music. The nature of this striking duality of disability and ability is examined, along with its implications for our thinking about disability and the relevance of levels and kinds of disability to reproductive choices. In particular, it may be (...)
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  7. Bérengère Guillery-Girard Laetitia Bon, Jean-Marc Baleyte, Pascale Piolino, Béatrice Desgranges, Francis Eustache (2012). Growing Up with Asperger's Syndrome: Developmental Trajectory of Autobiographical Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Autobiographical memory and social cognition share common properties and both are affected in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). So far, most of the scant research in ASD has concerned adults, systematically reporting impairment of the episodic component. The only study to be conducted with children concluded that they have poorer personal semantic knowledge than typical developing children. The present study explores the development of both components of autobiographical memory in an 8-year-old boy diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, based on three examinations (...)
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  8. Jyotsna Nair (2004). Knowing Me, Knowing You: Self-Awareness in Asperger's and Autism. In Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair (eds.), Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment. WW Norton & Co. 159-183.score: 17.0
     
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  9. Simon Baron-Cohen, D. Bor, J. Billington, J. Asher, S. Wheelwright & C. Ashwin (2007). Savant Memory in a Man with Colour Form-Number Synaesthesia and Asperger. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (s 9-10):237-251.score: 15.0
    Extreme conditions like savantism, autism or synaesthesia, which have a neurological 2AH, UK basis, challenge the idea that other minds are similar to our own. In this paper we report a single case study of a man in whom all three of these conditions co-occur. We suggest, on the basis of this single case, that when savantism and synaesthesia co- occur, it is worthwhile testing for an undiagnosed Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC). This is because savantism has an established association with (...)
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  10. D. Bowler, J. Gardiner & S. Gaigg (2007). Factors Affecting Conscious Awareness in the Recollective Experience of Adults with Asperger's Syndrome☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (1):124-143.score: 15.0
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  11. J. O'Brien & J. Spencer (2004). Perceptual Deficits in Autism and Asperger Syndrome: Form and Motion Processing. In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell Publishing. 33--28.score: 15.0
  12. [deleted]Clarke Adam, Barry Robert, Dupuy Franca, McCarthy Rory & Selikowitz Mark (2013). EEG Activity in Children with Asperger's Syndrome. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 15.0
  13. [deleted]Krause C. (2008). Brain Oscillatory Responses During an Auditory–Verbal Working Memory Task in Asperger Syndrome. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 15.0
  14. [deleted]Krause C. (2008). Effects of Working Memory Load in EEG Oscillatory Power in Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 15.0
  15. Reflections on Ian Hacking & Victoria Mcgeer (2010). The Clinical View Versus the Narrative View Individuals with Autism Are Very Much in the Public Eye. These Days, Anyone Versed in the Comings and Goings of Everyday Culture Will Have Heard of Autism (and/or Asperger Syndrome) 1—and Doubtless Knows Something About It. Misconceptions Also Abound. But Given That Autism. [REVIEW] In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 15.0
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  16. [deleted]Fielding Joanne (2012). Greater Disruption to the Control of Voluntary Saccades and Online Refinement of Saccade Accuracy in High-Functioning Autism Than Asperger's Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 15.0
  17. Therese Jolliffe & Simon Baron-Cohen (1999). A Test of Central Coherence Theory: Linguistic Processing in High-Functioning Adults with Autism or Asperger Syndrome: Is Local Coherence Impaired? Cognition 71 (2):149-185.score: 15.0
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  18. [deleted]Lepistö T. (2009). Cortical Discrimination of Speech Sounds in Children with Asperger Syndrome as Determined with the Multi-Feature Mismatch Negativity Paradigm. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 15.0
  19. S. Baron-Cohen (2002). Abelson. RP 185,195 Arbib, MA 57, 64,185,194 Armstrong, D. 33 Asperger, H. 186,191,194. In Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins. 45--265.score: 15.0
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  20. Baron-Cohen, Richler, Bisarya & Gurunathan & Wheelwright (2004). The Systemizing Quotient: An Investigation of Adults with Asperger Syndrome or High-Functioning Autism and Normal Sex Differences. In Uta Frith & Elisabeth Hill (eds.), Autism: Mind and Brain. Oup Oxford.score: 15.0
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  21. H. Ellis (1999). Asperger Syndrome: A Simple Matter of White Matter? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (5):192-200.score: 15.0
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  22. Therese Jolliffe & Simon Baron-Cohen (1999). Linguistic Processing in High-Functioning Adults with Autism or Asperger Syndrome: Can Local Coherence Be Achieved? A Test of Central Coherence Theory. Cognition 71:149-185.score: 15.0
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  23. Hippler & Klicpera (2004). A Retrospective Analysis of the Clinical Case Records of 'Autistic Psychopaths' Diagnosed by Hans Asperger and His Team at the University Children's Hospital, Vienna. In Uta Frith & Elisabeth Hill (eds.), Autism: Mind and Brain. Oup Oxford.score: 15.0
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  24. [deleted]Weisz Nathan (2011). Neuromagnetic Premotor Abnormalities in Children with Asperger Syndrome Compared to Control Children Correlate with Social Skills. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 15.0
  25. Simon Cushing (2013). Autism: The Very Idea. In Jami L. Anderson & Simon Cushing (eds.), The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman & Littlefield. 17-45.score: 9.0
    If each of the subtypes of autism is defined simply as constituted by a set of symptoms, then the criteria for its observation are straightforward, although, of course, some of those symptoms themselves might be hard to observe definitively. Compare with telling whether or not someone is bleeding: while it might be hard to tell if someone is bleeding internally, we know what it takes to find out, and when we have the right access and instruments we can settle the (...)
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  26. Jami L. Anderson (2013). A Dash of Autism. In Jami L. Anderson Simon Cushing (ed.), The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 6.0
    In this chapter, I describe my “post-diagnosis” experiences as the parent of an autistic child, those years in which I tried, but failed, to make sense of the overwhelming and often nonsensical information I received about autism. I argue that immediately after being given an autism diagnosis, parents are pressured into making what amounts to a life-long commitment to a therapy program that (they are told) will not only dramatically change their child, but their family’s financial situation and even their (...)
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  27. Jami L. Anderson & Simon Cushing (eds.) (2013). The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 6.0
    The Philosophy of Autism examines autism from the tradition of analytic philosophy, working from the premise that so-called autism spectrum disorders raise interesting philosophical questions that need to be and can be addressed in a manner that is clear, jargon-free, and accessible. The goal of the original essays in this book is to provide a philosophically rich analysis of issues raised by autism and to afford dignity and respect to those living with autism by placing it at the center of (...)
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  28. [deleted]Richard M. Lipkin Ning Qian (2011). A Learning-Style Theory for Understanding Autistic Behaviors. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 6.0
    Understanding autism’s ever-expanding array of behaviors, from sensation to cognition, is a major challenge. We posit that autistic and typically-developing brains implement different algorithms that are better suited to learn, represent, and process different tasks; consequently, they develop different interests and behaviors. Computationally, a continuum of algorithms exists, from lookup-table (LUT) learning, which aims to store experiences precisely, to interpolation (INT) learning, which focuses on extracting underlying statistical structure (regularities) from experiences. We hypothesize that autistic and typical brains, respectively, are (...)
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  29. Tiziana Zalla, Luca Barlassina, Marine Buon & Marion Leboyer (2011). Moral Judgment in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Cognition 121 (1):115-126.score: 3.0
    The ability of a group of adults with high functioning autism (HFA) or Asperger Syndrome (AS) to distinguish moral, conventional and disgust transgressions was investigated using a set of six transgression scenarios, each of which was followed by questions about permissibility, seriousness, authority contingency and justification. The results showed that although individuals with HFA or AS (HFA/AS) were able to distinguish affect-backed norms from conventional affect-neutral norms along the dimensions of permissibility, seriousness and authority-dependence, they failed to distinguish moral (...)
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  30. Ruth Sample (2013). Autism and the Extreme Male Brain. In Jami L. Anderson Simon Cushing (ed.), The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 3.0
    ABSTRACT: Simon Baron-Cohen has argued that autism and related developmental disorders (sometimes called “autism spectrum conditions” or “autism spectrum disorders”) can be usefully thought of as the condition of possessing an “extreme male brain.” The impetus for regarding autism spectrum disorders (ASD) this way has been the accepted science regarding the etiology of autism, as developed over that past several decades. Three important features of this etiology ground the Extreme Male Brain theory. First, ASD is disproportionately male (approximately 10:1 in (...)
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  31. Yasuhiko Murakami (2013). Affection of Contact and Transcendental Telepathy in Schizophrenia and Autism. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):179-194.score: 3.0
    This paper seeks to demonstrate the structural difference in communication of schizophrenia and autism. For a normal adult, spontaneous communication is nothing but the transmission of phantasía (thought) by means of perceptual objects or language. This transmission is first observed in a make-believe play of child. Husserl named this function “perceptual phantasía,” and this function presupposes as its basis the “internalized affection of contact” (which functions empirically in eye contact, body contact, or voice calling me). Regarding autism, because of the (...)
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  32. Tiziana Zalla & Marion Leboyer (2011). Judgment of Intentionality and Moral Evaluation in Individuals with High Functioning Autism. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (4):681-698.score: 3.0
    In this study, we investigated the relationships between judgments of intentionality and moral evaluation in individuals with High Functioning Autism (HFA) or Asperger Syndrome (AS). HFA or AS are neurodevelopmental disorders characterised by severe deficits in communication and social functioning. Impairments in Theory of Mind (ToM), i.e., the ability to attribute mental states to oneself and to others, are thought to be the core features of autism. Of all mental states, the concept of ‘intentional action’ is particularly important. People (...)
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  33. Henry Gans (2011). Reflections on the History and Ethics of the Proper Attribution and Misappropriation of Merit. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (4):470-478.score: 3.0
    The ethical conduct of research is central to the integrity of universities, where research and graduate education are inseparable.In the medical sciences, those who first describe a new feature, whether it's an anatomical structure, clinical sign or symptom, disease, physiological entity, or surgical procedure, often have their discoveries named after them. The insider knows what is meant by such eponymous, abstract designations as Padget's disease, the circle of Willis, Pavlov's dog, Asperger's syndrome, or the Papanicoulaou test. This kind of (...)
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  34. John Rossi, Craig Newschaffer & Michael Yudell (2013). Autism Spectrum Disorders, Risk Communication, and the Problem of Inadvertent Harm. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (2):105-138.score: 3.0
    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are an issue of growing public health significance. This set of neurodevelopmental disorders, which includes autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), is characterized by abnormalities in one or more of the following domains: language use, reciprocal social interactions, and/or a pattern of restricted interests or stereotyped behaviors. Prevalence estimates for ASDs have been increasing over the past few decades, with estimates at ~5/10,000 in the 1960s, and current estimates as (...)
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  35. Pier Jaarsma & Stellan Welin (2013). Human Capabilities, Mild Autism, Deafness and the Morality of Embryo Selection. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):817-824.score: 3.0
    A preimplantation genetic test to discriminate between severe and mild autism spectrum disorder might be developed in the foreseeable future. Recently, the philosophers Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane claimed that there are strong reasons for prospective parents to make use of such a test to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to autism or Asperger’s disorder. In this paper we will criticize this claim. We will discuss the morality of selection for mild autism in embryo selection in (...)
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  36. Morten L. Kringelbach Hans C. Lou, Morten Joensson (2011). Yoga Lessons for Consciousness Research: A Paralimbic Network Balancing Brain Resource Allocation. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 3.0
    Consciousness has been proposed to play a key role in shaping flexible learning and as such is thought to confer an evolutionary advantage. Attention and awareness are the perhaps most important underlying processes, yet their precise relationship is presently unclear. Both of these processes must, however, serve the evolutionary imperatives of survival and procreation. They are thus intimately bound by reward and emotion to help to prioritize efficient brain resource allocation in order to predict and optimize behaviour. Here we show (...)
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  37. Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair (2004). Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment. W.W.Norton.score: 2.0
  38. Victoria McGeer (2004). Autistic Self-Awareness: Comment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology. Special Issue 11 (3):235-251.score: 2.0
  39. Jay Lombard (2008). Synchrnoic Consciousness From a Neurological Point of View: The Philosophical Foundations for Neuroethics. Synthese 162 (3):439 - 450.score: 2.0
    Daniel Kolak’s theory of synchronic consciousness according to which the entire range of dissociative phenomena, from pathologies such as MPD and schizophrenia to normal dream states, are best explained in terms of consciousness becoming simultaneously identified as many selves, has revolutionary therapeutic implications for neurology and psychiatry. All these selves, according to Kolak—even the purely imaginary ones that exist as such only in our dreams—are not just conscious but also self-conscious, with beliefs, intentions, living lives informed by memories (confabulatory, in (...)
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