Search results for 'Associative Processes' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  22
    Marco Mazzone (2011). Schemata and Associative Processes in Pragmatics. Journal of Pragmatics 43 (8):2148-2159.
    The notion of schema has been given a major role by Recanati within his conception of primary pragmatic processes, conceived as a type of associative process. I intend to show that Recanati’s considerations on schemata may challenge the relevance theorist’s argument against associative explanations in pragmatics, and support an argument in favor of associative (versus inferential) explanations. More generally, associative relations can be shown to be schematic, that is, they have enough structure to license inferential (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2.  1
    E. L. Thorndike (1943). Some Complications of Associative Processes. Journal of Experimental Psychology 32 (6):501.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  1
    Endel Tulving & Donald M. Thomson (1971). Retrieval Processes in Recognition Memory: Effects of Associative Context. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):116.
  4. Colin Allen, Rational Versus Associative Processes.
    It is widely accepted that many species of non-human animals appear to engage in transitive inference, producing appropriate responses to novel pairings of non-adjacent members of an ordered series without previous experience of these pairings. Some researchers have taken this capability as providing direct evidence that these animals reason. Others resist such declarations, favouring instead explanations in terms of associative conditioning. Associative accounts of transitive inference have been refined in application to a simple five-element learning task that is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  10
    Carey K. Morewedge & Daniel Kahneman (2010). Associative Processes in Intuitive Judgment. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (10):435-440.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  6. Roger L. Mellgren & Mark W. Olson (1980). Associative Processes Controlling the Persistence of Operant Responding: S-S* and R-S. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 16 (4):279-282.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   26 citations  
  7.  8
    Bertram Gawronski & Galen V. Bodenhausen (2009). Operating Principles Versus Operating Conditions in the Distinction Between Associative and Propositional Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):207-208.
    Drawing on our Associative-Propositional Evaluation (APE) Model, we argue for the usefulness of distinguishing between basic operating principles of learning processes (associative linking vs. propositional reasoning) and secondary features pertaining to the conditions of their operation (automatic vs. controlled). We review empirical evidence that supports the joint operation of associative and propositional processes in the formation of new associations.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  3
    Andreas Voss, Klaus Rothermund, Anne Gast & Dirk Wentura (2013). Cognitive Processes in Associative and Categorical Priming: A Diffusion Model Analysis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (2):536.
  9.  1
    Alan W. Stacy, Susan L. Ames & J. Grenard (2006). Word Association Tests of Associative Memory and Implicit Processes: Theoretical and Assessment Issues. In Reinout W. Wiers & Alan W. Stacy (eds.), Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction. Sage Publications Ltd 75--90.
  10. Jeffrey A. Seybert, Mark A. Wilson & Alan L. Archer (1982). The Kamin Effect as a Function of Time of Training and Associative-Nonassociative Processes. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (4):227-230.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Pierre Perruchet & Annie Vinter (2002). The Self-Organizing Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):297-388.
    We propose that the isomorphism generally observed between the representations composing our momentary phenomenal experience and the structure of the world is the end-product of a progressive organization that emerges thanks to elementary associative processes that take our conscious representations themselves as the stuff on which they operate, a thesis that we summarize in the concept of Self-Organizing Consciousness (SOC). Key Words: Associative learning; automatism; consciousness; development; implicit learning; incubation; language; mental representation; perception; phenomenal experience.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  12.  15
    Philip S. Wong, Edward Bernat, Michael Snodgrass & Howard Shevrin (2004). Event-Related Brain Correlates of Associative Learning Without Awareness. International Journal of Psychophysiology 53 (3):217-231.
  13.  26
    Chris J. Mitchell, Jan De Houwer & Peter F. Lovibond (2009). The Propositional Nature of Human Associative Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):183-198.
    The past 50 years have seen an accumulation of evidence suggesting that associative learning depends on high-level cognitive processes that give rise to propositional knowledge. Yet, many learning theorists maintain a belief in a learning mechanism in which links between mental representations are formed automatically. We characterize and highlight the differences between the propositional and link approaches, and review the relevant empirical evidence. We conclude that learning is the consequence of propositional reasoning processes that cooperate with the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  14.  42
    Muriel Vandenberghe, Nicolas Schmidt, Patrick Fery & Axel Cleeremans (2006). Can Amnesic Patients Learn Without Awareness? New Evidence Comparing Deterministic and Probabilistic Sequence Learning. Neuropsychologia 44 (10):1629-1641.
    Can associative learning take place without awareness? We explore this issue in a sequence learning paradigm with amnesic and control participants, who were simply asked to react to one of four possible stimuli on each trial. Unknown to them, successive stimuli occurred in a sequence. We manipulated the extent to which stimuli followed the sequence in a deterministic manner (noiseless condition) or only probabilistically so (noisy condition). Through this paradigm, we aimed at addressing two central issues: first, we asked (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  20
    Anton Benz (2006). Partial Blocking and Associative Learning. Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (5):587 - 615.
    We are going to explain partial blocking as the result of diachronic processes based on what we will call associative learning. Especially, we argue that the task posed by partial blocking phenomena is to explain their emergence from unambiguous and fully expressive languages. This contrasts with approaches that presuppose underspecified semantic meanings or ineffability like Bidirectional Optimality Theory (Bi–OT) and some game theoretic explanations. We introduce a formal framework based on learning, speaker’s preferences and pure semantics for describing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Keith Frankish & Jonathan St B. T. Evans (eds.) (2009). In Two Minds: Dual Processes and Beyond. Oxford University Press.
    This book explores the idea that we have two minds - automatic, unconscious, and fast, the other controlled, conscious, and slow. In recent years there has been great interest in so-called dual-process theories of reasoning and rationality. According to such theories, there are two distinct systems underlying human reasoning - an evolutionarily old system that is associative, automatic, unconscious, parallel, and fast, and a more recent, distinctively human system that is rule-based, controlled, conscious, serial, and slow. Within the former, (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   40 citations  
  17.  1
    Glenn D. Reeder & John B. Pryor (2008). Dual Psychological Processes Underlying Public Stigma and the Implications for Reducing Stigma. Mens Sana Monographs 6 (1):175-186.
    People with serious illness or disability are often burdened with social stigma that promotes a cycle of poverty via unemployment, inadequate housing and threats to mental health. Stigma may be conceptualized in terms of self-stigma or public stigma . This article examines two psychological processes that underlie public stigma: associative processes and rule-based processes. Associative processes are quick and relatively automatic whereas rule-based processes take longer to manifest themselves and involve deliberate (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18. T. Lambert (2003). Visual Orienting, Learning and Conscious Awareness. In Luis Jimenez (ed.), Attention and Implicit Learning. John Benjamins
  19. Jan de Houwer (2006). Using the Implicit Association Test Does Not Rule Out an Impact of Conscious Propositional Knowledge on Evaluative Conditioning. Learning and Motivation 37 (2):176-187.
  20.  4
    John B. Pryor Glenn D. Reeder (2008). Dual Psychological Processes Underlying Public Stigma and the Implications for Reducing Stigma. Mens Sana Monographs 6 (1):175.
    _People with serious illness or disability are often burdened with social stigma that promotes a cycle of poverty via unemployment, inadequate housing and threats to mental health. Stigma may be conceptualized in terms of self-stigma (e.g., shame and lowered self-esteem) or public stigma (e.g., the general public's prejudice towards the stigmatized). This article examines two psychological processes that underlie public stigma: associative processes and rule-based processes. Associative processes are quick and relatively automatic whereas (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  13
    B. M. Spruijt (2001). How the Hierarchical Organization of the Brain and Increasing Cognitive Abilities May Result in Consciousness. Animal Welfare Supplement 10:77- 87.
  22.  1
    George Mandler & Shirley H. Heinemann (1956). Effect of Overlearning of a Verbal Response on Transfer of Training. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (1):39.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Staffan Sohlberg & Billy Jansson (2002). Unconscious Responses to "Mommy and I Are One": Does Gender Matter? In Robert F. Bornstein & Joseph M. Masling (eds.), The Psychodynamics of Gender and Gender Role. Empirical Studies in Psychoanalytic Theories, Vol. 10. American Psychological Association 165-201.
  24.  9
    Cilia Witteman & Andreas Glöckner (2011). Beyond Dual-Process Models: A Categorisation of Processes Underlying Intuitive Judgement and Decision Making. Thinking and Reasoning 16 (1):1-25.
    Intuitive-automatic processes are crucial for making judgements and decisions. The fascinating complexity of these processes has attracted many decision researchers, prompting them to start investigating intuition empirically and to develop numerous models. Dual-process models assume a clear distinction between intuitive and deliberate processes but provide no further differentiation within both categories. We go beyond these models and argue that intuition is not a homogeneous concept, but a label used for different cognitive mechanisms. We suggest that these mechanisms (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  25.  37
    Andreas Glöckner & Cilia Witteman (2010). Beyond Dual-Process Models: A Categorisation of Processes Underlying Intuitive Judgement and Decision Making. Thinking and Reasoning 16 (1):1 – 25.
    Intuitive-automatic processes are crucial for making judgements and decisions. The fascinating complexity of these processes has attracted many decision researchers, prompting them to start investigating intuition empirically and to develop numerous models. Dual-process models assume a clear distinction between intuitive and deliberate processes but provide no further differentiation within both categories. We go beyond these models and argue that intuition is not a homogeneous concept, but a label used for different cognitive mechanisms. We suggest that these mechanisms (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  26.  12
    Simona Ginsburg & Eva Jablonka (2007). The Transition to Experiencing: II. The Evolution of Associative Learning Based on Feelings. Biological Theory 2 (3):231-243.
    We discuss the evolutionary transition from animals with limited experiencing to animals with unlimited experiencing and basic consciousness. This transition was, we suggest, intimately linked with the evolution of associative learning and with flexible reward systems based on, and modifiable by, learning. During associative learning, new pathways relating stimuli and effects are formed within a highly integrated and continuously active nervous system. We argue that the memory traces left by such new stimulus-effect relations form dynamic, flexible, and varied (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  27.  5
    Marco Mazzone (2014). Crossing the Associative/Inferential Divide: Ad Hoc Concepts and the Inferential Power of Schemata. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (4):583-599.
    How do we construct ad hoc concepts, especially those characterised by emergent properties? A reasonable hypothesis, suggested both in psychology and in pragmatics , is that some sort of inferential processing must be involved. I argue that this inferential processing can be accounted for in associative terms. My argument is based on the notion of inference as associative pattern completion based on schemata, with schemata being conceived in turn as patterns of concepts and their relationships. The possible role (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  10
    Angelo Loula & Joao Queiroz, Synthetic Semiotics: On Modelling and Simulating the Emergence of Sign Processes.
    Based on formal-theoretical principles about the sign processes involved, we have built synthetic experiments to investigate the emergence of communication based on symbols and indexes in a distributed system of sign users, following theoretical constraints from C.S.Peirce theory of signs, following a Synthetic Semiotics approach. In this paper, we summarize these computational experiments and results regarding associative learning processes of symbolic sign modality and cognitive conditions in an evolutionary process for the emergence of either symbol-based or index-based (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  20
    Martin Redington (2002). Associative Learning: A Generalisation Too Far. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):351-352.
    I argue that Perruchet & Vinter's claim that representations are conscious, and processes unconscious, gives too much ground to the cognitive unconscious; and that the boundary between conscious and unconscious mental phenomena is unlikely to fall neatly along these lines. I also propose that in the absence of more detailed models that demonstrably provide a reasonable account of the data, claims that associative mechanisms may underlie all cognition are premature.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Tom Beesley, Fergal W. Jones & David R. Shanks (2012). Out of Control: An Associative Account of Congruency Effects in Sequence Learning. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):413-421.
    The demonstration of a sequential congruency effect in sequence learning has been offered as evidence for control processes that act to inhibit automatic response tendencies via unconscious conflict monitoring. Here we propose an alternative interpretation of this effect based on the associative learning of chains of sequenced contingencies. This account is supported by simulations with a Simple Recurrent Network, an associative model of sequence learning. We argue that the control- and associative-based accounts differ in their predictions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Robert Epstein (2008). Why Private Events Are Associative: Automatic Chaining and Associationism. Journal of Mind and Behavior 29 (3):269-282.
    That every response is also a stimulus has important implications for how we characterize the private experiences of both people and non-human animals. Acting as stimuli, responses, whether covert or overt, change the probability of subsequent responses. Hence, all behavior, covert and overt, is necessarily associative in some sense, and thinking may be characterized as “covert autochaining.” According to this view, animals capable of responding to temporally remote stimuli and to characteristics of their own bodies necessarily engage in some (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  10
    W. Robert Batsell Jr & Aaron G. Blankenship (2002). Beyond Potentiation: Synergistic Conditioning in Flavor-Aversion Learning. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):383-408.
    Taste-aversion learning has been a popular paradigm for examining associative processes because it often produces outcomes that are different from those observed in other classical conditioning paradigms. One such outcome is taste-mediated odor potentiation in which aversion conditioning with a weak odor and a strong taste results in increased or synergistic conditioning to the odor. Because this strengthened odor aversion was not anticipated by formal models of learning, investigation of taste-mediated odor potentiation was a hot topic in the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  9
    Batsell Jr & Aaron G. Blankenship (2002). Beyond Potentiation: Synergistic Conditioning in Flavor-Aversion Learning. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):383-408.
    Taste-aversion learning has been a popular paradigm for examining associative processes because it often produces outcomes that are different from those observed in other classical conditioning paradigms. One such outcome is taste-mediated odor potentiation in which aversion conditioning with a weak odor and a strong taste results in increased or synergistic conditioning to the odor. Because this strengthened odor aversion was not anticipated by formal models of learning, investigation of taste-mediated odor potentiation was a hot topic in the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  9
    W. Robert Batsell & Aaron G. Blankenship (2002). Beyond Potentiation: Synergistic Conditioning in Flavor-Aversion Learning. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):383-408.
    Taste-aversion learning has been a popular paradigm for examining associative processes because it often produces outcomes that are different from those observed in other classical conditioning paradigms. One such outcome is taste-mediated odor potentiation in which aversion conditioning with a weak odor and a strong taste results in increased or synergistic conditioning to the odor. Because this strengthened odor aversion was not anticipated by formal models of learning, investigation of taste-mediated odor potentiation was a hot topic in the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  70
    C. M. Heyes (1998). Theory of Mind in Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):101-114.
    Since the BBS article in which Premack and Woodruff (1978) asked “Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?,” it has been repeatedly claimed that there is observational and experimental evidence that apes have mental state concepts, such as “want” and “know.” Unlike research on the development of theory of mind in childhood, however, no substantial progress has been made through this work with nonhuman primates. A survey of empirical studies of imitation, self-recognition, social relationships, deception, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   54 citations  
  36.  23
    Aron K. Barbey & Steven A. Sloman (2007). Base-Rate Respect: From Ecological Rationality to Dual Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):241-254.
    The phenomenon of base-rate neglect has elicited much debate. One arena of debate concerns how people make judgments under conditions of uncertainty. Another more controversial arena concerns human rationality. In this target article, we attempt to unpack the perspectives in the literature on both kinds of issues and evaluate their ability to explain existing data and their conceptual coherence. From this evaluation we conclude that the best account of the data should be framed in terms of a dual-process model of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  37.  3
    Itamar Lerner, Shlomo Bentin & Oren Shriki (2014). Integrating the Automatic and the Controlled: Strategies in Semantic Priming in an Attractor Network With Latching Dynamics. Cognitive Science 38 (8):1562-1603.
    Semantic priming has long been recognized to reflect, along with automatic semantic mechanisms, the contribution of controlled strategies. However, previous theories of controlled priming were mostly qualitative, lacking common grounds with modern mathematical models of automatic priming based on neural networks. Recently, we introduced a novel attractor network model of automatic semantic priming with latching dynamics. Here, we extend this work to show how the same model can also account for important findings regarding controlled processes. Assuming the rate of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  7
    Jeffrey P. Toth, Brian Levine, Donald T. Stuss, Alfred Oh, Gordon Winocur & Nachshon Meiran (1995). Dissociation of Processes Underlying Spatial S-R Compatibility: Evidence for the Independent Influence of What and Where. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (4):483-501.
    The process-dissociation procedure was used to estimate the influence of spatial and form-based processing in the Simon task. Subjects made manual responses to the direction of arrows . The results provide evidence that the form and spatial location of a single stimulus can have functionally independent effects on performance. They also indicate the existence of two kinds of automaticity—an associative component that reflects prior S-R mappings and a nonassociative component that reflects the correspondence between stimulus and response codes.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  21
    David R. Shanks (2009). The Associative Nature of Human Associative Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):225-226.
    The extent to which human learning should be thought of in terms of elementary, automatic versus controlled, cognitive processes is unresolved after nearly a century of often fierce debate. Mitchell et al. provide a persuasive review of evidence against automatic, unconscious links. Indeed, unconscious processes seem to play a negligible role in any form of learning, not just in Pavlovian conditioning. But a modern connectionist framework, in which phenomena are emergent properties, is likely to offer a fuller account (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  9
    Marcus Munafo' (1997). Associative Learning and Pain? Why Stop There? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):459-460.
    It is argued by berkley that there are theoretical reasons why sex differences in pain may result from specific learning processes. I argue that Berkley has not gone far enough in pursuing this suggestion, and that the evidence that learning is a major determinant of pain behaviour is substantial. Moreover, sex differences in pain may represent only a special case of individual differences in pain resulting from learning processes.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Eric Mandelbaum (2015). Attitude, Inference, Association: On the Propositional Structure of Implicit Bias. Noûs 49 (3).
    The overwhelming majority of those who theorize about implicit biases posit that these biases are caused by some sort of association. However, what exactly this claim amounts to is rarely specified. In this paper, I distinguish between different understandings of association, and I argue that the crucial senses of association for elucidating implicit bias are the cognitive structure and mental process senses. A hypothesis is subsequently derived: if associations really underpin implicit biases, then implicit biases should be modulated by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  10
    Gary Hatfield (2014). Activity and Passivity in Theories of Perception: Descartes to Kant. In José Filipe Silva & Mikko Yrjönsuuri (eds.), Active Perception in the History of Philosophy: From Plato to Modern Philosophy. Springer 275–89.
    In the early modern period, many authors held that sensation or sensory reception is in some way passive and that perception is in some way active. The notion of a more passive and a more active aspect of perception is already present in Aristotle: the senses receive forms without matter more or less passively, but the “primary sense” also recognizes the salience of present objects. Ibn al-Haytham distinguished “pure sensation” from other aspects of sense perception, achieved by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Keith Frankish (2009). Systems and Levels: Dual-System Theories and the Personal-Subpersonal Distinction. In Jonathan Evans & Keith Frankish (eds.), In Two Minds: Dual Processes and Beyond. OUP Oxford
    About the book: This book explores the idea that we have two minds - automatic, unconscious, and fast, the other controlled, conscious, and slow. In recent years there has been great interest in so-called dual-process theories of reasoning and rationality. According to such theories, there are two distinct systems underlying human reasoning - an evolutionarily old system that is associative, automatic, unconscious, parallel, and fast, and a more recent, distinctively human system that is rule-based, controlled, conscious, serial, and slow. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  13
    Leyre Castro & Edward A. Wasserman (2009). Rats and Infants as Propositional Reasoners: A Plausible Possibility? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):203-204.
    Mitchell et al. contemplate the possibility of rats being capable of propositional reasoning. We suggest that this is an unlikely and unsubstantiated possibility. Nonhuman animals and human infants do learn about the contingencies in the world; however, such learning seems not to be based on propositional reasoning, but on more elementary associative processes.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  61
    Nigel J. T. Thomas, Coding Dualism: Conscious Thought Without Cartesianism or Computationalism.
    The principal temptation toward substance dualisms, or otherwise incorporating a question begging homunculus into our psychologies, arises not from the problem of consciousness in general, nor from the problem of intentionality, but from the question of our awareness and understanding of our own mental contents, and the control of the deliberate, conscious thinking in which we employ them. Dennett has called this "Hume's problem". Cognitivist philosophers have generally either denied the experiential reality of thought, as did the Behaviorists, or have (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  11
    Michael D. Barber (2012). The Cartesian Residue in Intersubjectivity and Child Development. Schutzian Research 4:91-110.
    This paper argues that Husserl’s account of adult recognition of another allows for immediate, noninferential, analogical access to the other, though onedoes not experience the other’s experience as s/he does. The passive-associative processes at work in adult recognition of another make possible infant syncretic sociability and play a role in constituting the infant’s self prior to reflection. The reflective perspective of the psychologist and philosopher discovers that such infant experiences, though at first seeming indistinguishable from their parents’ experience, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  26
    Axel Cleeremans, Incremental Sequence Learning.
    As linguistic competence so clearly illustrates, processing sequences of events is a fundamental aspect of human cognition. For this reason perhaps, sequence learning behavior currently attracts considerable attention in both cognitive psychology and computational theory. In typical sequence learning situations, participants are asked to react to each element of sequentially structured visual sequences of events. An important issue in this context is to determine whether essentially associative processes are sufficient to understand human performance, or whether more powerful learning (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  2
    Amos Schurr & Ido Erev (2007). The Effect of Base Rate, Careful Analysis, and the Distinction Between Decisions From Experience and From Description. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):281-281.
    Barbey & Sloman (B&S) attribute base-rate neglect to associative processes (like retrieval from memory) that fail to adequately represent the set structure of the problem. This commentary notes that associative responses can also lead to base-rate overweighting. We suggest that the difference between the two patterns is related to the distinction between decisions from experience and decisions from description.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Anik Waldow (2010). Triggers of Thought: Impressions Within Hume’s Theory of Mind. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 13.
    This essay argues that Humean impressions are triggers of associative processes, which enable us to form stable patterns of thought that co-vary with our experiences of the world. It will thus challenge the importance of the Copy Principle by claiming that it is the regularity with which certain kinds of sensory inputs motivate certain sets of complex ideas that matters for the discrimination of ideas. This reading is conducive to Hume’s account of perception, because it avoids the impoverishment (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Keith Frankish (2010). Dual-Process and Dual-System Theories of Reasoning. Philosophy Compass 5 (10):914-926.
    Dual-process theories hold that there are two distinct processing modes available for many cognitive tasks: one that is fast, automatic and non-conscious, and another that is slow, controlled and conscious. Typically, cognitive biases are attributed to type 1 processes, which are held to be heuristic or associative, and logical responses to type 2 processes, which are characterised as rule-based or analytical. Dual-system theories go further and assign these two types of process to two separate reasoning systems, System (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000