Search results for 'Astrology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Terence Rajivan Edward (2016). Astrology, Fate and Causation. Philosophical Pathways (200).
    Some philosophers assert that astrology is a false theory. The simplest way to argue against all astrology is to identify a proposition that any kind of astrology must be committed to and then show that this proposition is false. In this paper I draw attention to some misconceptions about which propositions are essential to astrology.
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  2. Geoffrey O. Dean & Ivan W. Kelly (2003). Is Astrology Relevant to Consciousness and Psi? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (6):175-198.
    Abstract: Many astrologers attribute a successful birth-chart reading to what they call intuition or psychic ability,where the birth chart acts like a crystal ball. As in shamanism,they relate consciousness to a transcendent reality that,if true, might require are-assessment of present biological theories of consciousness.In Western countries roughly 1 person in 10,000 is practising or seriously studying astrology, so their total number is substantial. Many tests of astrologers have been made since the 1950s but only recently has a coherent review (...)
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  3.  28
    Glen M. Cooper (2011). Galen and Astrology: A Mésalliance? Early Science and Medicine 16 (2):120-146.
    The author examines the question of Galen's affinity with astrology, in view of Galen's extended astrological discussion in the De diebus decretoriis . The critical passages from Galen are examined, and shown to be superficial in understanding. The author performs a lexical sounding of Galen's corpus, using key terms with astrological valences drawn from the Critical Days, and assesses their absence in Galen's other works. He compares Galen's astrology with the astrology of Ptolemy's Tetrabiblos, and evaluates their (...)
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  4.  36
    Marilynn Lawrence, Hellenistic Astrology. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  5. Martin Davis (1999). Astrolocality Astrology a Guide to What It is and How to Use It.
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  6. Michel Gauquelin (1969). The Cosmic Clocks: From Astrology to a Modern Science. London, Owen.
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  7. Joe Landwehr (2007). Tracking the Soul: With an Astrology of Consciousness. Ancient Tower Press.
     
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  8. John Lynch (1962). The Coffee Table Book of Astrology. New York, Viking Press.
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  9. Paul R. Thagard (1978). Why Astrology is a Pseudoscience. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1978:223 - 234.
    Using astrology as a case study, this paper attempts to establish a criterion for demarcating science from pseudoscience. Numerous reasons for considering astrology to be a pseudoscience are evaluated and rejected; verifiability and falsifiability are briefly discussed. A theory is said to be pseudoscientific if and only if (1) it has been less progressive than alternative theories over a long period of time, and faces many unsolved problems, but (2) the community of practitioners makes little attempt to develop (...)
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  10.  22
    Ann Moyer (1999). The Astronomers' Game: Astrology and University Culture in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries. Early Science and Medicine 4 (3):228-250.
    The formal study of both astronomy and astrology in later medieval Europe was firmly based in the universities. Instruction in astrology is attested by the presence of an educational board game, known as the ludus astronomorum, in several university-related miscellanies of fifteenth-century English provenance. William Fulke also published an edition of the game a century later , which is attested in a number of Elizabethan libraries. The game serves to rehearse for its players the celestial motions and astrological (...)
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  11.  16
    N. M. Swerdlow (2013). On Professor Westman's Reply to Copernicus and Astrology, with an Appendix of Translations of Additional Primary Sources. Perspectives on Science 21 (3):384-385.
    Professor Westman’s reply need be considered only briefly. When I received for review The Copernican Question, Prognostication, Skepticism, and Celestial Order, with its superlative commendations, I believed I had in my hands a book of surpassing erudition, the culmination of more than forty years of study by one of the world’s greatest experts on Copernicus and the astronomy and astrology of the Renaissance and early modern period. Imagine my surprise as I read this vast tome and discovered that it (...)
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  12.  40
    H. Darrel Rutkin (2010). Mysteries of Attraction: Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola, Astrology and Desire. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (2):117-124.
    Although in his later years Giovanni Pico della Mirandola vehemently rejected astrology, he earlier used it in a variety of ways, but primarily to provide further evidence for positions to which he had arrived by other means. One such early use appears in his commentary on his friend Girolamo Benivieni’s love poetry, the Canzone d’amore, of 1486–1487. In the passages discussed here, Pico presents an intensive Platonic natural philosophical analysis based on a deep astrologically informed understanding of human nature (...)
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  13.  5
    Richard Dunn (1994). The True Place of Astrology Among the Mathematical Arts of Late Tudor England. Annals of Science 51 (2):151-163.
    Sixteenth-century astrology was considered by its practitioners to be allied to a wide range of disciplines, including medicine, the magical arts and the mathematical arts. The last of these associations was particularly important, since it formed a cornerstone of the legitimation of the celestial art. Astrologers in late Tudor England sought to show, therefore, that astrology shared the characteristics of the increasingly strong and well-defined domain of the mathematical arts, and that it was an important ally of many (...)
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  14.  15
    Charles Burnett (2002). The Certitude of Astrology: The Scientific Methodology of Al-Qabīsī and Abu MaShar1. Early Science and Medicine 7 (3):198-213.
    Abū Ma'shar and al-Qābīsī were active astrologers and defenders of the scientific character of their discipline. They wrote works on criticisms brought forward against the discipline and challenged practitioners whom they considered as detrimental for the esteem and future fate of their science. Nevertheless, both writers can be seen as heirs to a single tradition of thought, which took its origins in Ptolemy's Tetrabiblios and developed largely independently of the religious or philosophical beliefs of a specific community. The arguments developed (...)
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  15.  16
    D. Lehoux (2004). Observation and Prediction in Ancient Astrology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):227-246.
    What is the relationship between observations, predictions, texts, and instruments in ancient astrology? By distinguishing between two distinct kinds of observation claim in astrological texts, I show on the one hand the rhetorical and theoretical importance of each kind of observation claim to ancient astrological traditions, and on the other hand how practices of ancient astrology break from observation once astronomical phenomena become reliably predictable. We thus see a shift in practice from observationally derived predictions to a reliance (...)
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  16.  8
    B. I. Pruzhinin (1995). Astrology. Russian Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):78-96.
    A half century of intensive educational propaganda has finally had its fitting effect: astrological notions are being assimilated these days in our country with striking ease and moreover above all by educated, so to speak enlightened, people. It has become good tone to listen on every occasion to the forecasts of fashionable astrologers, to interview them, and to print computer horoscopes. The traditional skepticism of our scientists barely suffices them to keep their own scientific view of the world intact. But (...)
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  17.  6
    Charles Burnett (1998). King Ptolemy and Alchandreus the Philosopher: The Earliest Texts on the Astrolabe and Arabic Astrology at Fleury, Micy and Chartres. Annals of Science 55 (4):329-368.
    This paper reassesses the importance of the Benedictine monasteries of St Benoît of Fleury and St Mesmin of Micy , and the Cathedral of Chartres for the early diffusion of Arabic learning concerning the astrolabe, and it relates this diffusion to that of the judicial astrology of ‘Alchandreus philosophus’ and the astronomical tables of the Preceptum canonis Ptolomei. Evidence is given for the fact that already, by the turn of the millennium, the elements were in place for a corpus (...)
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  18.  6
    P. Adamson (2002). Abū Ma'šar, Al-Kindī and the Philosophical Defense of Astrology. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 69 (2):245-270.
    This paper explores the philosophical aspects of the "Great Introduction" of Abū Ma'šar, one of the great figures of Arabic astrology and an associate of al-Kindī, the great 9th century philosopher. I argue that the following points of philosophical interest may be found in this text: 1. Astrology is described as a "master science" along the lines proposed by Aristotle, i.e. it provides principles for lower sciences. Also he supplies arguments to ground astrology on methodological grounds, such (...)
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  19.  6
    Martin Gansten & Ola Wikander (2011). Sahl and the Tājika Yogas: Indian Transformations of Arabic Astrology. Annals of Science 68 (4):531-546.
    Summary This paper offers a positive identification of Sahl ibn Bishr's Kit?b al-? a?k?m ?al? ?n-ni?ba al-falakiyya as the Arabic source text for what is perhaps the most characteristic feature of the medieval Perso-Indian style of astrology known as t?jika: the sixteen yogas or types of planetary configurations. The dependence of two late sixteenth-century t?jika works in Sanskrit ? N?laka??ha's T?jikan?laka??h? and Ga?e?a's T?jikabh??a?a ? on Sahl, presumably through one or more intermediary texts, is demonstrated by a comparison of (...)
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  20.  13
    R. J. Getty (1941). The Astrology of P. Nigidius Figulus (Lucan I, 649–65). Classical Quarterly 35 (1-2):17-.
    No sooner had Pompey and the Senate fled in terror from Rome before Caesar's approach than the fears of those who remained in the city were heightened by new portents. The Etruscan soothsayer, Arruns, who was called in by the frightened townspeople to discover the will of the gods, proceeded to give such instructions as might be expected from one of his profession, and then, on sacrificing a bull, found that the omens were unfavourable. As if this were not enough, (...)
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  21.  11
    Hilary M. Carey (2010). Judicial Astrology in Theory and Practice in Later Medieval Europe. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (2):90-98.
    Interrogations and elections were two branches of Arabic judicial astrology made available in Latin translation to readers in western Europe from the twelfth century. Through an analysis of the theory and practice of interrogations and elections, including the writing of the Jewish astrologer Sahl b. Bishr, this essay considers the extent to which judicial astrology was practiced in the medieval west. Consideration is given to historical examples of interrogations and elections mostly from late medieval English manuscripts. These include (...)
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  22.  7
    Laura Ackerman Smoller (2010). Teste Albumasare Cum Sibylla: Astrology and the Sibyls in Medieval Europe. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (2):76-89.
    In the 1480s Dominican humanist Filippo de’ Barbieri published an illustration of a supposedly ancient female seer called the ‘Sybilla Chimica’, whose prophetic text repeated the words of the ninth-century astrologer Abu Ma‘shar. In tracing the origins of Barbieri’s astrological Sibyl, this article examines three sometimes interlocking traditions: the attribution of an ante-diluvian history to the science of the stars, the assertion of astrology’s origins in divine revelation, and the belief in the ancient Sibyls’ predictions of the birth of (...)
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  23.  1
    F. R. Jevons (1964). Paracelsus's Two-Way Astrology: II. Man's Relation to the Stars. British Journal for the History of Science 2 (2):148-155.
    The preceding paper described how all-pervasive was the influence that Paracelsus designated ‘astral’. In what sense, then, is it true that he placed restrictions, on astrological powers? The restriction applies to the more limited and usual sense of astrology, referring to the control of events on earth by the stars in the sky. Paracelsus was not prepared to hand over our fates entirely to a distant autocracy of the stars quite beyond our control.
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  24.  6
    Claudia Brosseder (2010). Astrology in Seventeenth-Century Peru. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (2):146-157.
    This article discusses three aspects of the history of astrology in seventeenth-century Peru that are of larger interest for the history of science in Latin America: Creole concerns about indigenous idolatry, the impact of the Inquisition on natural philosophy, and communication between scholars within the Spanish colonies and the transatlantic world. Drawing mainly on the scholars Antonio de la Calancha, Juan de Figueroa, and Ruiz de Lozano, along with several Jesuits, the article analyzes how natural and medical astrology (...)
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  25.  3
    Charles Burnett (2010). Hebrew and Latin Astrology in the Twelfth Century: The Example of the Location of Pain. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (2):70-75.
    The formative period of Latin and Hebrew astrology occurred virtually simultaneously in both cultures. In the second quarter of the twelfth century the terminology of the subject was established and the textbooks which became authoritative were written. The responsibility for this lay almost entirely with two scholars: John of Seville for the Latins, and Abraham ibn Ezra for the Jews. It is unlikely to have been by coincidence that the same developments in astrology occurred in these two cultures. (...)
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  26.  3
    Jean-Patrice Boudet (2010). A 'College of Astrology and Medicine'? Charles V, Gervais Chrétien, and the Scientific Manuscripts of Maître Gervais's College. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (2):99-108.
    Considered an institution mainly devoted to astrology and medicine by Simon de Phares and by some historians who believe that he was reliable, the college founded in 1371 by Charles V’s first physician, Gervais Chrétien, was in fact primarily dedicated to theological students. It was not before 1377 that there were created there two bursaries for scholares regis, specialising in ‘licit mathematical sciences’, and two medical fellowships. Yet the influence of the activity of these fellows seems to have been (...)
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  27. Charles Burnett (ed.) (1999). Abū Ma‘Šar on Historical Astrology: The Book of Religions and Dynasties : Volume I: The Arabic Original: Abū Ma‘Šar, K. Al-Milal Wa D-Duwal . Arabic Text Edited by Keiji Yamamoto, with an English Translation by Keiji Yamamoto and Charles Burnett. Volume Ii: The Latin Versions: Albumas. [REVIEW] Brill.
    These volumes provide the Arabic, Latin and English versions of the major text on political astrology of the Middle Ages, generally attributed to Abū Ma‘šar , with a commentary and Latin-Arabic and Arabic-Latin glossaries.
     
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  28. Paul Colilli (2015). Agamben and the Signature of Astrology: Spheres of Potentiality. Lexington Books.
    This book opens a new chapter in Agamben studies by providing a critical account of how the ancient science of astrology emerges in contemporary thought through the work of Giorgio Agamben. Astrology becomes a means to visualize the significance of the central elements in Agamben’s thinking on issues such as potentiality, biopolitics, bare life and the signature. In the end, the astrological signature becomes an alternative mode to theology, politics and philosophy as a way of understanding history.
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  29. Brendan Dooley (ed.) (2014). A Companion to Astrology in the Renaissance. Brill.
    Brill’s Companion to Renaissance Astrology brings together a wide array of expertise from around the globe to explain the method and matter of this unique cultural form, summarizing the current state of research and suggesting new paths.
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  30. F. R. Jevons (1964). Paracelsus's Two-Way Astrology: I. What Paracelsus Meant by ‘Stars’. British Journal for the History of Science 2 (2):139-147.
    References to the stars permeate the writings of Paracelsus ; yet modern authorities comment on the way he restricted astrological influence. The contradiction is only apparent, and disappears when the significance he attached to the relevant vocabulary is understood. He had in mind a kind of influence rather different from that usually thought of in connection with astrology, and the astrological jargon he bandied about had a metaphorical more often than a literal meaning. In his major works, signs of (...)
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  31. O. P. Faracovi, D. Trierweiler & J. C. Gage (1998). Praise of Astrology. Diogenes 46 (182):109-121.
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  32.  5
    Ian James Kidd (2016). Why Did Feyerabend Defend Astrology? Integrity, Virtue, and the Authority of Science. Social Epistemology 30 (4):464-482.
    This paper explores the relationship between epistemic integrity, virtue, and authority by offering a virtue epistemological reading of the defences of non-scientific beliefs, practices, and traditions in the writings of Paul Feyerabend. I argue that there was a robust epistemic rationale for those defences and that it can inform contemporary reflection on the epistemic authority of the sciences. Two common explanations of the purpose of those defences are rejected as lacking textual support. A third “pluralist” reading is judged more persuasive, (...)
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  33. F. Chenet (1985). Karma and Astrology: An Unrecognized Aspect of Indian Anthropology. Diogenes 33 (129):101-126.
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  34. Moriz Sondheim (1939). Shakespeare and the Astrology of His Time. Journal of the Warburg Institute 2 (3):243-259.
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  35.  18
    Russell Kahl (1954). Astrology and Alchemy; Two Fossil Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 51 (8):252-254.
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  36.  78
    J. Maitre & C. Becker (1966). The Consumption of Astrology in Contemporary Society. Diogenes 14 (53):82-98.
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  37.  14
    N. M. Swerdlow (2012). Copernicus and Astrology, with an Appendix1of Translations of Primary Sources. Perspectives on Science 20 (3):353-378.
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  38.  5
    Ian James Kidd (2016). Why Did Feyerabend Defend Astrology? Integrity, Virtue, and the Authority of Science. Social Epistemology 30 (4):464-482.
    This paper explores the relationship between epistemic integrity, virtue, and authority by offering a virtue epistemological reading of the defences of non-scientific beliefs, practices, and traditions in the writings of Paul Feyerabend. I argue that there was arobust epistemic rationale for those defences and that it can inform contemporaryreflection on the epistemic authority of the sciences. Two common explanations of the purpose of those defences are rejected as lacking textual support. A third "pluralist" reading is judged more persuasive, but found (...)
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  39.  27
    Rhonda Martens (2014). Patrick J. Boner Kepler’s Cosmological Synthesis: Astrology, Mechanism and the Soul , Pp. 204, € 101, $138, ISBN 978 90 04 24608 9. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 19 (2):197-199.
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  40.  40
    Monica Azzolini (2010). The Political Uses of Astrology: Predicting the Illness and Death of Princes, Kings and Popes in the Italian Renaissance. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (2):135-145.
    This paper examines the production and circulation of astrological prognostications regarding the illness and death of kings, princes, and popes in the Italian Renaissance . The distribution and consumption of this type of astrological information was often closely linked to the specific political situation in which they were produced. Depending on the astrological techniques used , and the media in which they appeared these prognostications fulfilled different functions in the information economy of Renaissance Italy. Some were used to legitimise the (...)
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  41.  6
    Gábor Almási (2013). Tycho Brahe and the Separation of Astronomy From Astrology: The Making of a New Scientific Discourse. Science in Context 26 (1):3-30.
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  42. Anthony A. Long (1982). Astrology: Arguments Pro and Contra. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), Science and Speculation: Studies in Hellenistic Theory and Practice. Editions de la Maison des Sciences de L'homme 165--92.
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  43.  8
    Abraham Ibn Ezra (1996). Astronomy and Astrology in the Works Of. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 6:9-21.
  44.  6
    Lynn Thorndike (1955). The True Place of Astrology in the History of Science. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 46:273-278.
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  45.  2
    Laura Ackerman Smoller (2007). Astrology and the Sibyls: John of Legnano's De Adventu Christi and the Natural Theology of the Later Middle Ages. Science in Context 20 (3):423.
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  46. Sheila J. Rabin (2008). Pico on Magic and Astrology. In M. V. Dougherty (ed.), Pico Della Mirandola: New Essays. Cambridge University Press
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  47. Julio Samso (2009). Ibn Abi L-Rijal's Urjuza and Ibn Qunfudh's Commentary: Astrology and History in the Maghrib During the 11 (Th) and 14 (Th) Centuries (and II). [REVIEW] Al-Qantara: Revista de Estudios Árabes 30 (2):321 - 360.
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  48. Paul Thagard (1998). Why Astrology is Not Science. In Martin Curd & Jan Cover (eds.), Philosophy of Science: The Central Issues. Norton
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  49. William R. Newman & Anthony Grafton (2003). Secrets of Nature. Astrology and Alchemy in Early Modern Europe. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 65 (1):144-145.
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  50.  15
    Elizabeth Lane Furdell (2008). English Almanacs, Astrology and Popular Medicine: 1550-1700. Early Science and Medicine 13 (4):401-402.
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