Search results for 'Astronomy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  3
    What'S. New In Kepler'S. & New Astronomy (1993). Bernard Goldstein, University of Pittsburgh (Religious Studies and History and History and Philosophy of Science). Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 24:203-204.
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  2. Expanding Horizons & In Astronomy (2001). Martin Rees. In A. Koj & Piotr Sztompka (eds.), Images of the World: Science, Humanities, Art. Jagiellonian University 55.
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  3.  26
    Florence C. Hsia (2008). Chinese Astronomy for the Early Modern European Reader. Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):417-450.
    Around 1716, the French astronomer and academician Joseph-Nicolas Delisle took up a new project: the twinned topics of Chinese chronology and astronomy. Unable to access Chinese sources and not knowing any fellow savants who shared this particular interest, Delisle methodically made extracts and compiled data from the existing European literature. Among Delisle's papers at the Observatoire de Paris still exist the results of this research, including a list of the books he found relevant. This paper develops a close reading (...)
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  4.  12
    Damien Janos (2010). Al-Fārābī on the Method of Astronomy. Early Science and Medicine 15 (3):237-265.
    This article analyzes al-Fārābī's conception of the astronomical method by examining rarely studied texts such as the K. al-mūsīqā and K. al-burhān and by addressing key issues such as the subject matter of astronomy, the techniques used to derive the first principles of this science, the relation between astrology, astronomy, physics, and metaphysics, and the place of al-Fārābī in the Arabic astronomical tradition. The analysis indicates that al-Fārābī's theories combine material from the Greek astronomical tradition, especially Geminus, as (...)
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  5.  2
    Javiera Barandiaran (2015). Reaching for the Stars? Astronomy and Growth in Chile. Minerva 53 (2):141-164.
    While scholars and policy practitioners often advocate for science and technology transfer as a motor for economic growth, many in Latin America have long warned of the pitfalls of such top-down, North-South transfers. To many in Latin America, scientific aid or cooperation from the North has often reproduced hierarchies that perpetuate dependency. Large astronomy observatories located in Chile – with a high price tag, cutting-edge technology, and seen to answer seemingly arcane research questions – seem ripe for reproducing precisely (...)
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  6. Erik Brogt (2007). Astronomy Education: Becoming a Hybrid Researcher. Journal of Research Practice 3 (1):Article M2.
    This article describes the experiences of a former astronomer who is making the transition to astronomy education research as an international graduate student in the United States. The article describes the author’s encounters with education research, its methodologies, and his changing research interests as he progresses through the graduate program. It also describes his experiences with the busy life of a graduate student in American academia and his experiences as an international student.
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  7.  6
    J. L. Heilbron (ed.) (2005). The Oxford Guide to the History of Physics and Astronomy. Oxford University Press.
    With over 150 alphabetically arranged entries about key scientists, concepts, discoveries, technological innovations, and learned institutions, the Oxford Guide to Physics and Astronomy traces the history of physics and astronomy from the Renaissance to the present. For students, teachers, historians, scientists, and readers of popular science books such as Galileo's Daughter, this guide deciphers the methods and philosophies of physics and astronomy as well as the historical periods from which they emerged. Meant to serve the lay reader (...)
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  8.  36
    Thomas S. Kuhn (1957). The Copernican Revolution: Planetary Astronomy in the Development of Western Thought. Harvard University Press.
    The significance of the plurality of the Copernican Revolution is the main thrust of this undergraduate text In this study of the Copernican Revolution, the ...
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  9. Aaron Adair (2012). The Star of Christ in the Light of Astronomy. Zygon 47 (1):7-29.
    Abstract Centuries of both theologians and astronomers have wondered what the Star of Bethlehem (Matt 2:2, 9) actually was, from miracle to planetary conjunction. Here a history of this search is presented, along with the difficulties the various proposals have had. The natural theories of the Star are found to be a recent innovation, and now almost exclusively maintained by scientists rather than theologians. Current problems with various theories are recognized, as well as general problems with the approach. The interactions (...)
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  10. F. Zwicky (1957). Morphological Astronomy. Springer-Verlag.
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  11. Charles Hutton, J. Davis, Johnson & G. G. Robinson (1796). A Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary Containing an Explanation of the Terms, and an Account of the Several Subjects, Comprized Under the Heads Mathematics, Astronomy, and Philosophy Both Natural and Experimental: With an Historical Account of the Rise, Progress, and Present State of These Sciences: Also Memoirs of the Lives and Writings of the Most Eminent Authors, Both Ancient and Modern, Who by Their Discoveries or Improvements Have Contributed to the Advance of Them. In Two Volumes. With Many Cuts and Copper Plates. Printed by J. Davis, for J. Johnson, in St. Paul's Church-Yard; and G. G. And J. Robinson, in Paternoster-Row.
     
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  12. K. V. Krishnamurthy (ed.) (2006). National Seminar on "Vedic Astronomy & Cosmology": 10-11th December 2006. I-S.E.R.V.E (Institute of Scientific Research on Vedas).
     
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  13.  20
    Horacio Tignanelli & Yann Benétreau-Dupin (2014). Perspectives of History and Philosophy on Teaching Astronomy. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 603-640.
    The didactics of astronomy is a relatively young field with respect to that of other sciences. Historical issues have most often been part of the teaching of astronomy, although that often does not stem from a specific didactics. The teaching of astronomy is often subsumed under that of physics. One can easily consider that, from an educational standpoint, astronomy requires the same mathematical or physical strategies. This approach may be adequate in many cases but cannot stand (...)
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  14.  35
    Peter Barker & Bernard R. Goldstein (1998). Realism and Instrumentalism in Sixteenth Century Astronomy: A Reappraisal. Perspectives on Science 6 (3):232-258.
    : We question the claim, common since Duhem, that sixteenth century astronomy, and especially the Wittenberg interpretation of Copernicus, was instrumentalistic rather than realistic. We identify a previously unrecognized Wittenberg astronomer, Edo Hildericus (Hilderich von Varel), who presents a detailed exposition of Copernicus's cosmology that is incompatible with instrumentalism. Quotations from other sixteenth century astronomers show that knowledge of the real configuration of the heavens was unattainable practically, rather than in principle. Astronomy was limited to quia demonstrations, although (...)
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  15.  73
    Dudley Shapere (1993). Astronomy and Antirealism. Philosophy of Science 60 (1):134-150.
    Relying on an analysis of the case of gravitational lensing, Hacking argues for a "modest antirealism" in astronomy. It is shown here that neither his scientific arguments nor his philosophical doctrines imply an antirealist conclusion. An alternative, realistic interpretation of gravitational lensing, and of the nature and history of astronomy more generally, is suggested.
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  16.  9
    Michael Shank (2009). Setting Up Copernicus? Astronomy and Natural Philosophy in Giambattista Capuano da Manfredonia's Expositio on the Sphere. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):290-315.
    In 1499, while Copernicus studies in Bologna, the commentary on Sacrobosco's Sphere by the Padua master Francesco Capuano da Manfredonia first appears in print. It will be revised and reprinted several times thereafter. Like Copernicus, Capuano has a high view of astronomy and mingles astronomical and physical considerations . Also, Capuano offers a flawed argument against a two-fold motion of the Earth. Multiple thematic resonances between Capuano's commentary and De revolutionibus, I, 5-11, suggest the hypothesis that Copernicus is answering (...)
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  17.  18
    Ulrich Gähde (2012). Anomalies and Coherence: A Case Study From Astronomy. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 43 (2):347-359.
    In recent decades, the concept of coherence has become one of the key concepts in philosophy. Although there is still no consensus about how to explicate coherence, it is widely accepted that the appearance of anomalies significantly lowers the coherence of a propositional or belief system. In this paper, the relationship between coherence and anomalies is analysed by looking at a specific case study from astronomy. It concerns anomalies that occurred in the first half of the twentieth century during (...)
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  18. Robert B. Todd & Alan C. Bowen (eds.) (2004). Cleomedes' Lectures on Astronomy: A Translation of the Heavens. University of California Press.
    At some time around 200 A.D., the Stoic philosopher and teacher Cleomedes delivered a set of lectures on elementary astronomy as part of a complete introduction to Stoicism for his students. The result was _The Heavens, _the only work by a professional Stoic teacher to survive intact from the first two centuries A.D., and a rare example of the interaction between science and philosophy in late antiquity. This volume contains a clear and idiomatic English translation—the first ever—of _The Heavens, (...)
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  19.  26
    Alan C. Bowen (2007). The Demarcation of Physical Theory and Astronomy by Geminus and Ptolemy. Perspectives on Science 15 (3):327-358.
    : The Hellenistic reception of Babylonian horoscopic astrology gave rise to the question of what the planets really do and whether astrology is a science. This question in turn became one of defining the Greco-Latin science of astronomy, a project that took Aristotle's views as a starting-point. Thus, I concentrate on one aspect of the various definitions of astronomy proposed in Hellenistic times, their demarcation of astronomy and physical theory. I explicate the account offered by Geminus and (...)
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  20.  6
    Rhonda Martens (2000). Kepler's Philosophy and the New Astronomy. Princeton University Press.
    Here, Rhonda Martens offers the first extended study of Kepler's philosophical views and shows how those views helped him construct and justify the new astronomy.
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  21.  10
    J. M. Steele (2011). Visual Aspects of the Transmission of Babylonian Astronomy and its Reception Into Greek Astronomy. Annals of Science 68 (4):453-465.
    Summary Evidence for the transmission of Babylonian astronomy into the Greco-Roman world is well attested in the form of observations, numerical parameters and astronomical tables. This paper investigates the reception of Babylonian astronomy in the Greco-Roman world and in particular the transmission, transformation and exploitation of the layout of texts and other visual information. Two examples illustrate this process: the use of Babylonian lunar eclipse records by Greek astronomers and the adaptation of Babylonian methods of eclipse prediction in (...)
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  22.  28
    Stojan Obradović & Slobodan Ninković (2009). The Heuristic Function of Mathematics in Physics and Astronomy. Foundations of Science 14 (4):351-360.
    This paper considers the role of mathematics in the process of acquiring new knowledge in physics and astronomy. The defining of the notions of continuum and discreteness in mathematics and the natural sciences is examined. The basic forms of representing the heuristic function of mathematics at theoretical and empirical levels of knowledge are studied: deducing consequences from the axiomatic system of theory, the method of generating mathematical hypotheses, “pure” proofs for the existence of objects and processes, mathematical modelling, the (...)
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  23.  28
    Ian Mueller (2006). Physics and Astronomy: Aristotle's Physics II.2.193b22–194a12. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 16 (2):175-206.
    In the first part of chapter 2 of book II of the Physics Aristotle addresses the issue of the difference between mathematics and physics. In the course of his discussion he says some things about astronomy and the ‘ ‘ more physical branches of mathematics”. In this paper I discuss historical issues concerning the text, translation, and interpretation of the passage, focusing on two cruxes, ( I ) the first reference to astronomy at 193b25–26 and ( II ) (...)
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  24.  10
    G. Contopoulos (2001). The Development of Nonlinear Dynamics in Astronomy. Foundations of Physics 31 (1):89-114.
    We present the historical development of Nonlinear Dynamical Astronomy with emphasis on the “third integral” and its applications. The new era started with the use of computers, and of formal analytical developments in the spirit of Poincaré. Most dynamical systems were found to contain both ordered and chaotic orbits. The transition from order to chaos is discussed. Recent developments refer to the dynamical spectra, integrals of notion in self-consistent models, systems of 3 or more degrees of freedom, chaos in (...)
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  25. Simon Schaffer (1980). Herschel in Bedlam: Natural History and Stellar Astronomy. British Journal for the History of Science 13 (3):211-239.
    In his comprehensive survey of the work of William Herschel, published in the Annuaire du Bureau des Longitudes for 1842, Dominique Arago argued that the life of the great astronomer ‘had the rare privilege of forming an epoch in an extended branch of astronomy’. Arago also noted, however, that Herschel's ideas were often taken as ‘the conceptions of a madman’, even if they were subsequently accepted. This fact, commented Arago, ‘seems to me one that deserves to appear in the (...)
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  26.  15
    Régis Morelon (1994). Ṯābit B. Qurra and Arab Astronomy in the 9th Century. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 4 (1):111.
    bit b. Qurra is especially known as a mathematician, but his work in astronomy is also important. This article reviews his eight surviving astronomical treatises, as well as relevant fragments of his lost works cited by later authors in Arabic and Latin. We conclude that, as an active participant in the scientific movement of 9th-century Baghdad, bit played a crucial role in the establishment of astronomy as an exact science. The argument is based on an assessment of his (...)
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  27.  23
    Christian Houzel (2009). The New Astronomy of Ibn Al-Haytham. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 19 (1):1-41.
    In order to get rid of the contradictions he had identified in Ptolemy’s Astronomy, Ibn al-Haytham abandons cosmology and develops a purely kinematic description of the movement of the wandering stars. This description culminates with the proof that such a star, during its daily movement, reaches exactly one time a maximum height above the horizon and that any inferior height is reached exactly twice. The proofs of these facts necessitates new mathematical tools and Ibn al-Haytham is led to establish (...)
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  28.  10
    Jan Von Plato (1994). Illustrations of Method in Ptolemaic Astronomy. Grazer Philosophische Studien 49:63-75.
    Mathematical Astronomy as the most developed branch of ancient exact sciences has been widely discussed - especially epistemological issues e.g. concerning astronomy as a prime example of the distinction between instrumentalist and realist understanding of theories. In contrast to these the very methodology of ancient astronomy has received little attention. Following the work of Jaakko Hintikka and Unto Remes Aristarchus' method of determining the distance of the Sun is sketched and Ptolemy's solar model is discussed in detail.
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  29.  3
    Duane Hamacher (2015). Stories From the Sky: Astronomy in Indigenous Knowledge. Australian Humanist, The 117:10.
    Hamacher, Duane Indigenous Australian practices, developed and honed over thousands of years, weave science with storytelling. In this Indigenous science series, we'll look at different aspects of First Australians' traditional life and uncover the knowledge behind them - starting today with astronomy.
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  30.  15
    Katie Taylor (2009). Mogg's Celestial Sphere (1813): The Construction of Polite Astronomy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (4):360-371.
    In this paper I discuss a cardboard dissected globe made in 1813 by Edward Mogg, a cartographer and map seller, to instruct children in the principles of astronomy. Since little is known about the maker or the specific object, I draw on evidence beyond the sphere itself to construct an account of how the object might have been used. In particular I address conversation as a key part of astronomical education and examine the way in which the cardboard plates (...)
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  31.  6
    Ivor Bulmer-Thomas (1984). Plato's Astronomy. Classical Quarterly 34 (01):107-.
    In one of the most disputed passages of Greek literature Plato in the Republic, 7. 528e–530c prescribes astronomy as the fourth study in the education of the Guardians. But what sort of astronomy? According to one school of thought it is a purely speculative study of bodies in motion having no relation to the celestial objects that we see. While this interpretation has rejoiced the hearts of Plato's detractors, who regard him as an obstacle to the progress of (...)
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  32.  2
    Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie (1975). Caroline Herschel's Contributions to Astronomy. Annals of Science 32 (2):149-161.
    The nature of the contributions to astronomy of Caroline Lucretia Herschel are explored in this article. Her accomplishments included new observational discoveries and the skilled and accurate transcription and reduction of astronomical data. Although she made important additions to the sum total of astronomical facts available to the scientist, she herself showed little interest or ability in applying these data to explain phenomena. Love of her brother, Sir William Herschel, motivated her achievements in astronomy. Barred from the ranks (...)
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  33.  10
    A. Gregory (1996). Astronomy and Observation in Plato's Republic. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (4):451-471.
    Plato's comments on astronomy and the education of the guardians at Republic 528e ff have been hotly disputed, and have provoked much criticism from those who have interpreted them as a rejection or denigration of observational astronomy. Here I argue that the key to interpreting these comments lies in the relationship between the conception of enquiry that is implicit in the epistemological allegories, and the programme for the education of the guardians that Plato subsequently proposes. We have, I (...)
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  34.  6
    Miguel A. Granada & Dario Tessicini (2005). Copernicus and Fracastoro: The Dedicatory Letters to Pope Paul III, the History of Astronomy, and the Quest for Patronage. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (3):431-476.
    Copernicus’s De revolutionibus and Girolamo Fracastoro’s Homocentrica were both addressed to Pope Paul III . Their dedicatory letters represent a rhetorical exercise in advocating an astronomical reform and an attempt to obtain the papal favour. Following on from studies carried out by Westman and Barker & Goldstein , this paper deals with cultural, intellectual and scientific motives of both texts, and aims at underlining possible relations between them, such as that Copernicus knew of Fracastoro’s Homocentrica, and that at least part (...)
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  35.  8
    E. B. Davies, The Role of Astronomy in the History of Science.
    We discuss the extent to which the visibility of the heavens was a necessary condition for the development of science, with particular reference to the measurement of time. Our conclusion is that while astronomy had significant importance, the growth of most areas of science was more heavily influenced by the accuracy of scientific instruments, and hence by current technology.
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  36.  7
    Giora Hon & Yaakov Zik (2009). Kepler'sOptical Part of Astronomy(1604): Introducing the Ecliptic Instrument. Perspectives on Science 17 (3):307-345.
    The year 2009 marks the 400th anniversary of the publication of one of the most revolutionary scientific texts ever written. In this book, appropriately entitled, Astronomia nova, Johannes Kepler developed an astronomical theory which departs fundamentally from the systems of Ptolemy and Copernicus. One of the great innovations of this theory is its dependence on the science of optics. The declared goal of Kepler in his earlier publication, Paralipomena to Witelo whereby The Optical Part of Astronomy is Treated , (...)
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  37.  6
    F. Rochberg (2002). A Consideration of Babylonian Astronomy Within the Historiography of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (4):661-684.
    This paper traces the reception of Babylonian astronomy into the history of science, beginning in early to mid twentieth century when cuneiform astronomical sources became available to the scholarly public. The dominant positivism in philosophy of science of this time influenced criteria employed in defining and demarcating science by historians, resulting in a persistently negative assessment of the nature of knowledge evidenced in cuneiform sources. Ancient Near Eastern astronomy (and astrology) was deemed pre- or non-scientific, and even taken (...)
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  38.  5
    Roshdi Rashed (2001). Al-Quhi: From Meteorology to Astronomy. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 11 (2):153-156.
    Among the phenomena examined in the Meteorologica , some, although they are sublunar, are too distant to be accessible to direct study. To remedy this situation, it was necessary to develop procedures and methods which could allow observation, and above all the geometrical control of observations. The eventual result of this research was to detach the phenomenon under consideration from meteorology, and to insert it within optics or astronomy. Abū Sahl al-Qūhī , composed a treatise on shooting stars in (...)
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  39.  1
    Ian Inkster (2006). Robert Goodacre's Astronomy Lectures (1823–1825), and the Structure of Scientific Culture in Philadelphia. Annals of Science 35 (4):353-363.
    (1978). Robert Goodacre's astronomy lectures (1823–1825), and the structure of scientific culture in Philadelphia. Annals of Science: Vol. 35, No. 4, pp. 353-363.
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  40.  1
    Godfrey Evans (1970). The Astronomy of Heracleides Ponticus. Classical Quarterly 20 (01):102-.
    Heracleides Ponticus, a pupil of the schools of Plato and Aristotle, who lived from about 390 to 310 B.C., shared the wide interests of many of his pre-Platonic predecessors. Diogenes Laertius gives a long list of his works, many of them now known only by their titles, which he divided into writings on ethics, physics, grammar, music, rhetoric, and history. Like most of his predecessors he gave some attention to the heavens and speculated about the nature of the moon , (...)
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  41.  2
    Volker R. Remmert (2007). Visual Legitimisation of Astronomy in the Sixteenth and Seventeeth Centuries: Atlas, Hercules and Tycho's Nose. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (2):327-362.
    Images of the virtuous hero Hercules and the crowned King Atlas offered considerable potential for legitimising the new astronomy of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The accomplishments of Hercules, a seeker after virtue, with his exceptional learning, his role as disseminator of knowledge, his significance as an example of ideal manhood and, in addition to all, his achievement of immortality, invited comparison with the endeavours of astronomers. Throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Hercules and Atlas appear as the spiritual (...)
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  42.  1
    J. M. Steele (2007). Celestial Measurement in Babylonian Astronomy. Annals of Science 64 (3):293-325.
    Summary Late Babylonian astronomical texts contain frequent measurements of the positions of the Moon and planets. These measurements include distances of the Moon or a planet from a reference star and measurements of the position of celestial bodies within a sign of the zodiac. In this paper, I investigate the relationship between these two measurement systems and propose a new understanding of the concepts of celestial longitude and latitude in Babylonian astronomy. I argue that the Babylonians did not define (...)
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  43.  3
    Daniel Graham (2013). Science Before Socrates: Parmenides, Anaxagoras, and the New Astronomy. OUP Usa.
    In Science before Socrates, Daniel W. Graham argues against the belief that the Presocratic philosophers did not produce any empirical science and that the first major Greek science, astronomy, did not develop until at least the time of Plato. Instead, Graham proposes that the advances made by Presocratic philosophers in the study of astronomy deserve to be considered as scientific contributions.
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  44. Walter E. Gross (2006). The American Philosophical Society and the Rise of Astronomy in the United States in the Middle of the Nineteenth Century. Annals of Science 31 (5):407-427.
    (1974). The American Philosophical Society and the rise of astronomy in the United States in the middle of the nineteenth century. Annals of Science: Vol. 31, No. 5, pp. 407-427.
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  45. Gustav Holmberg (1996). Mechanizing the Astronomer's Vision: On the Role of Photography in Swedish Astronomy,C.1880–1914. Annals of Science 53 (6):609-616.
    The beginnings of photographic astronomy in Sweden are taken as a case study of the incorporation of a new scientific technology. The introduction of photography during the late nineteenth century profoundly changed the way astronomers worked. Observational material became more mobile; photographic plates could be examined at a later date or transported to another location. Photography was presented in a rhetorical language, making it a truly objective way of observing the sky. The new technology was developed at the leading (...)
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  46. John Krige (2002). New Cosmic Horizons: Space Astronomy From the V2 to the Hubble Space Telescope. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:345-345.
    New Cosmic Horizons was written by a project manager, originally trained as a physicist, who worked in the European space world and in business for about twenty‐five years and then returned to academia to complete his Ph.D. It is a well‐written, comprehensive compilation of major scientific results in space astronomy obtained during the latter half of the twentieth century. As the book jacket explains, “it explores the triumphs of space experiments and spacecraft designs and the amazing astronomical results that (...)
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  47. Takanori Kusuba & David Pingree (eds.) (2001). Arabic Astronomy in Sanskrit: Al-Birjandī on Tadhkira Ii , Chapter 11 and its Sanskrit Translation. Brill.
    This book provides the first presentation of the bilingual textual material that illustrates the transmission of Islamic astronomy to scientists of the Indian Sanskritic tradition. It includes editions of the chapter of the _Tadhkira_ in which the mid-thirteenth century Persian astronomer, Nasīr al-dīn al-ṭūsī discussed the new solutions that he devised to overcome certain technical problems in the lunar and planetary models of Ptolemaic astronomy and of the learned commentary composed by al-Birjandī in the early sixteenth century together (...)
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  48.  2
    Roy C. Martin (1999). Astronomy on Trial: A Devastating and Complete Repudiation of the Big Bang Fiasco. Upa.
    Astronomy on Trial systematically and convincingly argues against every aspect of the theory behind the idea of the "Big Bang." Using a readable style that incorporates the laws of physics, Roy C. Martin exposes the impossibilities that have been so commonly manipulated to support the Big Bang theory. He carefully explains the absurdities that have come to represent modern day cosmology and high-energy physics that have arisen from the group-think phenomenon. Martin reveals this group-think as the tendency of scientists (...)
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  49. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & Attila Grandpierre (eds.) (2011). Astronomy and Civilization in the New Enlightenment: Passions of the Skies. Springer.
    This volume represents the first which interfaces with astronomy as the fulcrum of the sciences. It gives full expression to the human passion for the skies. Advancing human civilization has unfolded and matured this passion into the comprehensive science of astronomy. Advancing science’s quest for the first principles of existence meets the ontopoietic generative logos of life, the focal point of the New Enlightenment. It presents numerous perspectives illustrating how the interplay between human beings and the celestial realm (...)
     
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  50. Ji Shen & Jere Confrey (2007). From Conceptual Change to Transformative Modeling: A Case Study of an Elementary Teacher in Learning Astronomy. Science Education 91 (6):948-966.
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