Search results for 'Astronomy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Expanding Horizons & In Astronomy (2001). Martin Rees. In A. Koj & Piotr Sztompka (eds.), Images of the World: Science, Humanities, Art. Jagiellonian University. 55.score: 30.0
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  2. What'S. New In Kepler'S. & New Astronomy (1993). Bernard Goldstein, University of Pittsburgh (Religious Studies and History and History and Philosophy of Science). Journal for General Philosophy of Science 24:203-204.score: 30.0
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  3. J. L. Heilbron (ed.) (2005). The Oxford Guide to the History of Physics and Astronomy. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    With over 150 alphabetically arranged entries about key scientists, concepts, discoveries, technological innovations, and learned institutions, the Oxford Guide to Physics and Astronomy traces the history of physics and astronomy from the Renaissance to the present. For students, teachers, historians, scientists, and readers of popular science books such as Galileo's Daughter, this guide deciphers the methods and philosophies of physics and astronomy as well as the historical periods from which they emerged. Meant to serve the lay reader (...)
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  4. Erik Brogt (2007). Astronomy Education: Becoming a Hybrid Researcher. Journal of Research Practice 3 (1):Article M2.score: 18.0
    This article describes the experiences of a former astronomer who is making the transition to astronomy education research as an international graduate student in the United States. The article describes the author’s encounters with education research, its methodologies, and his changing research interests as he progresses through the graduate program. It also describes his experiences with the busy life of a graduate student in American academia and his experiences as an international student.
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  5. Aaron Adair (2012). The Star of Christ in the Light of Astronomy. Zygon 47 (1):7-29.score: 15.0
    Abstract Centuries of both theologians and astronomers have wondered what the Star of Bethlehem (Matt 2:2, 9) actually was, from miracle to planetary conjunction. Here a history of this search is presented, along with the difficulties the various proposals have had. The natural theories of the Star are found to be a recent innovation, and now almost exclusively maintained by scientists rather than theologians. Current problems with various theories are recognized, as well as general problems with the approach. The interactions (...)
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  6. Thomas S. Kuhn (1957). The Copernican Revolution: Planetary Astronomy in the Development of Western Thought. Harvard University Press.score: 15.0
    The significance of the plurality of the Copernican Revolution is the main thrust of this undergraduate text In this study of the Copernican Revolution, the ...
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  7. Florence C. Hsia (2008). Chinese Astronomy for the Early Modern European Reader. Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):417-450.score: 15.0
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  8. Damien Janos (2010). Al-Fārābī on the Method of Astronomy. Early Science and Medicine 15 (3):237-265.score: 15.0
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  9. K. V. Krishnamurthy (ed.) (2006). National Seminar on "Vedic Astronomy & Cosmology": 10-11th December 2006. I-S.E.R.V.E (Institute of Scientific Research on Vedas).score: 15.0
     
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  10. Dudley Shapere (1993). Astronomy and Antirealism. Philosophy of Science 60 (1):134-150.score: 12.0
    Relying on an analysis of the case of gravitational lensing, Hacking argues for a "modest antirealism" in astronomy. It is shown here that neither his scientific arguments nor his philosophical doctrines imply an antirealist conclusion. An alternative, realistic interpretation of gravitational lensing, and of the nature and history of astronomy more generally, is suggested.
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  11. Peter Barker & Bernard R. Goldstein (1998). Realism and Instrumentalism in Sixteenth Century Astronomy: A Reappraisal. Perspectives on Science 6 (3):232-258.score: 12.0
    : We question the claim, common since Duhem, that sixteenth century astronomy, and especially the Wittenberg interpretation of Copernicus, was instrumentalistic rather than realistic. We identify a previously unrecognized Wittenberg astronomer, Edo Hildericus (Hilderich von Varel), who presents a detailed exposition of Copernicus's cosmology that is incompatible with instrumentalism. Quotations from other sixteenth century astronomers show that knowledge of the real configuration of the heavens was unattainable practically, rather than in principle. Astronomy was limited to quia demonstrations, although (...)
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  12. Ian Mueller (2006). Physics and Astronomy: Aristotle's Physics II.2.193b22–194a12. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 16 (2):175-206.score: 12.0
    In the first part of chapter 2 of book II of the Physics Aristotle addresses the issue of the difference between mathematics and physics. In the course of his discussion he says some things about astronomy and the ‘ ‘ more physical branches of mathematics”. In this paper I discuss historical issues concerning the text, translation, and interpretation of the passage, focusing on two cruxes, ( I ) the first reference to astronomy at 193b25–26 and ( II ) (...)
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  13. Stojan Obradović & Slobodan Ninković (2009). The Heuristic Function of Mathematics in Physics and Astronomy. Foundations of Science 14 (4):351-360.score: 12.0
    This paper considers the role of mathematics in the process of acquiring new knowledge in physics and astronomy. The defining of the notions of continuum and discreteness in mathematics and the natural sciences is examined. The basic forms of representing the heuristic function of mathematics at theoretical and empirical levels of knowledge are studied: deducing consequences from the axiomatic system of theory, the method of generating mathematical hypotheses, “pure” proofs for the existence of objects and processes, mathematical modelling, the (...)
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  14. Alan C. Bowen (2007). The Demarcation of Physical Theory and Astronomy by Geminus and Ptolemy. Perspectives on Science 15 (3):327-358.score: 12.0
    : The Hellenistic reception of Babylonian horoscopic astrology gave rise to the question of what the planets really do and whether astrology is a science. This question in turn became one of defining the Greco-Latin science of astronomy, a project that took Aristotle's views as a starting-point. Thus, I concentrate on one aspect of the various definitions of astronomy proposed in Hellenistic times, their demarcation of astronomy and physical theory. I explicate the account offered by Geminus and (...)
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  15. Roddam Narasimha (2008). Epistemology and Language in Indian Astronomy and Mathematics. Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (4):521-541.score: 12.0
    This paper is in two parts. The first presents an analysis of the epistemology underlying the practice of classical Indian mathematical astronomy, as presented in three works of Nīlakaṇṭha Somayāji (1444–1545 CE). It is argued that the underlying concepts put great value on careful observation and skill in development of algorithms and use of computation. This is reflected in the technical terminology used to describe scientific method. The keywords in this enterprise include parīkṣā, anumāna, gaṇita, yukti, nyāya, siddhānta, tarka (...)
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  16. Christian Houzel (2009). The New Astronomy of Ibn Al-Haytham. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 19 (1):1-41.score: 12.0
    In order to get rid of the contradictions he had identified in Ptolemy’s Astronomy, Ibn al-Haytham abandons cosmology and develops a purely kinematic description of the movement of the wandering stars. This description culminates with the proof that such a star, during its daily movement, reaches exactly one time a maximum height above the horizon and that any inferior height is reached exactly twice. The proofs of these facts necessitates new mathematical tools and Ibn al-Haytham is led to establish (...)
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  17. G. Contopoulos (2001). The Development of Nonlinear Dynamics in Astronomy. Foundations of Physics 31 (1):89-114.score: 12.0
    We present the historical development of Nonlinear Dynamical Astronomy with emphasis on the “third integral” and its applications. The new era started with the use of computers, and of formal analytical developments in the spirit of Poincaré. Most dynamical systems were found to contain both ordered and chaotic orbits. The transition from order to chaos is discussed. Recent developments refer to the dynamical spectra, integrals of notion in self-consistent models, systems of 3 or more degrees of freedom, chaos in (...)
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  18. Ulrich Gähde (2012). Anomalies and Coherence: A Case Study From Astronomy. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (2):347-359.score: 12.0
    In recent decades, the concept of coherence has become one of the key concepts in philosophy. Although there is still no consensus about how to explicate coherence, it is widely accepted that the appearance of anomalies significantly lowers the coherence of a propositional or belief system. In this paper, the relationship between coherence and anomalies is analysed by looking at a specific case study from astronomy. It concerns anomalies that occurred in the first half of the twentieth century during (...)
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  19. Régis Morelon (1994). Ṯābit B. Qurra and Arab Astronomy in the 9th Century. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 4 (01):111-.score: 12.0
    bit b. Qurra is especially known as a mathematician, but his work in astronomy is also important. This article reviews his eight surviving astronomical treatises, as well as relevant fragments of his lost works cited by later authors in Arabic and Latin. We conclude that, as an active participant in the scientific movement of 9th-century Baghdad, bit played a crucial role in the establishment of astronomy as an exact science. The argument is based on an assessment of his (...)
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  20. Martín López Corredoira, Carlos Castro Perelman, Juan Miguel Campanario, Brian Martin, Wolfgang Kundt, J. Marvin Herndon, Marian Apostol, Halton C. Arp, Tom Van Flandern, Andrei P. Kirilyuk & Henry H. Bauer, Against the Tide. A Critical Review by Scientists of How Physics and Astronomy Get Done.score: 12.0
    Nobody should have a monopoly of the truth in this universe. The censorship and suppression of challenging ideas against the tide of mainstream research, the blacklisting of scientists, for instance, is neither the best way to do and filter science, nor to promote progress in the human knowledge. The removal of good and novel ideas from the scientific stage is very detrimental to the pursuit of the truth. There are instances in which a mere unqualified belief can occasionally be converted (...)
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  21. A. Gregory (1996). Astronomy and Observation in Plato's Republic. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (4):451-471.score: 12.0
    Plato's comments on astronomy and the education of the guardians at Republic 528e ff have been hotly disputed, and have provoked much criticism from those who have interpreted them as a rejection or denigration of observational astronomy. Here I argue that the key to interpreting these comments lies in the relationship between the conception of enquiry that is implicit in the epistemological allegories, and the programme for the education of the guardians that Plato subsequently proposes. We have, I (...)
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  22. E. B. Davies, The Role of Astronomy in the History of Science.score: 12.0
    We discuss the extent to which the visibility of the heavens was a necessary condition for the development of science, with particular reference to the measurement of time. Our conclusion is that while astronomy had significant importance, the growth of most areas of science was more heavily influenced by the accuracy of scientific instruments, and hence by current technology.
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  23. Jan Von Plato (1994). Illustrations of Method in Ptolemaic Astronomy. Grazer Philosophische Studien 49:63-75.score: 12.0
    Mathematical Astronomy as the most developed branch of ancient exact sciences has been widely discussed - especially epistemological issues e.g. concerning astronomy as a prime example of the distinction between instrumentalist and realist understanding of theories. In contrast to these the very methodology of ancient astronomy has received little attention. Following the work of Jaakko Hintikka and Unto Remes Aristarchus' method of determining the distance of the Sun is sketched and Ptolemy's solar model is discussed in detail.
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  24. F. Rochberg (2002). A Consideration of Babylonian Astronomy Within the Historiography of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (4):661-684.score: 12.0
    This paper traces the reception of Babylonian astronomy into the history of science, beginning in early to mid twentieth century when cuneiform astronomical sources became available to the scholarly public. The dominant positivism in philosophy of science of this time influenced criteria employed in defining and demarcating science by historians, resulting in a persistently negative assessment of the nature of knowledge evidenced in cuneiform sources. Ancient Near Eastern astronomy (and astrology) was deemed pre- or non-scientific, and even taken (...)
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  25. J. M. Steele (2011). Visual Aspects of the Transmission of Babylonian Astronomy and its Reception Into Greek Astronomy. Annals of Science 68 (4):453-465.score: 12.0
    Summary Evidence for the transmission of Babylonian astronomy into the Greco-Roman world is well attested in the form of observations, numerical parameters and astronomical tables. This paper investigates the reception of Babylonian astronomy in the Greco-Roman world and in particular the transmission, transformation and exploitation of the layout of texts and other visual information. Two examples illustrate this process: the use of Babylonian lunar eclipse records by Greek astronomers and the adaptation of Babylonian methods of eclipse prediction in (...)
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  26. Daniel Graham (2013). Science Before Socrates: Parmenides, Anaxagoras, and the New Astronomy. Oup Usa.score: 12.0
    In Science before Socrates, Daniel W. Graham argues against the belief that the Presocratic philosophers did not produce any empirical science and that the first major Greek science, astronomy, did not develop until at least the time of Plato. Instead, Graham proposes that the advances made by Presocratic philosophers in the study of astronomy deserve to be considered as scientific contributions.
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  27. Ian Inkster (2006). Robert Goodacre's Astronomy Lectures (1823–1825), and the Structure of Scientific Culture in Philadelphia. Annals of Science 35 (4):353-363.score: 12.0
    (1978). Robert Goodacre's astronomy lectures (1823–1825), and the structure of scientific culture in Philadelphia. Annals of Science: Vol. 35, No. 4, pp. 353-363.
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  28. Rhonda Martens (2000). Kepler's Philosophy and the New Astronomy. Princeton University Press.score: 12.0
    Here, Rhonda Martens offers the first extended study of Kepler's philosophical views and shows how those views helped him construct and justify the new astronomy.
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  29. J. M. Steele (2007). Celestial Measurement in Babylonian Astronomy. Annals of Science 64 (3):293-325.score: 12.0
    Summary Late Babylonian astronomical texts contain frequent measurements of the positions of the Moon and planets. These measurements include distances of the Moon or a planet from a reference star and measurements of the position of celestial bodies within a sign of the zodiac. In this paper, I investigate the relationship between these two measurement systems and propose a new understanding of the concepts of celestial longitude and latitude in Babylonian astronomy. I argue that the Babylonians did not define (...)
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  30. Walter E. Gross (2006). The American Philosophical Society and the Rise of Astronomy in the United States in the Middle of the Nineteenth Century. Annals of Science 31 (5):407-427.score: 12.0
    (1974). The American Philosophical Society and the rise of astronomy in the United States in the middle of the nineteenth century. Annals of Science: Vol. 31, No. 5, pp. 407-427.
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  31. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & Attila Grandpierre (eds.) (2011). Astronomy and Civilization in the New Enlightenment: Passions of the Skies. Springer.score: 12.0
    This volume represents the first which interfaces with astronomy as the fulcrum of the sciences. It gives full expression to the human passion for the skies. Advancing human civilization has unfolded and matured this passion into the comprehensive science of astronomy. Advancing science’s quest for the first principles of existence meets the ontopoietic generative logos of life, the focal point of the New Enlightenment. It presents numerous perspectives illustrating how the interplay between human beings and the celestial realm (...)
     
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  32. Flo Leibowitz & Loren Russell (2009). Six Stories From the End of Representation: Images in Painting, Photography, Astronomy, Microscopy, Particle Physics, and Quantum Mechanics, 1980-2000 by Elkins, James. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):247-249.score: 9.0
  33. James Elkins (2008). Six Stories From the End of Representation: Images in Painting, Photography, Astronomy, Microscopy, Particle Physics, and Quantum Mechanics, 1980-2000. Stanford University Press.score: 9.0
    James Elkins has shaped the discussion about how we—as artists, as art historians, or as outsiders—view art. He has not only revolutionized our thinking about the purpose of teaching art, but has also blazed trails in creating a means of communication between scientists, artists, and humanities scholars. In Six Stories from the End of Representation , Elkins weaves stories about recent images from painting, photography, physics, astrophysics, and microscopy. These images, regardless of origin, all fail as representations: they are blurry, (...)
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  34. Bernard R. Goldstein (1992). Book Review:The General History of Astronomy. Vol. 2: Planetary Astronomy From the Renaissance to the Rise of Astrophysics. Part A: Tycho Brahe to Newton Rene Taton, Curtis Wilson. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 59 (4):698-.score: 9.0
  35. Jonathan B. Beere (2003). Counting the Unmoved Movers: Astronomy and Explanation in Aristotles Metaphysics XII. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 85 (1):1-20.score: 9.0
  36. Giora Hon Yaakov Zik (2009). Kepler's Optical Part of Astronomy (1604): Introducing the Ecliptic Instrument. Perspectives on Science 17 (3):pp. 307-345.score: 9.0
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  37. Anne Tihon (2002). Certainty, Doubt, and Errors in Byzantine Astronomy. Early Science and Medicine 7 (3):292-293.score: 9.0
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  38. Patrick Suppes (2007). Statistical Concepts in Philosophy of Science. Synthese 154 (3):485--496.score: 9.0
    This article focuses on the role of statistical concepts in both experiment and theory in various scientific disciplines, especially physics, including astronomy, and psychology. In Sect. 1 the concept of uncertainty in astronomy is analyzed from Ptolemy to Laplace and Gauss. In Sect. 2 theoretical uses of probability and statistics in science are surveyed. Attention is focused on the historically important example of radioactive decay. In Sect. 3 the use of statistics in biology and the social sciences is (...)
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  39. Elly Dekker (2008). Ordering the Heavens: Roman Astronomy and Cosmology in the Carolingian Renaissance. Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):514-515.score: 9.0
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  40. Janet Atkinson-Grosjean & Cory Fairley (2009). Moral Economies in Science: From Ideal to Pragmatic. Minerva 47 (2):147-170.score: 9.0
    In the following pages we discuss three historical cases of moral economies in science: Drosophila genetics, late twentieth century American astronomy, and collaborations between American drug companies and medical scientists in the interwar years. An examination of the most striking differences and similarities between these examples, and the conflicts internal to them, reveals constitutive features of moral economies, and the ways in which they are formed, negotiated, and altered. We critically evaluate these three examples through the filters of rational (...)
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  41. Damien Janos (2011). Moving the Orbs: Astronomy, Physics, and Metaphysics, and the Problem of Celestial Motion According to Ibn Sīnā. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 21 (02):165-214.score: 9.0
    Ibn S's celestial kinematics represents an important aspect of his cosmology but has up to now received little attention in the secondary literature. After a short overview of some key features of his cosmology, this article attempts to clarify the role played by the separate intellects, the celestial souls, and the celestial bodies in causing celestial motion. It challenges the common view that Ibn S adhered to the theory of ten separate intellects developed by al-Fbnā's cosmological method.
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  42. Alexander P. D. Mourelatos (1981). Astronomy and Kinematics in Plato's Project of Rationalist Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 12 (1):1-32.score: 9.0
  43. Steven Vanden Broecke (2004). Astrological Reform, Calvinism, and Cartesianism: Copernican Astronomy in the Low Countries, 1550–1650. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):363-381.score: 9.0
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  44. Peter Barker (2002). New Foundations in the History of Astronomy: Four Papers in Honor of Bernard R. Goldstein. Perspectives on Science 10 (2):151-154.score: 9.0
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  45. Bernard R. Goldstein (1995). Book Review:New Astronomy Johannes Kepler, William H. Donahue. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 62 (1):161-.score: 9.0
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  46. Ian Hacking (1989). The Divided Circle: A History of Instruments for Astronomy, Navigation and Surveying. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (2):265-270.score: 9.0
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  47. Jutta Schickore (1999). Sehen, Sichtbarkeit Und Empirische Forschung. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 30 (2):273-287.score: 9.0
    Vision, Visibility, and Empirical Research. In general, natural scientists use the concept of observation in a liberal way: they talk of observing electrons, DNA, or distant quasars. Several philosophers of science have recently argued for a similar use of the concept of observation: they have claimed that the important aspects of scientific research can only be properly reconstructed in accordance with how this term is actually used in science. With reference to an example from astronomy, I point out that (...)
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  48. Michael Shank (2009). Setting Up Copernicus? Astronomy and Natural Philosophy in Giambattista Capuano da Manfredonia's Expositio on the Sphere. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):290-315.score: 9.0
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  49. C. P. Sanger (1928). Astronomy and Cosmogony. By J. H. Jeans M.A., D.Sc., LL.D., F.R.S. , (Cambridge University Press. 1928. Pp. X + 420. Price 31s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 3 (12):533-.score: 9.0
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  50. Katie Taylor (2009). Mogg's Celestial Sphere (1813): The Construction of Polite Astronomy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (4):360-371.score: 9.0
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