Search results for 'Attitude change' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  3
    Helen Peak, H. William Morrison & R. P. Quinn (1960). The Generalization of Attitude Change Within a Serial Structure. Journal of Experimental Psychology 59 (5):281.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  11
    Randy Malamud, Lori Marino, Nathan Nobis, Ron Broglio & Scott O. Lilienfeld (2010). Do Zoos and Aquariums Promote Attitude Change in Visitors? A Critical Evaluation of the American Zoo and Aquarium Study. Society and Animals 18 (2):126-138.
    Modern-day zoos and aquariums market themselves as places of education and conservation. A recent study conducted by the American Zoo and Aquarium Association is being widely heralded as the first direct evidence that visits to zoos and aquariums produce long-term positive effects on people’s attitudes toward other animals. In this paper, we address whether this conclusion is warranted by analyzing the study’s methodological soundness. We conclude that Falk et al. contains at least six major threats to methodological validity that undermine (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3.  14
    Lori Marino, Scott O. Lilienfeld, Randy Malamud, Nathan Nobis & Ron Broglio (2010). Do Zoos and Aquariums Promote Attitude Change in Visitors? A Critical Evaluation of the American Zoo and Aquarium Study. Society and Animals 18 (2):126-138.
    Modern-day zoos and aquariums market themselves as places of education and conservation. A recent study conducted by the American Zoo and Aquarium Association is being widely heralded as the first direct evidence that visits to zoos and aquariums produce long-term positive effects on people’s attitudes toward other animals. In this paper, we address whether this conclusion is warranted by analyzing the study’s methodological soundness. We conclude that Falk et al. contains at least six major threats to methodological validity that undermine (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  2
    Ramon J. Rhine & Betsy A. Silun (1958). Acquisition and Change of a Concept Attitude as a Function of Consistency of Reinforcement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (6):524.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  8
    Cynthia L. Vernon, Kerry Bronnenkant, Joe E. Heimlich & John H. Falk (2010). Critique of a Critique: Do Zoos and Aquariums Promote Attitude Change in Visitors? Society and Animals 18 (4):415-419.
    Marino et al. recently published a critique of a three-year National Science Foundation—funded investigation of the impact of zoo and aquarium visits on the public’s understanding of animals and their attitudes toward conservation . This critique of that critique will show that Marino et al. seriously misrepresent both the intent of the research and the methods used. The methods used by Falk and his colleagues were consistent with current, accepted research practice and their conclusions regarding impact were congruent with a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  4
    Richard E. Petty, Joseph R. Priester & Duane T. Wegener (1994). Cognitive Processes in Attitude Change. In R. Wyer & T. Srull (eds.), Handbook of Social Cognition. Lawrence Erlbaum 2--69.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  7
    Shuichi Nishio & Hiroshi Ishiguro (2011). Attitude Change Induced by Different Appearances of Interaction Agents. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (01):115-126.
  8.  1
    R. E. Doty (1996). Attitude Change and Right-Brain Thinking. Journal of Thought 31:39-46.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  3
    David R. Shaffer (1974). Attitude Extremity as a Determinant of Attitude Change in the Forced-Compliance Experiment. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 3 (1):51-53.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  2
    J. L. Smith (1975). A Games Analysis for Attitude Change: Use of Role Enactment Situations for Model Development. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 5 (1):63–80.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  10
    Franco de Franco, María Josefina, Franco Franco & Andreina del Valle (2013). Herramientas Que Permiten Lograr Un Cambio de Actitud, Proceso Estratégico y Cualidad Como Dimensiones Del Pensamiento Estratégico En Los Gerentes Tools That Allow Achieve a Change of Attitude, Process and Quality Strategic Thinking and Strategic Dimensions in Managers. Daena 8 (1):103-129.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. H. J. Rose & S. G. F. Brandon (1954). Time and Mankind: An Historical and Philosophical Study of Mankind's Attitude to the Phenomena of Change. Journal of Hellenic Studies 74:215.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13. G. Frongia (1998). Justification of Change in Moral Attitude: Moral Reasoning. Topoi 17 (2):107-125.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. U. I. Iyam (2008). Factors Responsible for the Change of Attitude From Male to Female Centred Society: Evidence From Nigeria. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 9 (2).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  8
    Sarah Knight, Kim Bard, Aldert Vrij & Doug Brandon (2010). Human Rights, Animal Wrongs? Exploring Attitudes Toward Animal Use and Possibilities for Change. Society and Animals 18 (3):251-272.
    Presented here are three research studies examining psychological characteristics underlying attitudes toward the use of nonhuman animals: beliefs and value systems; their comparative impact on opinions; and empathetic responses to humans and to animals. The first study demonstrated that the attitudes of laypeople are context dependent: different sets of beliefs underlie attitudes toward various types of animal use. Belief in the existence of alternatives was especially important, accounting alone for 40% of the variance in attitudes. The second study compared the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  8
    Aldert Vrij, Sarah Knight, Doug Brandon & Kim Bard (2010). Human Rights, Animal Wrongs? Exploring Attitudes Toward Animal Use and Possibilities for Change. Society and Animals 18 (3):251-272.
    Presented here are three research studies examining psychological characteristics underlying attitudes toward the use of nonhuman animals: beliefs and value systems; their comparative impact on opinions; and empathetic responses to humans and to animals. The first study demonstrated that the attitudes of laypeople are context dependent: different sets of beliefs underlie attitudes toward various types of animal use. Belief in the existence of alternatives was especially important, accounting alone for 40% of the variance in attitudes. The second study compared the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  9
    Michael Andrew Ranney & Dav Clark (2016). Climate Change Conceptual Change: Scientific Information Can Transform Attitudes. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):49-75.
    Of this article's seven experiments, the first five demonstrate that virtually no Americans know the basic global warming mechanism. Fortunately, Experiments 2–5 found that 2–45 min of physical–chemical climate instruction durably increased such understandings. This mechanistic learning, or merely receiving seven highly germane statistical facts, also increased climate-change acceptance—across the liberal-conservative spectrum. However, Experiment 7's misleading statistics decreased such acceptance. These readily available attitudinal and conceptual changes through scientific information disconfirm what we term “stasis theory”—which some researchers and many (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  18.  11
    Stephan Lewandowsky (2016). Future Global Change and Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):7-18.
    The 11 articles in this issue explore how people respond to climate change and other global challenges. The articles pursue three broad strands of enquiry that relate to the effects and causes of “skepticism” about climate change, the purely cognitive challenges that are posed by a complex scientific issue, and the ways in which climate change can be communicated to a wider audience. Cognitive science can contribute to understanding people's responses to global challenges in many ways, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  19
    Till Grüne-Yanoff (2013). Preference Change and Conservatism: Comparing the Bayesian and the AGM Models of Preference Revision. Synthese 190 (14):2623-2641.
    Richard Bradley’s Bayesian model of preference kinematics is compared with Sven Ove Hansson’s AGM-style model of preference revision. Both seek to model the revision of preference orders as a consequence of retaining consistency when some preferences change. Both models are often interpreted normatively, as giving advice on how an agent should revise her preferences. I raise four criticisms of the Bayesian model: it is unrealistic; it neglects an important change mechanism; it disregards endogenous information relevant to preference (...), in particular about similarity and incompleteness; and its representational framework, when expanded with similarity comparisons, may give misleading advice. These criticisms are based on a principle of conservatism, and on two proposals of similarity metrics for the Bayesian model. The performance of the Bayesian model, with and without the similarity metrics, is then tested in three different cases of preference change, and compared to the performance of the AGM model. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  2
    Veress Karoly (2010). To Be Thoughtful of the Other. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):94-106.
    In my paper I examine the question of tolerance. In the first part of the discussion I follow up the process in the course of which the problem of tolerance appearing in connection to the practice of religious freedom in the 17th-18th centuries leaves the territory of religious morality and the relation of church and state, and is placed into the empirical sphere of a general human relation to the otherness of the other, and with it to the private sphere (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  46
    Ruth Alas (2009). The Impact of Work-Related Values on the Readiness to Change in Estonian Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):113 - 124.
    This study contributes to our understanding of how work-related values, including ethics, are connected with the readiness to change in Estonian organizations. Research in Estonian companies involved 747 respondents. The author examined the influence of work-related values on attitude towards change and organizational learning. Empirical research in Estonian organizations indicates that work-related values predict attitude towards change and organizational learning. This study indicates the need for ethical conduct to achieve a competitive advantage in Estonia. Guidelines (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  8
    Sharon Mary Cruise, Christopher Alan Lewis & Bill Lattimer (2007). Temporal Stability of the Francis Scale of Attitude Toward Christianity Short-Form Among 10- To 12-Year-Old English Children: Test-Retest Data Over 15 Weeks. [REVIEW] Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):259-267.
    Recently three studies have reported on the test-retest reliability of the Francis Scale of Attitude toward Christianity; however, these studies were limited to comparatively small samples . The present study examined the temporal stability of the 7-item version of the Francis Scale of Attitude toward Christianity over a 15-week period among a sample of 581 English children aged between 10 and 12 years. Data demonstrated that stability across the two administrations was very high ; however, there was a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  6
    Christopher Alan Lewis, Sharon Mary Cruise & Bill Lattimer (2007). Temporal Stability of the Francis Scale of Attitude Toward Christianity Short-Form Among 10- To 12-Year-Old English Children: Test-Retest Data Over 15 Weeks. [REVIEW] Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):259-267.
    Recently three studies have reported on the test-retest reliability of the Francis Scale of Attitude toward Christianity; however, these studies were limited to comparatively small samples . The present study examined the temporal stability of the 7-item version of the Francis Scale of Attitude toward Christianity over a 15-week period among a sample of 581 English children aged between 10 and 12 years. Data demonstrated that stability across the two administrations was very high ; however, there was a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Rinat M. Nugayev & Christian Suhm (1997). Reconstruction of Scientific Theory Change. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 28 (1):206-210.
    In his book “Reconstruction of Scientific Change” R.M. Nugayev proposes a new model of theory change by analyzing the reasons for theory change in science. Nugayev’s theoretical concept is based on a realist’s philosophical attitude. The most important notions of Nugayev’ s conception of theory change are “theories’ cross” and “crossbred objects”, which he takes from the terminology of other Russian philosophers of science (Bransky, Podgoretzky, Smorodinsky). His investigations often refer to several famous Western philosophers. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  57
    Richard Bradley (2009). Becker's Thesis and Three Models of Preference Change. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (2):223-242.
    This article examines Becker's thesis that the hypothesis that choices maximize expected utility relative to fixed and universal tastes provides a general framework for the explanation of behaviour. Three different models of preference revision are presented and their scope evaluated. The first, the classical conditioning model, explains all changes in preferences in terms of changes in the information held by the agent, holding fundamental beliefs and desires fixed. The second, the Jeffrey conditioning model, explains them in terms of changes in (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  26.  19
    Heather Looy, Florence V. Dunkel & John R. Wood (2014). How Then Shall We Eat? Insect-Eating Attitudes and Sustainable Foodways. Agriculture and Human Values 31 (1):131-141.
    Negative attitudes toward invertebrates are a deep-seated, visceral response among Western peoples. These internalized aversions toward insects and other terrestrial arthropods, both in general and specifically as a food source, subtly and systemically contribute to unsustainable global foodways. Insect cuisine is, for Westerners, emblematic of the alien, a threat to our psychological and cultural identity. Yet failure to embrace entomophagy prevents us from seeing the full humanity of those of other classes, races, and cultures, and leads to agricultural and food (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  8
    Maurits Kaptein, Panos Markopoulos, Boris Ruyter & Emile Aarts (2011). Two Acts of Social Intelligence: The Effects of Mimicry and Social Praise on the Evaluation of an Artificial Agent. [REVIEW] AI and Society 26 (3):261-273.
    This paper describes a study of the effects of two acts of social intelligence, namely mimicry and social praise, when used by an artificial social agent. An experiment ( N = 50) is described which shows that social praise—positive feedback about the ongoing conversation—increases the perceived friendliness of a chat-robot. Mimicry—displaying matching behavior—enhances the perceived intelligence of the robot. We advice designers to incorporate both mimicry and social praise when their system needs to function as a social actor. Different ways (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  3
    Jean Vanier (2003). Finding Peace. House of Anansi Press.
    Peace is not just the work of governments or armies or diplomats, he argues, but the task of each one of us. We can all become makers of peace. We can do our part.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Irene Heim (1992). Presupposition Projection and the Semantics of Attitude Verbs. Journal of Semantics 9 (3):183-221.
    Karttunen observed that, if the complement of an attitude sentence presupposes p, then that sentence as a whole presupposes that the attitude–holder believes p. I attempt to derive some representative instances of this generalization from suitable assumptions about the lexical semantics of attitude predicates. The enterprise is carried out in a framework of context change semantics, which incorporates Stalnaker's suggestion that presupposition projection results from the stepwise fashion in which information is updated in response to complex (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   53 citations  
  30. Lars Hall, Petter Johansson & Thomas Strandberg (2012). Lifting the Veil of Morality: Choice Blindness and Attitude Reversals on a Self-Transforming Survey. PLoS ONE 7 (9):e45457. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.
    Every day, thousands of polls, surveys, and rating scales are employed to elicit the attitudes of humankind. Given the ubiquitous use of these instruments, it seems we ought to have firm answers to what is measured by them, but unfortunately we do not. To help remedy this situation, we present a novel approach to investigate the nature of attitudes. We created a self-transforming paper survey of moral opinions, covering both foundational principles, and current dilemmas hotly debated in the media. This (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  31.  9
    Pamela Yeow, Alison Dean & Danielle Tucker (2013). Bags for Life: The Embedding of Ethical Consumerism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 125 (1):1-13.
    The aim of this paper is to understand why some ethical behaviours fail to embed, and importantly what can be done about it. We address this by looking at an example where ethical behaviour has not become the norm, i.e. the widespread, habitual, use of ‘bags for life’. This is an interesting case because whilst a consistent message of ‘saving the environment’ has been the basis of the promotion of ‘bags for life’ in the United Kingdom for many years, their (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  32.  67
    Demian Whiting (2009). Should Doctors Ever Be Professionally Required to Change Their Attitudes? Clinical Ethics 4 (2):67-73.
    The General Medical Council instructs doctors not to allow their personal beliefs to interfere with their practice. But if attitudes can threaten to impact negatively on a doctor's practice then the question arises: should doctors ever be professionally required to change their attitudes? In this paper I suggest that doctors should be required to amend their attitudes if two conditions are met, namely: (1) the doctor has an attitude that if neglected by the doctor will (or is very (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  3
    Dimitri Ginev (2010). The Erotic Attitude Toward Nature and Cognitive Existentialism. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (152):145-160.
    ExcerptI. Marcuse's “New Science”In his celebrated critique of “technological rationality,” Herbert Marcuse pleads for a “new science” in which an “erotic” attitude toward nature would permit the entities of the natural world to transform in such a manner that they become free to be what they are. Following this line of reasoning in Eros and Civilization, he reaches the conclusion: “To be what they are they depend on the erotic attitude: they receive their telos only in it.”1 In (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  12
    Gerry Mackie (2006). Does Democratic Deliberation Change Minds? Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (3):279-303.
    Discussion is frequently observed in democratic politics, but change in view is rarely observed. Call this the ‘unchanging minds hypothesis’. I assume that a given belief or desire is not isolated, but, rather, is located in a network structure of attitudes, such that persuasion sufficient to change an attitude in isolation is not sufficient to change the attitude as supported by its network. The network structure of attitudes explains why the unchanging minds hypothesis seems to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  9
    S. K. Singh (2008). Philosophy of Change Management. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 29:157-163.
    The persons who adapt to changes as may be necessary in the course of their existence not only survive in the struggle for existence but also thrive and enjoy their lives in the best possible way under the given circumstances. For, life consists in various relationships, which are in constant movement and change.Therefore dealing with change or change-management has got pivotal importance in all walks of humans’ lives. In order to facilitate smooth change all big and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Graeme Forbes, Content and Theme in Attitude Ascriptions.
    This paper is about a substitution-failure in attitude ascriptions, but not the one you think. A standard view about the semantic shape of ‘that’-clause attitude ascriptions is that they are fundamentally relational. The attitude verb expresses a binary relation whose extension, if not empty, is a collection of pairs each of which consists in an individual and a proposition, while the ‘that’-clause is a term for a proposition. One interesting problem this view faces is that, within the (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  6
    S. K. Singh (2008). Philosophy of Change Management. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 29:157-163.
    The persons who adapt to changes as may be necessary in the course of their existence not only survive in the struggle for existence but also thrive and enjoy their lives in the best possible way under the given circumstances. For, life consists in various relationships, which are in constant movement and change.Therefore dealing with change or change-management has got pivotal importance in all walks of humans’ lives. In order to facilitate smooth change all big and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  25
    Franz Dietrich, Modelling Change in Individual Characteristics: An Axiomatic Framework.
    Economic models describe individuals in terms of underlying characteristics, such as taste for some good, sympathy level for another player, time discount rate, risk attitude, and so on. In real life, such characteristics change: taste for Mozart changes by listening to it, sympathy for another player changes by observing his moves, and so on. Models typically ignore change, not just for simplicity but also because it is unclear how to incorporate change. I introduce a general axiomatic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  20
    E. Holly Buttner, Kevin B. Lowe & Lenora Billings-Harris (2007). Impact of Leader Racial Attitude on Ratings of Causes and Solutions for an Employee of Color Shortage. Journal of Business Ethics 73 (2):129 - 144.
    Diversity scholars have emphasized the critical role of corporate leaders for ensuring the success of diversity strategic initiatives in organizations. This study reports on business school leaders’ attributions regarding the causes for and solutions to the low representation of U.S. faculty of color in business schools. Results indicatethat leaders with greater awareness of racial issues rated an inhospitable organizational culture as a more important cause and cultural change and recruitment as more important solutions to faculty of color under-representation than (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40.  72
    I. Illich (1975). The Medicalization of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):73-77.
    Two contributions from Dr Ivan Illich follow. The first, in which he sets out his primary thesis of the medicalization of life, is a section from Dr Illich's book `Medical Nemesis'. (It is reprinted with the permission of the author and his publishers, Messrs Calder and Boyars.) The second is a transcript of the paper which Dr Illich read at the conference organized by the London Medical Group on iatrogenic disease. Both are ultimately addressed to the recipients of medical care, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41. Jeffrey Paul Bishop (2011). The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying. University of Notre Dame Press.
    In this original and compelling book, Jeffrey P. Bishop, a philosopher, ethicist, and physician, argues that something has gone sadly amiss in the care of the dying by contemporary medicine and in our social and political views of death, as shaped by our scientific successes and ongoing debates about euthanasia and the "right to die"--or to live. __The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying__, informed by Foucault's genealogy of medicine and power as well as by a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  42.  26
    Wiebe van der Hoek, Wojciech Jamroga & Michael Wooldridge (2007). Towards a Theory of Intention Revision. Synthese 155 (2):265-290.
    Although the change of beliefs in the face of new information has been widely studied with some success, the revision of other mental states has received little attention from the theoretical perspective. In particular, intentions are widely recognised as being a key attitude for rational agents, and while several formal theories of intention have been proposed in the literature, the logic of intention revision has been hardly considered. There are several reasons for this: perhaps most importantly, intentions are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  43.  3
    Darlene Fozard Weaver (2013). Double Agents. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):710-726.
    Jennifer Herdt's Putting On Virtue argues for the theological and normative superiority of noncompetitive accounts of divine and human agency. Although such accounts affirm the indispensability and sovereignty of divine grace they also acknowledge human agents as active participants in their own moral change. Indeed, Herdt contends we cannot coherently describe the human telos as entailing a transformation of character without affirming that human agents meaningfully contribute to that change. Nevertheless, a recurrent worry in Putting On Virtue is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  6
    J. Price, D. Price, G. Williams & R. Hoffenberg (1998). Changes in Medical Student Attitudes as They Progress Through a Medical Course. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (2):110-117.
    Objectives - To explore the wvay ethical principles develop during a medical education course for three groups of medical students - in their first year, at the beginning of their penultimate (fifth) year and towards the end of their final (sixth) year. Design - Survey questionnaire administered to medical students in their first, fifth and final (sixth) year. Setting - A large medical school in Queensland, Australia. Survey sample - Approximately half the students in each of three years (first, fifth (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45.  11
    Vassilis Sakellariou (2011). Restoring Continuity in Theory Change: The Kepler-to-Newton Case. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 42 (1):109 - 127.
    In the on-going debate between scientific realism and its various opponents, a crucial role in challenging the realist claim that success of scientific theories must be attributed to their approximate truth is played by the so-called pessimistic meta-induction: Arguing that the history of science boils down to a succession of theories which, though successful at a time, were eventually discarded only to be replaced by alternative theories which in turn met with the same fate, it purports to show that the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Elizabeth Coates & Dorothy Faulkner (eds.) (2016). Progress, Change and Development in Early Childhood Education and Care: International Perspectives. Routledge.
    In 2000, the Millennium Development Goals set out targets aimed at creating a safer, more prosperous, and more equitable world. If these goals were to be achieved, children’s lives would indeed be transformed. In this collection, achievements against these targets are identified, with each contributor examining the progress made in early years provision in Australia, China, England, Greece, the Netherlands, Portugal, South Africa, and Sweden. They highlight the priorities and agendas of their respective governments, and focus on the trends and (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  85
    Simon Caney (forthcoming). Climate Change and Non-Ideal Theory: Six Ways of Responding to Noncompliance. In Clare Heyward & Dominic Roser (eds.), Climate Justice in a Non-Ideal World. Oxford University Press
    This paper examines what agents should do when others fail to comply with their responsibilities to prevent dangerous climate change. It distinguishes between six different possible responses to noncompliance. These include what I term (1) 'target modification' (watering down the extent to which we seek to prevent climate change), (2) ‘responsibility reallocation’ (reassigning responsibilities to other duty bearers), (3) ‘burden shifting I’ (allowing duty bearers to implement policies which impose unjust burdens on others, (4) 'burden shifting II’ (allowing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  88
    Cristian Timmermann & Georges F. Félix, Adapting Food Production to Climate Change: An Inclusive Approach. Climate Change and Human Rights: The 2015 Paris Conference and the Task of Protecting People on a Warming Planet.
    On why agricultural innovation from the Global South can and should be used to adapt food production to climate change. Discussed on hand of three cases studies.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  32
    Craig Cormick (2009). Why Do We Need to Know What the Public Thinks About Nanotechnology? NanoEthics 3 (2):167-173.
    Public debate on nanotechnology is a large topic within governments, research agencies, industry and non-government organisations. But depending who you talk to the perception of what the public thinks about nanotechnology can be very varied. To define coherent policy and to invest in research and development that aligns with public preferences, needs more than just perceptions of public perceptions. Public attitude studies are vital in understanding what the public really think, but they need to go further than simplistic polling (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  50.  78
    Sonja J. Ellis (2002). Moral Reasoning and Homosexuality: The Acceptability of Arguments About Lesbian and Gay Issues. Journal of Moral Education 31 (4):455-467.
    In the political arena, lesbian and gay issues have been contested typically on grounds of human rights, but with variable success. Using a moral developmental framework, the purpose of this study was to explore preferences for different types of moral arguments when thinking about moral dilemmas around lesbian and gay issues. The analysis presented here comprised data collected from 545 students at UK universities who completed a questionnaire, part of which comprised a moral dilemma task. Findings of the study showed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000