Search results for 'Augustine Thompson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Caleb Thompson (2002). Wittgenstein, Augustine and the Fantasy of Ascent. Philosophical Investigations 25 (2):153–171.score: 360.0
  2. Phillip M. Thompson (2009). Augustine and the Death Penalty. Augustinian Studies 40 (2):181-203.score: 360.0
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  3. John L. Thompson (forthcoming). Book Review: Augustine's Commentary on Galatians: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Notes. [REVIEW] Interpretation 58 (4):430-432.score: 360.0
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  4. Christopher J. Thompson (1995). Benedict, Thomas, or Augustine? The Character of MacIntyre's Narrative. The Thomist 59 (3):379-407.score: 360.0
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  5. Christopher J. Thompson (1996). Christian Identity and Augustine's Confessions. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 70:249-258.score: 360.0
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  6. Samantha Thompson (2006). The Confessions of Saint Augustine : Accessory to Grace. In Thomas Mathien & D. G. Wright (eds.), Autobiography as Philosophy: The Philosophical Uses of Self-Presentation. Routledge.score: 360.0
     
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  7. Augustine Thompson (1995). The Debate on Universals Before Peter Abelard. Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):409-429.score: 240.0
  8. Evan Thompson (2005). Neurophenomenology: An Introduction for Neurophilosophers Evan Thompson, Antoine Lutz, and Diego Cosmelli. In Andrew Brook & Kathleen Akins (eds.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge University Press. 40.score: 210.0
    s ciousness called ‘neurophenomenology’ (Varela 1996) and illustrates it with a r ecent pilot study (Lutz et al., 2002). At a theoretical level, neurophenomenology p ursues an embodied and large-scale dynamical approach to the n europhysiology of consciousness (Varela 1995; Thompson and Varela 2001; V arela and Thompson 2003). At a methodological level, the neurophenomeno- l ogical strategy is to make rigorous and extensive use of first-person data about s ubjective experience as a heuristic to describe and quantify (...)
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  9. Per Sandin, Erland Mårald, Aidan Davison, David E. Nye & Paul B. Thompson (2013). Book Symposium on The Agrarian Vision: Sustainability and Environmental Ethics by Paul B. Thompson. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 26 (3):301-320.score: 180.0
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  10. Carolyn Raffensperger, Mora Campbell & Paul B. Thompson (1998). Considering The Spirit of the Soil by Paul B. Thompson. Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):161-176.score: 180.0
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  11. Paul B. Thompson & Thomas C. Hilde (eds.) (2000). The Agrarian Roots of Pragmatism / Edited by Paul B. Thompson and Thomas C. Hilde. Vanderbilt University Press.score: 180.0
    The essays in this volume critically analyze and revitalize agrarian philosophy by tracing its evolution in the classical American philosophy of key figures such as Franklin, Jefferson, Emerson, Thoreau, Dewey, and Royce.
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  12. George Dameron (2006). Augustine Thompson, O.P., Cities of God: The Religion of the Italian Communes, 1125–1325. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2005. Pp. Xiii, 502; 61 Black-and-White Figures. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (3):927-928.score: 150.0
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  13. Peter Howard (1994). Augustine Thompson, OP, Revival Preachers and Politics in Thirteenth-Century Italy: The Great Devotion of 1233. Oxford: Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press, 1992. Pp. Xiv, 244; 2 Tables, 2 Maps. [REVIEW] Speculum 69 (4):1284-1286.score: 150.0
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  14. Ann A. Pang-White (2011). Friendship and Happiness: Why Matter Matters in Augustine's Confessions. In Richard C. Taylor David Twetten & Michael Wreen (eds.), Tolle Lege: Essays on Augustine & on Medieval Philosophy in Honor of Roland J. Teske. Marquette University Press. 175-195.score: 27.0
    This paper presents a refreshing new reading of Augustine's view on matter. It argues that Augustine's evolving view on matter from the negative to the positive, from the overly simplistic understanding of matter as something purely physical to a nuanced view of spiritual matter, played an essential role in the Confessions. Matter, in this new understanding, accounts for both space and time. As Augustine matured as a thinker, he saw matter's potentiality also positively as possibility for grace (...)
     
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  15. Scott M. Williams (2010). Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.score: 24.0
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the (...)
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  16. DEREK A. McDOUGALL (2008). PICTURES PRIVACY AUGUSTINE AND THE MIND A UNITY IN WITTGENSTEIN'S PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS. Journal of Philosophical Research 33 (1):33-72.score: 24.0
    This paper weaves together a number of separate strands each relating to an aspect of Wittgenstein’s PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS. The first strand introduces his radical and incoherent idea of a private object. Wittgenstein in § 258 and related passages is not investigating a perfectly ordinary notion of first person privacy; but his critics have treated his question, whether a private language is possible, solely in terms of their quite separate question of how our ordinary sensation terms can be understood, in a (...)
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  17. Cynthia R. Nielsen (2009). St. Augustine on Text and Reality (and a Little Gadamerian Spice). Heythrop Journal 50 (1):98-108.score: 24.0
    One way of viewing the organizing structure of the Confessions is to see it as an engagement with various texts at different phases of St. Augustine’s life. In the early books of the Confessions, Augustine describes the disordered state that made him unable to read any text (sacred or profane) properly. Yet following his conversion his entire orientation— not only to texts but also to reality as a whole—changes. This essay attempts to trace the winding paths that lead (...)
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  18. Scott Macdonald (2008). How Can One Search for God?: The Paradox of Inquiry in Augustine's Confessions. Metaphilosophy 39 (1):20–38.score: 24.0
    The Confessions recounts Augustine's successful search for God. But Augustine worries that one cannot search for God if one does not already know God. That version of the paradox of <span class='Hi'>inquiry</span> dominates and structures Confessions 1–10. I draw connections between the dramatic opening lines of book 1 and the climactic discussion in book 10.26–38 and argue that the latter discussion contains Augustine's resolution of the paradox of <span class='Hi'>inquiry</span> as it applies to the special case of (...)
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  19. Therese Scarpelli Cory (2012). Diachronically Unified Consciousness in Augustine and Aquinas. Vivarium 2012 (3):354-81.score: 24.0
    Medieval accounts of diachronically unifed consciousness have been overlooked by contemporary readers, because medieval thinkers have a unique and unexpected way of setting up the problem. This paper examines the approach to diachronically unified consciousness that is found in Augustine’s and Aquinas’s treatments of memory. For Augustine, although the mind is “distended” by time, it remains resilient, stretching across disparate moments to unify past, present, and future in a single personal present. Despite deceptively different phrasing, Aquinas develops a (...)
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  20. Jason W. Carter (2011). St. Augustine on Time, Time Numbers, and Enduring Objects. Vivarium 49 (4):301-323.score: 24.0
    Abstract Throughout his works, St. Augustine offers at least nine distinct views on the nature of time, at least three of which have remained almost unnoticed in the secondary literature. I first examine each these nine descriptions of time and attempt to diffuse common misinterpretations, especially of the views which seek to identify Augustinian time as consisting of an un-extended point or a distentio animi . Second, I argue that Augustine's primary understanding of time, like that of later (...)
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  21. David Decosimo (2010). Just Lies: Finding Augustine's Ethics of Public Lying in His Treatments of Lying and Killing. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):661-697.score: 24.0
    Augustine famously defends the justice of killing in certain public contexts such as just wars. He also claims that private citizens who intentionally kill are guilty of murder, regardless of their reasons. Just as famously, Augustine seems to prohibit lying categorically. Analyzing these features of his thought and their connections, I argue that Augustine is best understood as endorsing the justice of lying in certain public contexts, even though he does not explicitly do so. Specifically, I show (...)
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  22. Michael Gorman (2005). Augustine's Use of Neoplatonism in Confessions VII: A Response to Peter King. Modern Schoolman 82 (3):227-233.score: 24.0
    A modified version of Michael Gorman's comments on Peter King’s paper at the 2004 Henle Conference. Above all, an account of Augustine’s purposes in discussing Neoplatonism in Confessions VII, showing why Augustine does not tell us certain things we wish he would. In my commentary I will address the following topics: (i) what it means to speak of the philosophically interesting points in Augustine; (ii) whether Confessions VII is really about the Trinity; (iii) Augustine‘s intentions in (...)
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  23. Kathleen Roberts Skerrett (2009). Consuetudo Carnalis in Augustine's Confessions: Confessing Identity/Belonging to Difference. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (3):495-512.score: 24.0
    The political theorist William E. Connolly reads Augustine's Confessions as an exhortation to deny the paradox of identity/difference. The paradox for Connolly is this: if one confesses a true identity, one must be false to difference, but if one is true to difference, one must sacrifice the promise of true identity. I revisit Augustine's Confessions here in order to offer a reading of their paradoxical character that contrasts with Connolly's. I will argue that Augustine's confession does not (...)
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  24. Kevin Carnahan (2008). Perturbations of the Soul and Pains of the Body: Augustine on Evil Suffered and Done in War. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (2):269-294.score: 24.0
    Many contemporary scholars debate whether war should be conceived as a relative evil or a morally neutral act. The works of Augustine may offer new ways of thinking through the categories of this debate. In an early period, Augustine develops the distinction between evil done and evil suffered. Augustine's early treatments of war locate the saint as detached sage doing only good, and immune from evil suffered. In a middle period, he develops a richer picture of the (...)
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  25. Barry Clarke & Lawrence Quill (2009). Augustine, Arendt, and Anthropy. Sophia 48 (3):253-265.score: 24.0
    Arendt’s theoretical influence is generally traced to Heidegger and experientially to the traumatic events that occurred in Europe during the Second World War. Here, we suggest that Arendt’s conception of politics may be usefully enriched via a proto-anthropic principle found in Augustine and adopted by Arendt throughout her writings. By appealing to this anthropic principle; that without a spectator there could be no world; a profound connection is made between the ‘cosmic jackpot’ of life in the universe and the (...)
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  26. Stephen Gersh (2012). The First Principles of Latin Neoplatonism: Augustine, Macrobius, Boethius. Vivarium 50 (2):113-138.score: 24.0
    This essay attempts to provide more evidence for the notions that there actually is a Latin (as opposed to a Greek) Neoplatonic tradition in late antiquity, that this tradition includes a systematic theory of first principles, and that this tradition and theory are influential in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. The method of the essay is intended to be novel in that, instead of examining authors or works in a chronological sequence and attempting to isolate doctrines in the traditional (...)
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  27. Laurent Cesalli & Nadja Germann (2008). Signification and Truth Epistemology at the Crossroads of Semantics and Ontology in Augustine's Early Philosophical Writings. Vivarium 46 (2):123-154.score: 24.0
    This article is about the conception of truth and signification in Augustine's early philosophical writings. In the first, semantic-linguistic part, the gradual shift of Augustine's position towards the Academics is treated closely. It reveals that Augustine develops a notion of sign which, by integrating elements of Stoic epistemology, is suited to function as a transmitter of true knowledge through linguistic expressions. In the second part, both the ontological structure of signified (sensible) things and Augustine's solution to (...)
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  28. Derek A. McDougall (2008). Pictures, Privacy, Augustine, and the Mind. Journal of Philosophical Research 33 (1):33-72.score: 24.0
    This paper weaves together a number of separate strands each relating to an aspect of Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations. The first strand introduces his radical and incoherent idea of a private object. Wittgenstein in § 258 and related passages is not investigating a perfectly ordinary notion of first person privacy; but his critics have treated his question, whether a private language is possible, solely in terms of their quite separate question of how our ordinary sensation terms can be understood, in a (...)
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  29. Clare Palmer (2011). Animal Disenhancement and the Non-Identity Problem: A Response to Thompson. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 5 (1):43-48.score: 24.0
    In his paper The Opposite of Human Enhancement: Nanotechnology and the Blind Chicken problem (Nanoethics 2:305–316, 2008) Paul Thompson argues that the possibility of disenhancing animals in order to improve animal welfare poses a philosophical conundrum. Although many people intuitively think such disenhancement would be morally impermissible, it’s difficult to find good arguments to support such intuitions. In this brief response to Thompson, I accept that there’s a conundrum here. But I argue that if we seriously consider whether (...)
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  30. James K. A. Smith (2011). Formation, Grace, and Pneumatology: Or, Where's the Spirit in Gregory's Augustine? Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):556-569.score: 24.0
    Eric Gregory's Politics and the Order of Love takes up an audacious project: enlisting Saint Augustine in order to "help imagine a better liberalism." This article first provides a summary of Gregory's argument, focusing on his emphasis on love as a "motivation" for neighborly care, and hence democratic participation. This involves tracing the theme of motivation in the book, which is tied to his articulation of liberal perfectionism and an emphasis on civic virtue. In conclusion I raise the question (...)
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  31. Gilbert Meilaender (2001). Sweet Necessities: Food, Sex, and Saint Augustine. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (1):3 - 18.score: 24.0
    Central to Augustine's understanding of rightly ordered sexuality is his belief that the pleasure of the act should not be separated from its good (procreation). It is useful to observe that he reasons in a similar way about eating: that the pleasure of eating should not be separated from its good (nourishment). Inadequacies in his understanding of the purpose of food and eating may be instructive when we think about inadequacies in his understanding of sex. If there is more (...)
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  32. Arianna Ferrari (2012). Animal Disenhancement for Animal Welfare: The Apparent Philosophical Conundrums and the Real Exploitation of Animals. A Response to Thompson and Palmer. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 6 (1):65-76.score: 24.0
    Abstract In his paper “The Opposite of Human Enhancement: Nanotechnology and the Blind Chicken problem” ( Nanoethics 2: 305-36, 2008) Thompson argued that technological attempts to reduce or eliminate selected non-human animals’ capabilities (animal disenhancements) in order to solve or mitigate animal welfare problems in animals’ use pose a philosophical conundrum, because there is a contradiction between rational arguments in favor of these technological interventions and intuitions against them. In her response “Animal Disenhancement and the Non-Identity Problem: A Response (...)
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  33. John Immerwahr (2008). Augustine's Advice for College Teachers: Ever Ancient, Ever New. Metaphilosophy 39 (4-5):656-665.score: 24.0
    Abstract: St. Augustine's short treatise Instructing Beginners in Faith ( De Catechizandis Rudibus ) is one of his less well known works, but it provides some fascinating insights on pedagogy that are applicable to college teaching. For Augustine, education is best understood as a relationship of love, where teacher and learner function in a reciprocal system. If the teacher is enthusiastic, the students respond, drawing even more energy from the teacher. If the teacher is dull, or if the (...)
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  34. Changchi Hao (2011). Lao-Zhuang and Augustine on the Issue of Suspension in the Philosophy of Religion. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):75-99.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses the question why the issue of reason and evidence as the central concern in the mainstream contemporary philosophy of religion has to be displaced by the issue of suspension according to Lao-Zhuang and the Augustine of Hippo. For both Lao-Zhuang and Augustine, in making room for the Other to appear at the core of the self’s being, it shows that there is an inseparable relationship of the self to the Other. In suspending its own understanding, (...)
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  35. Lee A. McBride (2012). Agrarian Ideals and Practices: Comments on Paul B. Thompson's The Agrarian Vision. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):535-541.score: 24.0
    In The Agrarian Vision , Thompson argues that a better appreciation of agrarian ideals could lead to a more virtuous, more sustainable way of life. While I agree with Thompson in many respects, there are some aspects of the book that I question and others that I would like to hear Thompson explicate in greater detail. In this paper, I question Thompson’s claim that agrarian farmers and farming communities serve as ideal models of virtuous habits and (...)
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  36. Lucy Tatman (2013). Arendt and Augustine: More Than One Kind of Love. Sophia 52 (4):625-635.score: 24.0
    Although Hannah Arendt is not usually read as a philosopher of religion, her political philosophy is noticeably filled with references to religious figures and thinkers, including Jesus of Nazareth, Augustine and Duns Scotus. Also notable is the implicit centrality in her thought of amor mundi, or love of the world. The difficulty is that although she spoke to her students about it, she rarely wrote about amor mundi. In this article, I seek to provide a plausible explanation of the (...)
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  37. James Wetzel (2004). Splendid Vices and Secular Virtues: Variations on Milbank's Augustine. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (2):271 - 300.score: 24.0
    John Milbank's case against secular reason draws much of its authority and force from Augustine's critique of pagan virtue. "Theology and Social Theory" could be characterized, without too much insult to either Augustine or Milbank, as a postmodern "City of God". Modern preoccupations with secular virtues, marketplace values, and sociological bottom-lines are likened there to classically pagan preoccupations with the virtues of self-conquest and conquest over others. Against both modern and antique "ontological violence" (where 'to be' is 'to (...)
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  38. Bonnie Kent (2013). Augustine's On the Good of Marriage and Infused Virtue in the Twelfth Century. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):112-136.score: 24.0
    In the history of ethics, it remains remains unclear how Christians of the Middle Ages came to see God-given virtues as dispositions (habitus) created in the human soul. Patristic works could surely support other conceptions of the virtues given by grace. For example, one might argue that all such virtues are forms of charity, so that they must be affections of the soul, or that they consist in what the soul does, not anything the soul has. Scholars usually assume that (...)
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  39. David J. Dunn (2012). Radical Sophiology: Fr. Sergej Bulgakov and John Milbank on Augustine. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 64 (3-4):227-249.score: 24.0
    Looking at John Milbank's recent turn to Fr. Sergej Bulgakov, this paper argues that the theological and philosophical commitments they share are overshadowed by a deeper difference concerning the role each assigns the church in secular culture. It turns to Milbank's roots in Augustine's philosophy of history, which he argues could have allowed the church to overtake the pagan (which founds the secular) were it not for his distinction between the "visible" church and its deferred (eschatological) perfection. Bulgakov also (...)
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  40. J. Warren Smith (2007). Augustine and the Limits of Preemptive and Preventive War. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (1):141 - 162.score: 24.0
    While Michael Walzer's distinction between preemptive and preventive wars offers important categories for current reflection upon the Bush Doctrine and the invasion of Iraq, it is often treated as a modern distinction without antecedent in the classical Christian just war tradition. This paper argues to the contrary that within Augustine's corpus there are passages in which he speaks about the use of violence in situations that we would classify today as preemptive and preventive military action. While I do not (...)
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  41. Therese Scarpelli Cory (2012). Diachronically Unified Consciousness in Augustine and Aquinas. Vivarium 50 (3-4):354-381.score: 24.0
    Medieval accounts of diachronically unified consciousness have been overlooked by contemporary readers, because medieval thinkers have a unique and unexpected way of setting up the problem. This paper examines the approach to diachronically unified consciousness that is found in Augustine’s and Aquinas’s treatments of memory. For Augustine, although the mind is “distended” by time, it remains resilient, stretching across disparate moments to unify past, present, and future in a single personal present. Despite deceptively different phrasing, Aquinas develops a (...)
     
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  42. Peter King & Nathan Ballantyne (2009). Augustine on Testimony. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):pp. 195-214.score: 21.0
  43. Charles Sayward (2005). Thompson Clarke and the Problem of Other Minds. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (1):1-14.score: 21.0
    The force of sceptical inquiries into out knowledge of other people is a paradigm of the force that philosophical views can have. Sceptical views arise out of philosophical inquiries that are identical in all major respects with inquiries that we employ in ordinary cases. These inquiries employ perfectly mundane methods of making and assessing claims to know. This paper tries to show that these inquiries are conducted in cases that lack certain contextual ingredients found in ordinary cases. The paper concludes (...)
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  44. Mateusz Stróżyński (2013). There is No Searching for the Self: Self-Knowledge in Book Ten of Augustine's De Trinitate. Phronesis 58 (3):280-300.score: 21.0
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  45. Author unknown, Augustine. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  46. Donald Capps (2007). Augustine's Confessions: The Story of a Divided Self and the Process of its Unification. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):127-150.score: 21.0
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  47. Gianfranco Fioravanti (2011). Augustine. History of Philosophy and «Tempora Christiana». Rivista di Filosofia 102 (3):347-362.score: 21.0
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  48. Kelly E. Arenson (2013). Augustine's Defense and Redemption of the Body. Studia Patristica 70:529-37.score: 21.0
     
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  49. Alain Epp Weaver (2001). Unjust Lies, Just Wars? A Christian Pacifist Conversation with Augustine. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (1):51-78.score: 21.0
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