Search results for 'Aural' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  14
    James Rogers & Geoffrey K. Pullum (2011). Aural Pattern Recognition Experiments and the Subregular Hierarchy. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20 (3):329-342.
    We explore the formal foundations of recent studies comparing aural pattern recognition capabilities of populations of human and non-human animals. To date, these experiments have focused on the boundary between the Regular and Context-Free stringsets. We argue that experiments directed at distinguishing capabilities with respect to the Subregular Hierarchy, which subdivides the class of Regular stringsets, are likely to provide better evidence about the distinctions between the cognitive mechanisms of humans and those of other species. Moreover, the classes of (...)
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  2.  2
    Franklin M. Berry, Douglas K. Detterman & Thomas Mulhern (1973). Stimulus Encoding as a Function of Modality: Aural Versus Visual Paired-Associate Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (1):140-142.
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  3.  13
    Diana Boros (2012). Public Art as Aural Installation: Surprising Musical Intervention as Civic Rejuvenation in Urban Life. Evental Aesthetics 1 (3):50-81.
    Surprising artistic interventions in the landscape of the public everyday are psychologically, socially, and politically beneficial to individuals as well as their communities. Such interventions enable their audiences to access moments of surprising inspiration, self-reflection, and revitalization. These spontaneous moments may offer access to the experience of distance from the rational “self,” allowing the irrational and purely emotive that resides within all of us to assert itself. It is this sensual instinct that all we too frequently push aside, particularly in (...)
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  4. Barry Blesser & Linda-Ruth Salter (2006). Spaces Speak, Are You Listening?: Experiencing Aural Architecture. The MIT Press.
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  5.  49
    Andy Hamilton (2007). Music and the Aural Arts. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):46-63.
    The visual arts include painting, sculpture, photography, video, and film. But many people would argue that music is the universal or only art of sound. In the modernist era, Western art music has incorporated unpitched sounds or ‘noise’, and I pursue the question of whether this process allows space for a non-musical soundart. Are there non-musical arts of sound—is there an art phonography, for instance, to parallel art photography? At the same time, I attempt a characterization of music, contrasting acoustic, (...)
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  6.  1
    Eugene Eoyang (1979). Beyond Visual and Aural Criteria: The Importance of Flavor in Chinese Literary Criticism. Critical Inquiry 6 (1):99-106.
    "The essence of literature may be compared to the various plants and trees," Liu Hseih writes, "alike in the fact that they are rooted in the soil, yet different in their flavor and their fragrance, their exposure to the sun."1 The character of each work is manifest in its unique savor and in its scent. In other works, the uniqueness of a work can be savored: texts may echo other works, but the personality of any work is instantaneously verified by (...)
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  7.  1
    Brian Lightbody (2009). Leaving the Island of Cyclops : Practicing an Aural Genealogy Within the Surrealist Community of Fellowship. In Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, Corrado Federici & Ernesto Virgulti (eds.), Disguise, Deception, Trompe-L'oeil: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Peter Lang 99--115.
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  8.  2
    D. T. Evans (2005). Speaking Over and Above the Plot: Aural Fixation, Scopophilia, Opera and the Gay Sensibility. Theory, Culture and Society 22 (2):99-119.
    The relationship between opera and gay subcultures , lifestyle practices and consumerism has been noted by cultural critics and musicologists - the former in affirmative terms, the latter largely hostile. This article explores this relationship initially through a review of the existing literature before concentrating on the striking affinities in the discursive construction of both cultural forms. In the modern era, both opera and homosexuality have been stigmatized and marginalized in their respective rationalizing ‘scientific’ domains: musicology and sexology. Both have (...)
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  9.  1
    Charles L. Richman & Leon Lorenc (1974). Effects of Overtraining on Reversal and Half-Reversal Shift Performance Employing Aural Stimuli. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (5):503-504.
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  10. Mimmo Peruffo (2012). Part III-The Aural Dimension-7 Balance on the Lute: The Role of the Strings. Proceedings of the British Academy 176:135.
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  11. James Rogers & Geoffrey Pullum (forthcoming). Forthcoming. Aural Pattern Recognition Experiments and the Subregular Hierarchy. Journal of Logic, Language and Information. Paper Presented at the 10th Meeting of the Association for Mathematics of Language In.
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  12. L. G. Whitehead (1896). A Study of Visual and Aural Memory Processes. Philosophical Review 5:429.
     
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  13. Kathleen Akins (1993). What is It Like to Be Boring and Myopic? In B. Dahlbom (ed.), Dennett and His Critics. Blackwell
  14.  1
    Gary M. Ingersoll & Francis J. Di Vesta (1972). Effects of Modality Preferences on Performance on a Bisensory Missing-Units Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (2):386.
  15.  2
    Douglas Griffith & William A. Johnston (1973). An Information-Processing Analysis of Visual Imagery. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):141.
  16.  1
    Sylvia F. Kollasch & Donald H. Kausler (1972). Recognition Learning of Homophones. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):432-434.
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  17. Emily Thompson (2004). The Soundscape of Modernity: Architectural Acoustics and the Culture of Listening in America, 1900-1933. The MIT Press.
    A vibrant history of acoustical technology and aural culture in early-twentieth-century America.
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  18.  40
    Murray Jardine (2009). Bill Poteat's Post-Critical Logic and the Origins of Modernity. Tradition and Discovery 36 (2):54-58.
    In Polanyian Meditations: In Search of a Post-Critical Logic, Poteat draws upon Polanyi to explicate what he calls an “oral/aural logic,” which he thinks informs Polanyi’s thought and which is different from the conventional “visual logic” of the Western philosophical tradition, and then argues that this oral/aural logic is implied in the Hebraic understanding of reality. This idea is a key to understanding the genesis of the modern worldview, which can be conceptualized as involving certain elements of the (...)
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  19.  5
    Steven Pustay (2015). Love's Old Song Will Be New: Deleuze, Busby Berkeley and Becoming-Music. Film-Philosophy 19:172-189.
    This article argues that Busby Berkeley’s unique musical spectacles invert the cinematic taxonomy found in Deleuze’s twin volumes on Cinema through the process of ‘becoming-music.’ By taking up a form that I term ‘visual-music,’ in which musical properties are incorporated within the image, Berkeley’s work problematizes Deleuze’s philosophy of cinematic sound and benefits instead from the conceptions of the musical refrain and rhythm located in Deleuze and Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus. Breaking away from traditional Deleuzian readings of cinema, I demonstrate, (...)
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  20.  41
    Jerrold Levinson (1997). Music in the Moment. Cornell University Press.
    Does aural understanding depend upon reflective awareness of musical architecture or large-scale musical structure? Jerrold Levinson thinks not.
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  21.  20
    William F. Thompson, Philip W. Graham & Frank A. Russo (2005). Seeing Music Performance: Visual Influences on Perception and Experience. Semiotica 156 (1/4):203-227.
    Drawing from ethnographic, empirical, and historical/cultural perspectives, we examine the extent to which visual aspects of music contribute to the communication that takes place between performers and their listeners. First, we introduce a framework for understanding how media and genres shape aural and visual experiences of music. Second, we present case studies of two performances, and describe the relation between visual and aural aspects of performance. Third, we report empirical evidence that visual aspects of performance reliably influence perceptions (...)
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  22.  22
    Robert S. Root-Bernstein (2002). Aesthetic Cognition. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (1):61 – 77.
    The purpose of this article is to integrate two outstanding problems within the philosophy of science. The first concerns what role aesthetics plays in scientific thinking. The second is the problem of how logically testable ideas are generated (the so-called "psychology of research" versus "logic of (dis)proof" problem). I argue that aesthetic sensibility is the basis for what scientists often call intuition, and that intuition in turn embodies (in a literal physiological sense) ways of thinking that have their own meta-logic. (...)
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  23.  79
    John R. Gregg, Time Consciousness and the Specious Present.
    Roger Penrose, in _The Emperor's New Mind_ (1989), writes about the way Mozart perceived music. Mozart did not play a piece in his mind in real time, or even speeded up, but could hold it before him all at once. We all do this, although usually for much shorter riffs than entire symphonies. I have argued that the all-at-onceness of our thoughts and perceptions is at least as inexplicable as what it is like to see red; I think the (...)/temporal all-at-onceness makes the point at least as vividly as the visual/spatial all-at-onceness of the curl of smoke in an art nouveau poster. (shrink)
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  24.  19
    Erkki Huovinen (2013). Concatenationism and Anti‐Architectonicism in Musical Understanding. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):247-260.
    This article discusses Jerrold Levinson's theory of concatenationism, which emphasizes the moment-by-moment character of musical listeners’ basic musical understanding, and the related project of anti-architectonicism, which denies the influence of large-scale music-structural information on basic musical understanding. A reconstruction of Levinson's position reveals him to embrace a qualified architectonicism himself and shows that his remaining anti-architectonicism is afflicted with several problems. While the conceptual distinction Levinson draws between a piece of music and its structure as well as his three “intuitions (...)
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  25.  9
    David Cecchetto (2013). The Sonic Effect: Aurality and Digital Networks in Exurbia. Evental Aesthetics 2 (2):34-62.
    This essay examines the problem of medial specificity in music and sound art, giving particular attention to Seth Kim-Cohen’s call for a non-cochlear sound art based on the notion of “expansion” that has been decisive in visual arts discourses. I argue that Kim-Cohen’s non-cochlear intervention in In the Blink of an Ear might be productively pressured towards the concept of a “sonic effect” that acknowledges the material-discursive particularity of sound without recourse to the phenomenological claims of authenticity that Kim-Cohen correctly (...)
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  26.  4
    Uwe C. Steiner (2015). Vom Gegenstand zur Gegenständlichkeit des Sozialen Georg Simmels »Soziologie der Sinne« und das Hören im Zeitalter der technischen Reproduzierbarkeit von Musik. Zeitschrift für Kulturphilosophie 2015 (1-2):107-119.
    Simmel's Sociology explores elementary processes of socialization or collectivization. Thus, the sociology of the senses examines how sight, hearing, feeling, smelling and tasting contributes to constituting societies. Though Simmel observes that modern refined civilization diminishes the depths of the senses but increases its emphasis or enhancement with lust or aversion, the conclusion cannot be avoided that the artifacts and technologies of hearing have to be examined. Accordingly, this article can be regarded as a case study in the wake of Simmel: (...)
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  27. S. Arkette (2004). Sounds Like City. Theory, Culture and Society 21 (1):159-168.
    Our cultural climate is increasingly dependent upon visual space. Media and communication for the most part are exemplified through television and the Internet. Aural space has, for the moment, become an ambient presence. The aim of this article is to develop a phenomenological approach to interpreting our sonic environment by drawing upon a range of sound-scape theorists. I will, in some cases, provide a counter-argument to established theses, and in doing so endeavour to open up fresh debate for future (...)
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  28.  20
    Richard Kenneth Atkins (2013). Toward an Objective Phenomenological Vocabulary: How Seeing a Scarlet Red is Like Hearing a Trumpet's Blare. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):837-858.
    Nagel’s challenge is to devise an objective phenomenological vocabulary that can describe the objective structural similarities between aural and visual perception. My contention is that Charles Sanders Peirce’s little studied and less understood phenomenological vocabulary makes a significant contribution to meeting this challenge. I employ Peirce’s phenomenology to identify the structural isomorphism between seeing a scarlet red and hearing a trumpet’s blare. I begin by distinguishing between the vividness of an experience and the intensity of a quality. I proceed (...)
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  29.  8
    James Hill (1998). Concepts of Secondary Qualities. Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 5 (Supplement):91-98.
    The properties of secondary qualities have recently become an object of interest again in analytic philosophy; it is generally assumed that secondary qualities - in the mind at least - tend to be irreducible to the physical: taste, smell, color perception, the aural, & the tactile all seem to be more subjectively perceived than most other qualities. This is shown to present such topics as realism vs anti-realism, description, & truth-value with a series of problems, which are then discussed. (...)
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  30.  7
    Jacqueline Loeb (2011). Dissonance Rising: Subversive Sound in Zhang Yimou's Raise the Red Lantern. Film-Philosophy 15 (1):204-219.
    This article presents an analysis of visual-acoustic dissonance in Raise The Red Lantern ( Dà Hóng Dēnglóng Gāogāo Guà , Zhang Yimou, 1991). Drawing upon Michel Foucault's discussion of the Panopticon, this study argues that the camera in this film represents a panoptic entity whose subversion can only be achieved by means outside the visual economy. Sound is that means; the aural regime works consistently to unhinge the balance of the optical machinery on both a thematic and cinematographic level. (...)
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  31.  4
    A. Staley Groves (2011). The Poetry of Adam Staley Groves. Introduction by Vincent W.J. Van Gerven Oei. Continent 1 (1):52-59.
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 52-59. Introduction Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei Adam Staley Groves is a poet of thought. I say this with the greatest sincerity. Hence a thorough reading of even this small selection of his work in the length of an introduction is impossible. Such is the diligent reader’s task! Nevertheless, my choice for Staley Groves, like all choices, demands a justification, which I would like to formulate as follows. Staley Groves fits in the heroic tradition of poets (...)
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  32.  2
    Catharine R. Stimpson (1977). The Mind, the Body, and Gertrude Stein. Critical Inquiry 3 (3):489-506.
    However, Stein's self-images are more than appropriations of a male identity and masculine interests. Several of them are irrelevant to categories of sex and gender. In part, Stein is an obsessive psychologist, a Euclid of behavior, searching for "bottom natures," the substratum of individuality. She also tries to diagram psychic genotypes, patterns into which all individuals might fit. Although she plays with femaleness/maleness as categories, she also investigates an opposition of impetuousness and passivity, fire and phlegm; a variety of regional (...)
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  33.  2
    F. G. Asenjo (2003). Continua Without Sets. Logic and Logical Philosophy 1:95-128.
    Initially, we perceive an indefinite extension imprecisely, a spread C ; this perception can be visual, aural, or tactile.
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  34.  1
    Donald Juel (1997). The Strange Silence of the Bible. Interpretation 51 (1):5-19.
    The oral/aural power of the Bible has been strangely neglected within the worship life of the church as well as in recent biblical scholarship. In order to recover the Bible's power to take captive the imagination of readers and interpreters, we must once again attend to the public reading, or performance, of the Bible.
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  35. Fernando Muniz (forthcoming). Performance e Élenkhos no Íon de Platão. Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental.
    No Íon, a autoridade e a sabedoria de poetas e rapsodos são confrontadas por meios indiretos. O caráter oblíquo dessa estratégia impede o acesso direto ao conteúdo do diálogo e provoca inúmeros equívocos de leitura. Um fato contextual estimula mais ainda leituras equivocadas. A poesia tratada no Íon difere muito da forma como nós, modernos, a entendemos. Na Antiguidade grega, de base aural, a poesia era o modo privilegiado de conservação da tradição herdada, e permaneceu exercendo essa função capital (...)
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  36.  1
    Nirmal Puwar (2007). Architectures de la mémoire. Multitudes 2 (2):87-99.
    This article moves through the tempo of visual and aural inventories that float in and out of the making of a film based project on public spheres within a post-war post-colonial landscape. Seeking a set of conversations which offer clues to the inhabitation and production of public spheres within the zone of cinemas, the article considers the creative process at play in the writing of these iterative histories of the very ways in which cities are imagined, lost and perhaps (...)
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  37. Jane Geaney (1996). Language and Sense Discrimination in Ancient China. Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    The dissertation examines the intersection of language and sense discrimination in the texts of classical Chinese philosophy . Through an analysis of the figures of speech related to language and sense discrimination, it argues that the pair 'aural and visual' forms a significant dualism within the Chinese cosmos. ;The significance of the aural/visual dualism is threefold. First, it clarifies classical Chinese epistemology. The dissertation argues that classical Chinese epistemology is a matter of matching many levels of parallels between (...)
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  38.  8
    Andrew Hugill (2008). The Digital Musician. Routledge.
    New technologies, new musicians -- Aural awareness -- Organizing sound -- Creating music -- Performing -- Cultural context -- Critical engagement -- The digital musician -- Projects and performance.
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  39. Jan Jagodzinski (2010). Visual Art and Education in an Era of Designer Capitalism: Deconstructing the Oral Eye. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The oral eye is a metaphor for the dominance of global designer capitalism. It refers to the consumerism of a designer aesthetic by the ‘I’ of the neoliberalist subject, as well as the aural soundscapes that accompany the hegemony of the capturing attention through screen cultures. An attempt is made to articulate the historical emergence of such a synoptic machinic regime drawing on Badiou, Bellmer, Deleuze, Guattari, Lacan, Rancière, Virilio, Ziarek, and Žižek to explore contemporary art (post-Situationism) and visual (...)
     
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  40.  2
    Murray Jardine (1998). Speech and Political Practice: Recovering the Place of Human Responsibility. State University of New York Press.
    Argues that rebuilding ethical communities will require a cultural reorientation from visually dominated to oral/aural experience and develops a speech-based conception of moral place that can set limits on the actions of individuals and communities.
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  41.  1
    Marcia Landy (2015). Cinema and Counter-History. Indiana University Press.
    Despite claims about the end of history and the death of cinema, visual media continue to contribute to our understanding of history and history-making. In this book, Marcia Landy argues that rethinking history and memory must take into account shifting conceptions of visual and aural technologies. With the assistance of thinkers such as Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Cinema and Counter-History examines writings and films that challenge prevailing notions of history in order to explore the philosophic, aesthetic, and political (...)
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  42. Marcia Landy (2015). Cinema and Counter-History. Indiana University Press.
    Despite claims about the end of history and the death of cinema, visual media continue to contribute to our understanding of history and history-making. In this book, Marcia Landy argues that rethinking history and memory must take into account shifting conceptions of visual and aural technologies. With the assistance of thinkers such as Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Cinema and Counter-History examines writings and films that challenge prevailing notions of history in order to explore the philosophic, aesthetic, and political (...)
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  43. Marcia Landy (2015). Cinema and Counter-History. Indiana University Press.
    Despite claims about the end of history and the death of cinema, visual media continue to contribute to our understanding of history and history-making. In this book, Marcia Landy argues that rethinking history and memory must take into account shifting conceptions of visual and aural technologies. With the assistance of thinkers such as Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Cinema and Counter-History examines writings and films that challenge prevailing notions of history in order to explore the philosophic, aesthetic, and political (...)
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  44. William Poteat (1990). A Philosophical Daybook: Post-Critical Investigations. University of Missouri.
    It must strive to defeat our centuries-old habituation to the book as spectacle, in order that we may be brought to dwell in the immediacies of our lively selves in the world, as we do in our oral/aural life.
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  45. John Richardson, Claudia Gorbman & Carol Vernallis (eds.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of New Audiovisual Aesthetics. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This handbook offers new ways to read the audiovisual. In the media landscapes of today, conglomerates jockey for primacy and the internet increasingly places media in the hands of individuals-producing the range of phenomena from movie blockbuster to YouTube aesthetics. Media forms and genres are proliferating and interpenetrating, from movies, music and other entertainments streaming on computers and iPods to video games and wireless phones. The audiovisual environment of everyday life, too-from street to stadium to classroom-would at times be hardly (...)
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  46. Catharine R. Stimpson (1988). Nancy Reagan Wears a Hat: Feminism and Its Cultural Consensus. Critical Inquiry 14 (2):223-243.
    Like every great word, “representation/s “ is a stew. A scrambled menu, it serves up several meanings at once. For a representation can be an image—visual, verbal, or aural. Think of a picture of a hat. A representation can also be a narrative, a sequence of images and ideas. Think of the sentence, “Nancy Reagan wore a hat when she visited a detoxification clinic in Florida.” Or, a representation can be the product of ideology, that vast scheme for showing (...)
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