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  1. Austin Harrington (2012). Weimar Social Theory and the Fragmentation of European World Pictures. Thesis Eleven 111 (1):66-80.
    Criticism of ‘the West’ and of ‘Western civilization’ in Germany in the early 20th century is generally most familiar today as a conservative force of the age. It is well-known that at the outbreak of war in August 1914 a longstanding German complex of resentment of the Western European powers exploded in a call to arms. Yet it needs to be stressed that not all prominent German bourgeois writers endorsed a wholly militant reading of the motif of German national-cultural ‘protest (...)
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  2. Austin Harrington & David Roberts (2012). Introduction: Weimar Social Theory The 'Crisis of Classical Modernity' Revisited. Thesis Eleven 111 (1):3-8.
    The collapse of the Weimar Republic remains central to the history of the 20th century and to contemporary debates on 'classical modernity' and its Europe-wide crisis in the wake of the First World War. The present issue of Thesis Eleven focuses on three dimensions of the Weimar crisis: the experience of fundamental societal crisis and closure and its diagnostic power in relation to the rise of fascist movements; the cognitive and normative resources that sought to work against this crisis-ridden sense (...)
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  3. Austin Harrington (2009). 'Messianicity' in Social Theory? A Critique of a Thesis of Jacques Derrida. Thesis Eleven 98 (1):52-68.
    Jacques Derrida's vision of 'messianicity' in his book Specters of Marx and the essay 'Faith and Knowledge: The Two Sources of “Religion” at the Limits of Reason Alone' has been widely appreciated by scholars. Yet little fundamentally critical engagement appears to have been made with some important historical-sociological questions raised by Derrida's ideas in these texts. Drawing on earlier reference-points in 20th-century critical theory and sociology, the present article argues for some objections to Derrida's presentation of the significance of religious (...)
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  4. Austin Harrington (2008). Theological History and the Legitimacy of the Modern Social Sciences: Considerations on the Work of Hans Blumenberg. Thesis Eleven 94 (1):6-28.
    This article explores the much neglected work of the German philosopher and cultural theorist Hans Blumenberg, a figure still relatively little known in the Anglophone world. The thesis is defended that Blumenberg's conception of The Legitimacy of the Modern Age (1966) offers valuable resources for addressing some important questions about the philosophical self-understanding of the modern social sciences in relation to theological and religious sources of thought and language. The article begins with an assessment of the contemporary relevance of Blumenberg's (...)
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  5. Austin Harrington (2007). Alfred Weber's Essay `The Civil Servant' and Kafka's `In the Penal Colony': The Evidence of an Influence. History of the Human Sciences 20 (3):41-63.
    In 1977 a German literary scholar, Astrid Lange-Kirchheim, published an article announcing an astonishing discovery: credible evidence exists to suggest that Kafka's famous disturbing short story, `In the Penal Colony', published in 1919 but first written in 1914, echoes and reworks, in several of its key images and turns of phrase, elements of an essay published in 1910 in the German literary magazine, Die neue Rundschau, bearing the title `Der Beamte' (`The Civil Servant', or `The Official' or `The Functionary') by (...)
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  6. Austin Harrington (2007). Habermas's Theological Turn? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (1):45–61.
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  7. Austin Harrington (2006). Hermann Broch as a Reader of Max Weber: Protestantism, Rationalization and the 'Disintegration of Values'. History of the Human Sciences 19 (4):1-18.
    The article explores a range of motifs in the writing of the Austrian émigré novelist and essayist Hermann Broch, that point to themes in the sociological thought of Max Weber. Although explicit citations of Weber’s name appear rarely in Broch’s writings, the thematic and stylistic contents of Broch’s first novel of 1930-1 The Sleepwalkers indicate a plethora of ways in which the Austrian author engages with ideas he can only have first assimilated by means of a more or less conscious (...)
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  8. Austin Harrington (2006). Social Theory and Theology. In Gerard Delanty (ed.), The Handbook of Contemporary European Social Theory. Routledge. 37.
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  9. Austin Harrington (2004). Classical Social Theory, I: Contexts and Beginnings. In , Modern Social Theory: An Introduction. Oup Oxford.
  10. Austin Harrington (2004). Conclution: Social Theory for the Twenty-First Century. In , Modern Social Theory: An Introduction. Oup Oxford.
     
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  11. Austin Harrington (ed.) (2004). Modern Social Theory: An Introduction. OUP Oxford.
    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the core topics, theories and debates in modern social theory. -/- Fourteen chapters have been written by leading specialists in the field, providing up-to-date guidance on the full sweep of the modern sociological imagination, from the legacies of the classical figures of Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel and Parsons to the work of cutting-edge contemporary theorists. Separate chapters discuss functionalism and its critics, interpretive and interactionist theory, historical social theory, western Marxism, psychoanalytic social theory, (...)
     
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  12. Austin harrington (2003). Divided, Not-United. Angelaki 8 (1):109 – 118.
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  13. Mark Bevir, Mark Erickson, Austin Harrington & Andreas Reckwitz (2002). Constructing the Past: Review Symposium on Bevir's The Logic of the History of Ideas. History of the Human Sciences 15 (2):99-133.
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  14. Austin Harrington (2000). A Kind of Fieldwork in Our Ongoing Practices of Enlightenment. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):125-130.
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  15. Austin Harrington (2000). Objectivism in Hermeneutics? Gadamer, Habermas, Dilthey. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (4):491-507.
    Gadamer and Habermas both argue that some earlier theorists of interpretation in the human sciences, despite recognizing the meaningful character of social reality, still succumb to objectivism because they fail to conceive the relation of interpreters to their subjects in terms of cross-cultural normative “dialogue.” In particular, Gadamer and Habermas claim that the most prominent nineteenth-century philosopher of the human sciences, Wilhelm Dilthey, fell prey to a misleading Cartesian outlook which sought to ground the objectivity of interpretation on complete transcendence (...)
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  16. Austin Harrington (1999). Some Problems with Gadamer's and Habermas' Dialogical Model of Sociological Understanding. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 29 (2):371–384.
  17. Austin Harrington (1998). Habermas' Concept of the Lifeworld. Social Philosophy Today 13:39-53.
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