Search results for 'Australia' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eastern Australia (1965). EE Adder ley Radiophysics Laboratory, CSIRO, Sydney, Australia. In Karl W. Linsenmann (ed.), Proceedings. St. Louis, Lutheran Academy for Scholarship. 45--146.score: 180.0
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  2. Goran Svensson, Greg Wood, Jang Singh, Emily Carasco & Michael Callaghan (2009). Ethical Structures and Processes of Corporations Operating in Australia, Canada, and Sweden: A Longitudinal and Cross-Cultural Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):485 - 506.score: 24.0
    Based on the 'Partnership Model of Corporate Ethics' (Wood, 2002), this study examines the ethical structures and processes that are put in place by organizations to enhance the ethical business behavior of staff. The study examines the use of these structures and processes amongst the top companies in the three countries of Australia, Canada, and Sweden over two time periods (2001–2002 and 2005–2006). Subsequendy, a combined comparative and longitudinal approach is applied in the study, which we contend is a (...)
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  3. Glenn Albrecht, Clive R. McMahon, David M. J. S. Bowman & Corey J. A. Bradshaw (2009). Convergence of Culture, Ecology, and Ethics: Management of Feral Swamp Buffalo in Northern Australia. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):361-378.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the identity of Asian swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) from different value orientations. Buffalo were introduced into Northern (Top End) Australia in the early nineteenth century. A team of transdisciplinary researchers, including an ethicist, has been engaged in field research on feral buffalo in Arnhem Land over the past three years. Using historical documents, literature review, field observations, interviews with key informants, and interaction with the Indigenous land owners, an understanding of the diverse views on the scientific, (...)
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  4. G. Albrecht, C. R. McMahon, Dmjs Bowman & C. J. A. Bradshaw (2009). Convergence of Culture, Ecology, and Ethics: Management of Feral Swamp Buffalo in Northern Australia. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):361-378.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the identity of Asian swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) from different value orientations. Buffalo were introduced into Northern (Top End) Australia in the early nineteenth century. A team of transdisciplinary researchers, including an ethicist, has been engaged in field research on feral buffalo in Arnhem Land over the past three years. Using historical documents, literature review, field observations, interviews with key informants, and interaction with the Indigenous land owners, an understanding of the diverse views on the scientific, (...)
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  5. A. S. Franklin (2007). Human-Nonhuman Animal Relationships in Australia: An Overview of Results From the First National Survey and Follow-Up Case Studies 2000-2004. Society and Animals 15 (1):7-27.score: 24.0
    This paper provides an overview of results from an Australian Research Council-funded project "Sentiments and Risks: The Changing Nature of Human-Animal Relations in Australia." The data discussed come from a survey of 2000 representative Australians at the capital city, state, and rural regional level. It provides both a snapshot of the state of involvement of Australians with nonhuman animals and their views on critical issues: ethics, rights, animals as food, risk from animals, native versus introduced animals, hunting, fishing, and (...)
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  6. Allan Curtis & Terry De Lacy (1996). Landcare in Australia: Beyond the Expert Farmer. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 13 (1):20-31.score: 24.0
    The landcare program has been embraced by governments, farmer organizations and conservation groups throughout Australia as offering a model for effective community action to assist the move to more sustainable resource use. Over 2,500 landcare-type groups now operate across Australia with 65,000 members including almost 30% of the farming community. This research used surveys of landcare group activity in most Australian states, a study of the regional landcare action plan (RLAP) process in the state of Victoria, and a (...)
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  7. Jeremy Northcote & Abel D. Alonso (2011). Factors Underlying Farm Diversification: The Case of Western Australia's Olive Farmers. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 28 (2):237-246.score: 24.0
    The growth of niche markets in rural industries has been one response to the restructuring of established agricultural industries in developed countries. In some cases entry into niche markets is part of a diversification of activities from other areas of farm-based production or services. In other cases, operators have sought to diversify from niche market production into other areas, such as on-site selling and agritourism. This paper outlines the findings of an exploratory qualitative study of the factors that olive farmers (...)
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  8. Peter D. Rush (2011). Jurisdictions of Sexual Assault: Reforming the Texts and Testimony of Rape in Australia. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 19 (1):47-73.score: 24.0
    The reform of rape law remains a vexed enterprise. The wager of this article is that the plural traditions and technologies of criminal law can provide the resources for a radical rethinking of rape law. Parts 1 and 2 return to the historical and structural forms of rape law reform in Australia. These forms of reform illustrate a variety of criminal jurisdictions, and a transformation in the way in which rape law reform is conducted now. Against this transformation, Part (...)
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  9. Gabrielle N. Samuel & Ian H. Kerridge (2007). Equity, Utility, and the Marketplace: Emerging Ethical Issues of Umbilical Cord Blood Banking in Australia. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):57-63.score: 21.0
    Over the past decade, umbilical cord blood (UCB) has routinely been used as a source of haematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic stem cell transplants in the treatment of a range of malignant and non-malignant conditions affecting children and adults. UCB banks are a necessary part of the UCB transplant program, but their establishment has raised a number of important scientific, ethical and political issues. This paper examines the scientific and clinical evidence that has provided the basis for the establishment of (...)
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  10. Mario Fernando & Rafi M. M. I. Chowdhury (2010). The Relationship Between Spiritual Well-Being and Ethical Orientations in Decision Making: An Empirical Study with Business Executives in Australia. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):211 - 225.score: 21.0
    The relationship between spiritual wellbeing and ethical orientations in decision making is examined through a survey of executives in organizations listed on the Australian Stock Exchange. The four domains of spiritual well-being, personal, communal, environmental and transcendental (Fisher, Spiritual health: its nature and place in the school curriculum, PhD thesis, University of Melbourne, 1998; Gomez and Fisher, Pers Individ Differ 35:1975–1991, 2003) are examined in relation to idealism and relativism (Forsyth, J Pers Soc Psychol 39(1): 175–184, 1980). Results reveal that (...)
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  11. Tasmin Dilworth & Andrew McGregor (forthcoming). Moral Steaks? Ethical Discourses of In Vitro Meat in Academia and Australia. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-23.score: 21.0
    The profile and possibilities of in vitro meat are rapidly expanding, creating new ethical conundrums about how to approach this nascent biotechnology. The outcomes of these ethical debates will shape the future viability of this technology and its acceptability for potential consumers. In this paper we focus on how in vitro meat is being ethically constructed in academic literatures and contrast this with discourses evident in the mainstream print media. The academic literature is analysed to identify a typology of ethical (...)
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  12. Natalie Lloyd & Jane Mulcock (2007). Human-Animal Studies in Australia: Current Directions. Society and Animals 15 (1):1-5.score: 21.0
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  13. Jane Mulcock & Natalie Lloyd (2007). Human-Animal Studies in Australia: Current Directions. Society and Animals 15 (1):1-5.score: 21.0
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  14. Brooke Scelza & Rebecca Bliege Bird (2008). Group Structure and Female Cooperative Networks in Australia's Western Desert. Human Nature 19 (3):231-248.score: 21.0
    The division of labor has typically been portrayed as a complementary strategy in which men and women work on separate tasks to achieve a common goal of provisioning the family. In this paper, we propose that task specialization between female kin might also play an important role in women’s social and economic strategies. We use historic group composition data from a population of Western Desert Martu Aborigines to show how women maintained access to same-sex kin over the lifespan. Our results (...)
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  15. Megan C. Evans, James E. M. Watson, Richard A. Fuller, Oscar Venter, Simon C. Bennett, Peter R. Marsack & Hugh P. Possingham (2011). The Spatial Distribution of Threats to Species in Australia. BioScience 61 (4):281-289.score: 21.0
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  16. Stephen Chen & Petra Bouvain (2009). Is Corporate Responsibility Converging? A Comparison of Corporate Responsibility Reporting in the USA, UK, Australia, and Germany. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):299 - 317.score: 18.0
    Corporate social reporting, while not mandatory in most countries, has been adopted by many large companies around the world and there are now a variety of competing global standards for non-financial reporting, such as the Global Reporting Initiative and the UN Global Compact. However, while some companies (e. g., Henkel, BHP, Johnson and Johnson) have a long standing tradition in reporting non-financial information, other companies provide only limited information, or in some cases, no information at all. Previous studies have suggested (...)
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  17. Lawrence Apps (1990). Media Ethics in Australia. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (2):117 – 135.score: 18.0
    Codified ethics for journalists in Australia has a long history, almost as long as that in the United States. Unlike the United States, however, Australia has a unified code of ethics, that of the Australian Journalists' Association, which is generally accepted by the whole industry, both print and broadcast. But over the last 20 years, media consumers have shown they have a poor and declining view of the ethics of Australian journalists, despite the checks and balances that exist. (...)
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  18. Frank Jackson (2004). Corrupting the Youth: A History of Philosophy in Australia. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (4):652 – 653.score: 18.0
    Book Information Corrupting the Youth: A History of Philosophy in Australia. Corrupting the Youth: A History of Philosophy in Australia James Franklin , ( Sydney : Macleay Press , 2003 ), 465 , AU$59.95 By James Franklin. Macleay Press. Sydney. Pp. 465. AU$59.95.
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  19. John Kilcullen, Democracy in Australia.score: 18.0
    The Australian political system is in some ways democratic, and in some ways not. The relationship between Prime Minister, Parliament and electorate seems to me the most democratic part of the system. The undemocratic features include bicameralism, federalism, monarchy, and some others. In calling certain features undemocratic I don't necessarily mean they're bad. For the views of 19th century liberals on whether democracy is a good thing, and if so subject to what limitations (if any), and several similar questions, see (...)
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  20. Gerald Walther (2013). Ethics in Neuroscience Curricula: A Survey of Australia, Canada, Germany, the UK, and the US. Neuroethics 6 (2):343-351.score: 18.0
    This paper analyses ethical training in neuroscience curricula at universities in Australia, Canada, Germany, the United States and the United Kingdom. The main findings are that 52 % of all courses have ethical training available, while in 82 % of those cases, the training is mandatory. In terms of specific contents of the teaching, ethical issues about ‘animal subjects and human participation in research’, ‘scientific misconduct’, and ‘treatment of data’ were the most prominent. A special emphasis during the research (...)
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  21. Ian Phau & Garick Kea (2007). Attitudes of University Students Toward Business Ethics: A Cross-National Investigation of Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (1):61 - 75.score: 18.0
    With the current globalisation and complexity of today’s business environment, there are increasing concerns on the role of business ethics. Using culture and religion as the determinants, this paper presents a cross-national study of attitudes toward business ethics among three countries: Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong. The results of this paper have shown the attitudes toward business ethics to be significantly different among the three countries. It was also found that respondents who practised their religion tend to consider themselves (...)
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  22. David S. Waller (2012). “Truth in Advertising”: The Beginning of Advertising Ethics in Australia. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (1):46-56.score: 18.0
    In Australia, as in many countries, the early advertising industry had a poor reputation for honesty. However, in 1920 ?truth in advertising? and raising ethical behavior became the focus of the Second Convention of Advertising Men of Australasia, held in Sydney. This was a major event in Australia's advertising history and was seen as a way to legitimize the industry in the eyes of those who doubted advertising's honesty. This paper will look at the Sydney Advertising Convention, with (...)
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  23. Stewart Jones, Sandra van der Laan, Geoff Frost & Janice Loftus (2008). The Investment Performance of Socially Responsible Investment Funds in Australia. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):181 - 203.score: 18.0
    Interest in the notion of the possible financial sacrifice suffered by socially responsible investment (SRI) fund investors for considering ethical, social and environmental issues in their investment decisions has spawned considerable academic interest in the performance of SRI funds. Both the Australian and international research literature have yielded largely mixed results. However, several of these studies are hampered by methodological problems which can obscure the significance of reported results, such as the use of small sample sizes, inconsistencies in the time (...)
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  24. Donna D. Bobek, Robin W. Roberts & John T. Sweeney (2007). The Social Norms of Tax Compliance: Evidence From Australia, Singapore, and the United States. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):49 - 64.score: 18.0
    Tax compliance is a concern to governments around the world. Prior research (Alm, J. and I. Sanchez: 1995, KYKLOS 48, 3–19) has attributed unexplained inter-country differences in compliance rates to differences in social norms. Economics researchers studying tax compliance in the United States (U.S.) (see for example J. Andreoni et al.: 1998, Journal of Economic Literature 36, 818–860) have called for more attention to social (as opposed to economic) influences on tax compliance. In this study, we extend this prior research (...)
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  25. Peta Cook (2011). What Constitutes Adequate Public Consultation? Xenotransplantation Proceeds in Australia. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):67-70.score: 18.0
    The Australian moratorium on human clinical trials of xenotransplantation was lifted in December 2009. This decision follows public consultations on whether xenotransplantation should or should not proceed in Australia, which occurred in 2002 and 2004. However, the public consultation, in its design and process, did not facilitate meaningful public engagement and involvement, thus marginalising the public and devaluing their social experiences and diverse knowledges. This brief article questions what constitutes adequate public consultation, and suggests that consensus conferences or citizen (...)
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  26. Joanna Crossman & Hiroko Noma (2013). Sunao as Character: Its Implications for Trust and Intercultural Communication Within Subsidiaries of Japanese Multinationals in Australia. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):543-555.score: 18.0
    Drawing upon the findings of a grounded theory study, this article addresses how sunao-sa influences intercultural communication and the process of building and developing trust between Japanese expatriate managers and Australian supervisors working in subsidiaries of Japanese multinationals in Australia. The authors argue that sunao is related to other concepts in business ethics and virtue literature such as character and its constituents, empathy and concern for others. How sunao as a value, influences the process of interpreting intercultural behaviour in (...)
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  27. Kristen Lyons & James Whelan (2010). Community Engagement to Facilitate, Legitimize and Accelerate the Advancement of Nanotechnologies in Australia. NanoEthics 4 (1):53-66.score: 18.0
    There are increasing calls internationally for the development of regulation and policies related to the rapidly growing nanotechnologies sector. As part of the process of policy formation, it is widely accepted that deliberative community engagement processes should be included, enabling publics to have a say about nanotechnologies, expressing their hopes and fears, issues and concerns, and that these will be considered as part of the policy process. The Australian Federal and State governments have demonstrated a commitment to these ideals, undertaking (...)
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  28. Deborah Zion, Linda Briskman & Bebe Loff (2010). Returning to History: The Ethics of Researching Asylum Seeker Health in Australia. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):48-56.score: 18.0
    Australia's policy of mandatory indefinite detention of those seeking asylum and arriving without valid documents has led to terrible human rights abuses and cumulative deterioration in health for those incarcerated. We argue that there is an imperative to research and document the plight of those who have suffered at the hands of the Australian government and its agents. However, the normal tools available to those engaged in health research may further erode the rights and well being of this population, (...)
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  29. Göran Svensson, Greg Wood, Jang Singh & Michael Callaghan (2009). A Cross-Cultural Construct of the Ethos of the Corporate Codes of Ethics: Australia, Canada and Sweden. Business Ethics 18 (3):253-267.score: 18.0
    The objective of this paper is to develop and describe a construct of the ethos of the corporate codes of ethics (i.e. an ECCE construct) across three countries, namely Australia, Canada and Sweden. The introduced construct is rather unique as it is based on a cross-cultural sample seldom seen in the literature. While the outcome of statistical analyses indicated a satisfactory factor solution and acceptable estimates of reliability measures, some research limitations have been stressed. They provide a foundation for (...)
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  30. Betty B. Chaar & Johnson Lee (2012). Role of Socioeconomic Status on Consumers' Attitudes Towards DTCA of Prescription Medicines in Australia. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):447-460.score: 18.0
    The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, operating in Australia under the National Health Act 1953, provides citizens equal access to subsidised pharmaceuticals. With ever-increasing costs of medicines and global financial pressure on all commodities, the sustainability of the PBS is of crucial importance on many social and political fronts. Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription medicines is fast expanding, as pharmaceutical companies recognise and reinforce marketing potentials not only in healthcare professionals but also in consumers. DTCA is currently prohibited in Australia, (...)
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  31. Göran Svensson, Greg Wood, Jang Singh & Michael Callaghan (2009). Implementation, Communication and Benefits of Corporate Codes of Ethics: An International and Longitudinal Approach for Australia, Canada and Sweden. Business Ethics 18 (4):389-407.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the implementation, communication and benefits of corporate codes of ethics by the top companies operating in Australia, Canada and Sweden. It provides an international comparison across three continents. It is also based on a longitudinal approach where three national surveys were performed in 2001–2002 and replications of the same surveys were performed in 2005–2006. The empirical findings of this research show in all three countries that large organisations indicate a substantial interest in corporate codes of ethics. (...)
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  32. Greg Wood (2000). A Cross Cultural Comparison of the Contents of Codes of Ethics: USA, Canada and Australia. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 25 (4):287 - 298.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the contents of the codes of ethics of 83 of the top 500 companies operating in the private sector in Australia in an attempt to discover whether there are national characteristics that differentiate the codes used by companies operating in Australia from codes used by companies operating in the American and Canadian systems. The studies that were used as a comparison were Mathews (1987) for the United States of America and Lefebvre and Singh (1992) for (...)
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  33. Susan Dodds & Rachel A. Ankeny (2006). Regulation of hESC Research in Australia: Promises and Pitfalls for Deliberative Democratic Approaches. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):95-107.score: 18.0
    This paper considers the legislative debates in Australia that led to the passage of the Research Involving Human Embryos Act (Cth 2002) and the Prohibition of Human Cloning Act (Cth 2002). In the first part of the paper, we discuss the debate surrounding the legislation with particular emphasis on the ways in which demands for public consultation, public debate and the education of Australians about the potential ethical and scientific impact of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) research were deployed, (...)
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  34. D. Zion, L. Briskman & B. Loff (2009). Nursing in Asylum Seeker Detention in Australia: Care, Rights and Witnessing. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (9):546-551.score: 18.0
    Next SectionThe system of asylum seeker detention in Australia is one in which those seeking refuge are stripped of many of their rights, including the right to health. This presents serious ethical problems for healthcare providers working within this system. In this article we describe asylum seeker detention and analyse the role of nurses. We discuss how far an “ethics of care” and witnessing the suffering of asylum seekers can serve to improve their situation and improve ethical nursing practice.
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  35. Olivia Harvey (2011). Negotiating Meanings About Embryos in Australia From Potential Humans to Prohibited Substances. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (3):354-366.score: 18.0
    In Australia, the twin discoveries that resulted in Dolly the Sheep and the isolation of human embryonic stem cells in the 1990s prompted the then Minister for Health to request that the Australian Health Ethics Committee (AHEC) examine the issue of cloning and stem-cell science more closely. It is the AHEC’s job to report—in an ad hoc manner at the Minister’s request—on “any issues deemed to be pertinent to the Australian community.” Cloning and stem-cell science were big news worldwide, (...)
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  36. I. H. Kerridge & K. R. Mitchell (1996). The Legislation of Active Voluntary Euthanasia in Australia: Will the Slippery Slope Prove Fatal? Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (5):273-278.score: 18.0
    At 2.00 am on the morning of May 24, 1995 the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly Australia passed the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act by the narrow margin of 15 votes to 10. The act permits a terminally ill patient of sound mind and over the age of 18 years, and who is either in pain or suffering, or distress, to request a medical practitioner to assist the patient to terminate his or her life. Thus, Australia can lay (...)
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  37. Tamra Lysaght, John Little & Ian Kerridge (2011). Marginalizing Experience: A Critical Analysis of Public Discourse Surrounding Stem Cell Research in Australia (2005–6). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):191-202.score: 18.0
    Over the past decade, stem cell science has generated considerable public and political debate. These debates tend to focus on issues concerning the protection of nascent human life and the need to generate medical and therapeutic treatments for the sick and vulnerable. The framing of the public debate around these issues not only dichotomises and oversimplifies the issues at stake, but tends to marginalise certain types of voices, such as the women who donate their eggs and/or embryos to stem cell (...)
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  38. Göran Svensson, Greg Wood, Jang Singh, Janice M. Payan & Michael Callaghan (2011). The Embeddedness of Codes of Ethics in Organizations in Australia, Canada and the United States. Business Ethics 20 (4):405-417.score: 18.0
    The objective of this study is to test the embeddedness of codes of ethics (ECE) in organizations on aggregated data from three countries, namely Australia, Canada and the United States. The properties of four constructs of ECE are described and tested, including surveillance/training, internal communication, external communication and guidance. The data analysis shows that the model has satisfactory fit, validity and reliability. Furthermore, the results are fairly consistent when tested on each of the three samples (i.e. cross-national validation). This (...)
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  39. Rosslyn Ives (2012). Bigger or Better: Australia's Population Debate [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 107 (107):21.score: 18.0
    Ives, Rosslyn Review(s) of: Bigger or better: Australia's population debate, by Ian Lowe, University of Queensland Press, 2012, $34.95.
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  40. Neera Bhatia & James Tibballs (forthcoming). Deficiencies and Missed Opportunities to Formulate Clinical Guidelines in Australia for Withholding or Withdrawing Life-Sustaining Treatment in Severely Disabled and Impaired Infants. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the few, but important legal and coronial cases concerning withdrawing or withholding life-sustaining treatment from severely disabled or critically impaired infants in Australia. Although sparse in number, the judgements should influence common clinical practices based on assessment of “best interests” but these have not yet been adopted. In particular, although courts have discounted assessment of “quality of life” as a legitimate component of determination of “best interests,” this remains a prominent component of clinical guidelines. In addition, (...)
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  41. P. Boddington & U. Raisanen (2009). Theoretical and Practical Issues in the Definition of Health: Insights From Aboriginal Australia. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (1):49-67.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses attempts to define health within a public policy arena and practical and conceptual difficulties that arise. An Australian Aboriginal definition of health is examined. Although there are certain difficulties of translation, this definition is prominent in current Australian health policy and discourse about health. The definition can be seen as broadly holistic in comparison to other holistic definitions such as that of the World Health Organization. The nature of this holism and its grounding within the context of (...)
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  42. Stephen Hay (2009). Transforming Social and Educational Governance: Trade Training Centres and the Transition to Social Investment Politics in Australia. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (3):285 - 304.score: 18.0
    Prior to its election to office in 2007, the Australian Labor Party announced a commitment to introduce Trade Training Centres (TTCs) into all Australian secondary schools as an initiative of its Education Revolution. TTCs were proposed as a key element of Federal Labor's education and training policy that aimed to manage future risks to Australia's competitiveness in the emerging global economy and to support school-to-employment transitions for young people. This analysis adopts a governmentality framework to conceptualise the Federal Government's (...)
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  43. Teresa Moore & Kristy Richardson (2013). The Low Risk Research Ethics Application Process at CQUniversity Australia. Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (3):211-230.score: 18.0
    The CQUniversity Australia Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) is a human ethics research committee registered under the auspices of the National Health and Medical Research Council. In 2009 an external review of CQUniversity Australia’s HREC policies and procedures recommended that a low risk research process be available to the institution’s researchers. Subsequently, in 2010 the Human Research Ethics Committee Low Risk Application Procedure came into operation. This paper examines the applications made under the Human Research Ethics Committee Low (...)
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  44. Jeff Corntassel & Cindy Holder (2008). Who's Sorry Now? Government Apologies, Truth Commissions, and Indigenous Self-Determination in Australia, Canada, Guatemala, and Peru. Human Rights Review 9 (4):465-489.score: 18.0
    Official apologies and truth commissions are increasingly utilized as mechanisms to address human rights abuses. Both are intended to transform inter-group relations by marking an end point to a history of wrongdoing and providing the means for political and social relations to move beyond that history. However, state-dominated reconciliation mechanisms are inherently problematic for indigenous communities. In this paper, we examine the use of apologies, and truth and reconciliation commissions in four countries with significant indigenous populations: Canada, Australia, Peru, (...)
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  45. Henrika Kuklick (2011). Stuart Macintyre, The Poor Relation. A History of Social Sciences in Australia. Minerva 49 (3):355-358.score: 18.0
    Stuart Macintyre, The Poor Relation. A History of Social Sciences in Australia Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 355-358 DOI 10.1007/s11024-011-9173-3 Authors Henrika Kuklick, History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania, 303 Cohen Hall, 249 South 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6304, USA Journal Minerva Online ISSN 1573-1871 Print ISSN 0026-4695 Journal Volume Volume 49 Journal Issue Volume 49, Number 3.
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  46. Andrew Stranieri, John Zeleznikow, Mark Gawler & Bryn Lewis (1999). A Hybrid Rule – Neural Approach for the Automation of Legal Reasoning in the Discretionary Domain of Family Law in Australia. Artificial Intelligence and Law 7 (2-3):153-183.score: 18.0
    Few automated legal reasoning systems have been developed in domains of law in which a judicial decision maker has extensive discretion in the exercise of his or her powers. Discretionary domains challenge existing artificial intelligence paradigms because models of judicial reasoning are difficult, if not impossible to specify. We argue that judicial discretion adds to the characterisation of law as open textured in a way which has not been addressed by artificial intelligence and law researchers in depth. We demonstrate that (...)
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  47. Brian Butterworth & Robert Reeve (2008). Verbal Counting and Spatial Strategies in Numerical Tasks: Evidence From Indigenous Australia. Philosophical Psychology 21 (4):443 – 457.score: 18.0
    In this study, we test whether children whose culture lacks CWs and counting practices use a spatial strategy to support enumeration tasks. Children from two indigenous communities in Australia whose native and only language (Warlpiri or Anindilyakwa) lacked CWs and were tested on classical number development tasks, and the results were compared with those of children reared in an English-speaking environment. We found that Warlpiri- and Anindilyakwa-speaking children performed equivalently to their English-speaking counterparts. However, in tasks in which they (...)
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  48. S. M. Carter, C. Klinner, I. Kerridge, L. Rychetnik, V. Li & D. Fry (2012). The Ethical Commitments of Health Promotion Practitioners: An Empirical Study From New South Wales, Australia. Public Health Ethics 5 (2):128-139.score: 18.0
    In this article, we provide a description of the good in health promotion based on an empirical study of health promotion practices in New South Wales, the most populous state in Australia. We found that practitioners were unified by a vision of the good in health promotion that had substantive and procedural dimensions. Substantively, the good in health promotion was teleological: it inhered in meliorism, an intention to promote health, which was understood holistically and situated in places and environments, (...)
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  49. Clive Glenn Albrecht, David R. McMahon, Corey M. J. S. Bowman & J. A. Bradshaw (2009). Convergence of Culture, Ecology, and Ethics: Management of Feral Swamp Buffalo in Northern Australia. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4).score: 18.0
    This paper examines the identity of Asian swamp buffalo ( Bubalus bubalis ) from different value orientations. Buffalo were introduced into Northern (Top End) Australia in the early nineteenth century. A team of transdisciplinary researchers, including an ethicist, has been engaged in field research on feral buffalo in Arnhem Land over the past three years. Using historical documents, literature review, field observations, interviews with key informants, and interaction with the Indigenous land owners, an understanding of the diverse views on (...)
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  50. Howard Hodgens (2012). The Last Great Cause Volunteers From Australia and Emilia- Romanga in Defence of the Spanish Republic, 1936-1939 [Book Review]. [REVIEW] Australian Humanist, The (106):22.score: 18.0
    Hodgens, Howard Review(s) of: The last great cause volunteers from Australia and Emilia- Romanga in defence of the Spanish republic, 1936-1939, by V. G.Venturini, PB.Pub. Search Foundation 2010.
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