Search results for 'Austrian school of economics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Positive Economics & Milton Friedman (1979). 1. The Relation Between Positive and Normative Economics Confusion Between Positive and Normative Economics is to Some Extent Inevitable. The Subject Matter of Economics is Regarded by Almost Everyone From Essays in Positive Economics (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1953), Part I, Sections 1, 2, 3, and 6. [REVIEW] In Frank Hahn & Martin Hollis (eds.), Philosophy and Economic Theory. Oxford University Press 18.
     
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  2.  16
    Robert Mulligan (2006). Transactional Economics: John Dewey's Ways of Knowing and the Radical Subjectivism of the Austrian School. Education and Culture 22 (2):61-82.
    The subjectivism of the Austrian school of economics is a special case of Dewey's transactional philosophy, also known as pragmatism or pragmatic epistemology. The Austrian economists Carl Friedrich Menger (1840-1921) and Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973) adopted an Aristotelian deductive approach to economic issues such as social behavior and exchange. Like Menger and Mises, Friedrich A. Hayek (1899-1992) viewed scientific knowledge, even in the social sciences, as asserting and aiming for objective certainty. Hayek was particularly critical of (...)
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    Andy Denis (2008). Dialectics and the Austrian School? The Search for Common Ground in the Methodology of Heterodox Economics. Journal of Philosophical Economics 1 (2):151-173.
    In a recent paper (Denis, 2004b) I argued that the neoclassical use of the concept of equilibrium was guilty of a hypostatisation: an equilibrium which is only an abstraction and extrapolation, the logical terminus of a component process taken in isolation, is extracted and one-sidedly substituted for the whole. The temporary is made permanent, and process subordinated to stasis, with clearly apologetic results. I concluded by suggesting that this hypostatisation exemplified the contrast between formal and dialectical modes of thought, and (...)
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  4.  10
    David L. Prychitko (1993). Formalism in AustrianSchool Welfare Economics: Another Pretense of Knowledge? Critical Review 7 (4):567-592.
    Contemporary Austrian?school economists reject neoclassical welfare theory for being founded on the benchmark of a perfectly competitive general equilibrium, and instead favor a formal theory deemed consistent with the notions of radical subjectivism and disequilibrium analysis. Roy Cordato advances a bold free?market benchmark by which to formally assess social welfare, economic efficiency, and externalities issues. Like all formalist, a priori theory, however, Cordato's reformulation cannot meet its own standards, being theoretically and empirically flawed, and perhaps ideologically suspect.
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  5.  86
    Gustavo Cevolani (2011). Hayek in the Lab. Austrian School, Game Theory, and Experimental Economics. Logic and Philosophy of Science 9 (1):429-436.
    Focusing on the work of Friedrich von Hayek and Vernon Smith, we discuss some conceptual links between Austrian economics and recent work in behavioral game theory and experimental economics. After a brief survey of the main methodological aspects of Austrian and experimental economics, we suggest that common views on subjectivism, individualism, and the role of qualitative explanations and predictions in social science may favour a fruitful interaction between these two research programs.
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  6.  23
    Raimondo Cubeddu (1993). The Philosophy of the Austrian School. Routledge.
    In recent years, the Austrian School has been an influential contributor to the social sciences. Yet most of the attempts to understand this vital school of thought have remained locked into a polemical frame. The Philosophy of the Austrian School challenges this approach through a philosophically grounded account of the School's methodological, political, and economic ideas. Raimondo Cubeddu acknowledges important differences between the key figures in the School--Menger, Mises and Hayek-- but also finds (...)
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  7. Erich Streissler (1988). The Intellectual and Political Impact of the Austrian School of Economics. History of European Ideas 9 (2):191-204.
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  8.  2
    Ludwig von Mises, The Historical Setting of the Austrian School of Economics.
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  9. Steven Horwitz (2004). From Revival to Flourishing: Thirty Years of the Austrian School A Review of Sandye Gloria-Palermo's Modern Austrian Economics: Archaeology of a Revival. Journal of Economic Methodology 11:249-256.
     
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  10.  9
    Wolfgang Grassl & Barry Smith (eds.) (2010). Austrian Economics: Historical and Philosophical Background. Croom Helm / Routledge.
    First published in 1986 and reprinted in 2010 in the Routledge Revivals series, this book presents the first detailed confrontation between the Austrian school of economics and Austrian philosophy, especially the philosophy of the Brentano school. It contains a study of the roots of Austrian economics in the liberal political theory of the nineteenth-century Hapsburg empire, and a study of the relations between the general theory of value underlying Austrian economics and (...)
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  11. Peter J. Boettke & Christopher J. Coyne (eds.) (2015). The Oxford Handbook of Austrian Economics. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The Austrian School of Economics is an intellectual tradition in economics and political economy dating back to Carl Menger in the late-19th century. Menger stressed the subjective nature of value in the individual decision calculus. Individual choices are indeed made on the margin, but the evaluations of rank ordering of ends sought in the act of choice are subjective to individual chooser. For Menger, the economic calculus was about scarce means being deployed to pursue an individual's (...)
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  12. Hardy Bouillon (2010). Business Ethics and the Austrian Tradition in Economics. Routledge.
    Introduction -- Ethical preliminaries -- Economics -- Justice -- Business ethics -- Conclusion.
     
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  13.  20
    Barry Smith (1994). The Philosophy of Austrian Economics. [REVIEW] Review of Austrian Economics 7:127–132.
    Review of David Gordon, The Philosophical Origins of Austrian Economics.
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  14.  15
    León Gómez Rivas (1999). Business Ethics and the History of Economics in Spain "the School of Salamanca: A Bibliography". [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 22 (3):191 - 202.
    The name "School of Salamanca" refers to a group of theologians and natural law philosophers who taught in the University of Salamanca, following the inspiration of the great Thomist Francisco de Vitoria. It turns out that the Scholastics were not simply medieval, but began in the 13th century and expanded through the 16th and 17th centuries; and they developed some original theories about economics and international law.Why should a few men mainly interested in theology and ethics apply themselves (...)
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  15.  95
    Chris Renwick (2014). Completing the Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at London School of Economics During the 1930s. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):478-496.
    Much has been written about the relationship between biology and social science during the early twentieth century. However, discussion is often drawn toward a particular conception of eugenics, which tends to obscure our understanding of not only the wide range of intersections between biology and social science during the period but also their impact on subsequent developments. This paper draws attention to one of those intersections: the British economist and social reformer William Beveridge’s controversial efforts to establish a Department of (...)
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  16. Stephen T. Casper (2014). Chickens and Eggs A Commentary on Chris Renwick's “Completing the Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at London School of Economics During the 1930s”. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):506-514.
    Why would anyone want there to be natural foundations for the social sciences? In a provocative essay exploring precisely that question, historian Chris Renwick uses an interwar debate featuring William Beveridge, Lancelot Hogben, and Friedrich Hayek to begin to imagine what might have been had such a program calling for biological knowledge to form the natural bases of the social sciences been realized at the London School of Economics. Yet perhaps Renwick grants too much attention to differences and (...)
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  17.  9
    Ana Maria Bianchi & Cleofas Salviano (1999). Raúl Prebisch and the Beginnings of the Latin American School of Economics: A Rhetorical Perspective. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (3):423-438.
    Fifty years ago, the Argentinean economist Raúl Prebisch published a paper called Estúdio Económico de América Latina. The Estúdio was one of the first texts that set up what was later termed the ?Prebisch-Singer thesis? or, more widely, the Latin American School of Economics. According to this document, Latin American countries should undergo an industrialization program under the direct supervision of the national state. The rationale for this thesis was the deterioration of the terms of trade for countries (...)
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  18.  8
    Marcin Dąbrowski (2006). E-Learning Initiatives in an Academic Environment—Case Study of Warsaw School of Economics (WSE). Dialogue and Universalism 16 (3/4):73-80.
    The aim of the paper is to describe possible e-learning activities that a university can develop. Examples of projects carried out in Warsaw School of Economics have been presented with conclusions and experience gathered during their implementation. In the last part, trends for the future of academic e-learning have been discussed.
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  19. Govind C. Persad, Linden Elder, Laura Sedig, Leonardo Flores & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (2008). The Current State of Medical School Education in Bioethics, Health Law, and Health Economics. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):89-94.
    This study reviews the amount of attention bioethics, health law, and health economics receive in medical school curricula and the background of professors teaching these topic. It concludes that the number of required hours of instruction in bioethics, health law, and health economics in medical schools comprises less than two percent of the medical school curriculum; that time on these subjects is heavily weighted toward the first two years of medical education; and that many instructors have (...)
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  20.  17
    Thomas Mayer (1998). Boettke's Austrian Critique of Mainstream Economics: An Empiricist's Response. Critical Review 12 (1-2):151-171.
    Abstract Many of Boettke's criticisms of formalist economics are justified. However, he defines formalism so broadly that it becomes practically synonymous with mainstream economics, while his criticisms primarily target the sins of formalist economics more narrowly defined. And since he treats Austrian economics as the only viable alternative to mainstream economics, he incorrectly awards victory to Austrian economics. While Austrian economics has some valuable ideas to contribute to mainstream economics, (...)
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  21.  22
    Ricardo F. Crespo, Reappraising Austrian Economics' Basic Tenets in the Light of Aristotelian Ideas.
    This paper sustains that reappraising Austrian economics in the light of Aristotelian ideas is not only possible but also fruitful. First, the paper draws a sketch of the essential features of Austrian economics. Next, it argues about the necessity for a thorough analysis of the notion of freedom, and it analyzes Mises's conception. Next, the paper exposes Aristotle's social, epistemological and economic thought related to Austrian main traits. An account of how the exercise of Aristotelian (...)
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  22. Roderick Long (2005). Wittgenstein, Austrian Economics, and the Logic of Action: Praxeological Investigations. Routledge.
    Fascinating and thought-provoking, this book shows how the methodology of Austrian economics can be justified and strengthened by grounding it in the philosophy of Wittgenstein. Frege and Wittgenstein argued that whatever counts as thought must embody logical principles. Their arguments also support the conclusion that whatever constitutes action must embody economic principles. In this incisive text, the author shows that this confirms the claims of Austrian economists such as Mises and Hayek that the laws of economics (...)
     
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  23. Roderick Long (2050). Wittgenstein, Austrian Economics, and the Logic of Action: Praxeological Investigations. Routledge.
    Fascinating and thought-provoking, this book shows how the methodology of Austrian economics can be justified and strengthened by grounding it in the philosophy of Wittgenstein. Frege and Wittgenstein argued that whatever counts as thought must embody logical principles. Their arguments also support the conclusion that whatever constitutes action must embody economic principles. In this incisive text, the author shows that this confirms the claims of Austrian economists such as Mises and Hayek that the laws of economics (...)
     
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  24.  44
    Barry Smith (1990). On the Austrianness of Austrian Economics. Critical Review 4 (1-2):212-238.
    Much recent work on the intellectual background of Austrian economics reveals an unfortunate lack of awareness of the distinct nature of the Austrian contribution to philosophy, from which the Austrian economists drew many of their ideas. The present essay offers a sketch of this contribution, contrasting Austrian philosophy especially with the modes of philosophy dominant in Germany. This makes it possible to throw new light on the relations on Mises, Kant and the Vienna circle, and (...)
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  25.  51
    Edward Younkins (2010). Human Nature, Flourishing, and Happiness: Toward a Synthesis of Aristotelianism, Austrian Economics, Positive Psychology, and Ayn Rand's Objectivism. Libertarian Papers 2.
    This article presents a skeleton of a potential paradigm of human flourishing and happiness in a free society. It is an exploratory attempt to construct an understanding from various disciplines and to integrate them into a clear, consistent, coherent, and systematic whole. Holding that there are essential interconnections among objective ideas, the article specifically emphasizes the compatibility of Aristotelianism, Austrian Economics, Positive Psychology, and Ayn Rand’s Objectivism arguing that particular ideas from these areas can be integrated into a (...)
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  26. Edward W. Younkins (2011). Flourishing & Happiness in a Free Society: Toward a Synthesis of Aristotelianism, Austrian Economics, and Ayn Rand's Objectivism. Upa.
    This book emphasizes the compatibility of Aristotelianism, Austrian economics, and Ayn Rand's Objectivism, arguing that particular ideas from these areas can be integrated as a potential paradigm of human flourishing and happiness in a free society. It constructs an understanding from various disciplines into a clear, consistent, and systematic whole.
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  27.  4
    Kathleen Touchstone (2016). Charity, Childcare, and Crime: From Objectivist Ethics to the Austrian School. Libertarian Papers 8 (1):23-57.
    : The purpose of this paper is to address from a normative perspective issues raised by John Mueller in Redeeming Economics: Rediscovering the Missing Element. Mueller criticizes economists, including Austrians, for failing to properly address unilateral transfers—in particular, charity, childcare, and crime—in economic thought. Mueller challenges economist Gary Becker’s position that giving increases the […] The post “Charity, Childcare, and Crime: From Objectivist Ethics to the Austrian School” appeared first on Libertarian Papers.
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  28.  4
    Kathleen Touchstone, Charity, Childcare, and Crime: From Objectivist Ethics to the Austrian School.
    : The purpose of this paper is to address from a normative perspective issues raised by John Mueller in Redeeming Economics: Rediscovering the Missing Element. Mueller criticizes economists, including Austrians, for failing to properly address unilateral transfers—in particular, charity, childcare, and crime—in economic thought. Mueller challenges economist Gary Becker’s position that giving increases the […] The post “Charity, Childcare, and Crime: From Objectivist Ethics to the Austrian School” appeared first on Libertarian Papers.
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  29. Richard Rawlings (ed.) (1997). Law, Society, and Economy: Centenary Essays for the London School: Centenary Essays for the London School of Economics and Political Science, 1895-1995. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This centenary volume of essays explores a number of related themes which differentiate and characterize the approach of the LSE. Central to this, is the assumption that law is one of the social sciences and that law should be studied "in context" as a social phenomenon. The contributors have been chosen both for their distinction and for their connection with the LSE, and include such eminent figures as Mrs Justice Arden, Judge Rosalyn Higgins, Sir Stephen Sedley, and Roberto Mangabeira Unger. (...)
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  30.  26
    Paul Davidson (1989). The Economics of Ignorance or Ignorance of Economics? Critical Review 3 (3-4):467-487.
    THE ECONOMICS OF TIME AND IGNORANCE by Gerald P. O'Driscoll, Jr. and Mario J. Rizzo New York: Basil Blackwell, 1985. 261pp., $34.95 O'Driscoll and Rizzo, two leading exponents of the Austrian subjectivist school of economics, claim to provide an original and powerful challenge to mainstream neoclassical economics. They also argue that there is much common ground between the Austrian approach and the recent development of Post Keynesian analysis. In this essay, the validity of such (...)
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  31.  35
    Govind C. Persad, Linden Elder, Laura Sedig, Leonardo Flores & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (2008). The Current State of Medical School Education in Bioethics, Health Law, and Health Economics. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (1):89-94.
    Current challenges in medical practice, research, and administration demand physicians who are familiar with bioethics, health law, and health economics. Curriculum directors at American Association of Medical Colleges-affiliated medical schools were sent confidential surveys requesting the number of required hours of the above subjects and the years in which they were taught, as well as instructor names. The number of relevant publications since 1990 for each named instructor was assessed by a PubMed search.In sum, teaching in all three subjects (...)
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  32. Neven Sesardic, Ioannis Votsis, London School of Economics.
    Does the concept of “race” find support in contemporary science, particularly in biology? No, says Naomi Zack, together with so many others who nowadays argue that human races lack biological reality. This claim is widely accepted in a number of fields (philosophy, biology, anthropology, and psychology), and Zack’s book represents only the latest defense of social constructivism in this context. There are several reasons why she fails to make a convincing case. Zack starts by arbitrarily ascribing an anachronistically essentialist connotation (...)
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  33.  8
    Carl Cranor, Helena Eilstein & Adam Grobler (1997). Timothy Childers Undertook His Graduate Studies at the London School, of Economics, and is Employed as a Researcher in the Department of Logic, Institute of Philosophy, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. His Main Interests Center on the Foundations of Probability, with Applications to Methodology and Epistemology. Foundations of Science 2:397-399.
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  34.  1
    Alister Browne, Gideon Calder, Felicia Cohn & Marion Danis (2006). Barbro Björkman is a Ph. D Student at the Philosophy Unit of the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. Her Previous Academic Degrees Include an M. Sc. From London School of Economics and a BA From King's College London. Her Primary Research Interests Are Ethics, Bioethics, and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15:1-3.
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  35.  82
    Roderick T. Long, Wittgenstein, Austrian Economics, and the Logic of Action.
    Ludwig von Mises,2 who originated the view, and his students Friedrich Hayek and Murray Rothbard, who developed and extended it. On their view, the laws of economics are conceptual truths, and economic truth is grounded in an a priori science they call praxeology,3 or the “logic of action.”4 Essentially, praxeology is the study of those propositions concerning human action that can be grasped and recognized as true simply in virtue of an inspection of their constituent concepts.
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  36. J. Mark (1996). Dwayne A. Banks, Ph. D., is Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley and Currently an Atlantic Fellow in Public Policy at the London School of Economics and the King's Fund Policy Insti-Tute, London. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5:482-483.
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  37. Dimitris Milonakis & Ben Fine (2008). From Political Economy to Economics: Method, the Social and the Historical in the Evolution of Economic Theory. Routledge.
    Economics has become a monolithic science, variously described as formalistic and autistic with neoclassical orthodoxy reigning supreme. So argue Dimitris Milonakis and Ben Fine in this new major work of critical recollection. The authors show how economics was once rich, diverse, multidimensional and pluralistic, and unravel the processes that lead to orthodoxy’s current predicament. The book details how political economy became economics through the desocialisation and the dehistoricisation of the dismal science, accompanied by the separation of (...) from the other social sciences, especially economic history and sociology. It is argued that recent attempts from within economics to address the social and the historical have failed to acknowledge long standing debates amongst economists, historians and other social scientists. This has resulted in an impoverished historical and social content within mainstream economics. The book ranges over the shifting role of the historical and the social in economic theory, the shifting boundaries between the economic and the non-economic, all within a methodological context. Schools of thought and individuals, that have been neglected or marginalised, are treated in full, including classical political economy and Marx, the German and British historical schools, American institutionalism, Weber and Schumpeter and their programme of Socialökonomik, and the Austrian school. At the same time, developments within the mainstream tradition from marginalism through Marshall and Keynes to general equilibrium theory are also scrutinised, and the clashes between the various camps from the famous Methodenstreit to the fierce debates of the 1930s and beyond brought to the fore. The prime rationale underpinning this account drawn from the past is to put the case for political economy back on the agenda. This is done by treating economics as a social science once again, rather than as a positive science, as has been the inclination since the time of Jevons and Walras. It involves transcending the boundaries of the social sciences, but in a particular way that is in exactly the opposite direction now being taken by "economics imperialism". Drawing on the rich traditions of the past, the reintroduction and full incorporation of the social and the historical into the main corpus of political economy will be possible in the future. (shrink)
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  38. Maurice Lagueux, Von Mises' Apriorism and Austrian Economics: From Menger to Mises.
    There is no doubt that Carl Menger and Ludwig von Mises can be considered as two of the most representative and influential members of the Austrian school of economics. However, given the fact that this school is well known for being a methodological school, it might be surprizing to note how far these two prominent economists apparently stand on methodological questions. While Menger frequently insisted that "no essential differences between the ethical and the natural sciences (...)
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  39.  3
    Thomas Uebel (2007). Otto Neurath as an Austrian Economist: Behind the Scenes of the Early Socialist Calculation Debate. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 13:37-59.
    Otto Neurath is well known as a founding member of the Vienna Circle, one of several points of origin of logical empiricism or neopositivism. While Neurath’s distinctive contribution to the philosophy of science and epistemology in general has come to be recognised after long neglect, his economic thought remains relatively unexplored. A striking fact has thus remained long obscured: Neurath is not the “positivist” economist one might expect. To throw this point into further relief, the question I want to explore (...)
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  40.  17
    J. Barkley Rosser, Emergence and Complexity in Austrian Economics.
    A deep theme of Austrian economics has been that of spontaneous order or selforganization of the economy. The origin of this theme dates to the putative founder of the Austrian School, Carl Menger, with his theory of the spontaneous emergence of money for transactions purposes in primitive economies being archetypal example (Menger, 1892). Menger drew this approach from the Scottish Enlightenment figures David Hume, Adam Ferguson, and Adam Smith, with the latter’s Wealth of Nations (1776) particularly (...)
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  41. H. B. Acton (1974). The Idea of a Spiritual Power: Auguste Comte Memorial Trust Lecture, Delivered on 15 May 1973 at the London School of Economics and Political Science. [REVIEW] Athlone Press.
  42. Barry Smith (2010). Austrian Economics and Austrian Philosophy. In Wolfgang Grassl & Barry Smith (eds.), Austrian Economics and Austrian Philosophy.
    Austrian economics starts out from the thesis that the objects of economic science differ from those of the natural sciences because of the centrality of the economic agent. This allows a certain a priori or essentialistic aspect to economic science of a sort which parallels the a priori dimension of psychology defended by Brentano and his student Edmund Husserl. We outline these parallels, and show how the theory of a priori dependence relations outlined in Husserl’s Logical Investigations can (...)
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  43.  3
    Philip Kitcher & Michael Redhead (1989). It Jl the London School of Economics and Political Science. Synthese 81 (135).
  44.  11
    D. A. Rees (1955). Myth and Reason. By W. K. C. Guthrie. Oration at the London School of Economics and Political Science on Friday, 12 December, 1952. (The London School of Economics and Political Science, 1953. Pp. 20. Price 2s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 30 (112):76-.
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  45. Peter Clark (1976). London School of Economics and Political Science. In Colin Howson (ed.), Method and Appraisal in the Physical Sciences: The Critical Background to Modern Science, 1800-1905. Cambridge University Press 41.
  46.  3
    O. de Selincourt (1949). Reason and Unreason in Society. By Morris Ginsberg, M.A., D.Lit., Martin White Professor of Sociology in the University of London. (London, New York and Toronto: Longmans, Green & Co., 1947. Pp. Vii, 327. Price 15s. Net. Publications of the London School of Economics, New General Series, No. 1.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 24 (89):159-.
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  47. Herbert Butterfield (1956). History as the Emancipation From the Past Oration Delivered at the London School of Economics and Political Science on Friday, 9 December 1955. London School of Economics and Political Science.
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  48. Diana Coole (2000). Conference Report: Political Studies Association Annual Conference, London School of Economics, 10–13 April 2000. Radical Philosophy 102.
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  49. Ricardo Crespo (1994). General equilibrium or market process. Neoclassical and austrian theories of economics. [REVIEW] Philosophica 17:307.
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  50. Marcin Dąbrowski (2006). E-Learning Initiatives in an Academic Environment—Case Study of Warsaw School of Economics. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (3):73-80.
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