Search results for 'Autobiography' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ontology Autobiography (2009). Chapter Two Autobiography, Ontology and Responsibility Roy Elveton. In B. P. O'Donohoe & R. O. Elveton (eds.), Sartre's Second Century. Cambridge Scholars 17.
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  2.  71
    Christine James (2013). The Economic and Family Context of Philosophical Autobiography: Acting ‘As-If’ for American Buddenbrooks. Journal of Philosophy of Life 3 (1):24-42.
    This paper addresses the project of philosophical autobiography, using two different perspectives. On the one hand, the societal, economic, and family contexts of William James are addressed, and connected a modern academic context of business ethics research, marketing and purchasing decision making, and the continuing financial crisis. The concepts of “stream of consciousness” and “acting as-if” are connected to recent literature on William James. On the other hand, the significance of family context, and the possible connection between the William (...)
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  3. Samuel Clark (2011). Love, Poetry, and the Good Life: Mill's Autobiography and Perfectionist Ethics. Inquiry 53 (6):565-578.
    I argue for a perfectionist reading of Mill’s account of the good life, by using the failures of development recorded in his Autobiography as a way to understand his official account of happiness in Utilitarianism. This work offers both a new perspective on Mill’s thought, and a distinctive account of the role of aesthetic and emotional capacities in the most choiceworthy human life. I consider the philosophical purposes of autobiography, Mill’s disagreements with Bentham, and the nature of competent (...)
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  4.  15
    Robert Smith (1995). Derrida and Autobiography. Cambridge University Press.
    The work of Jacques Derrida can be seen to reinvent most theories. In this book Robert Smith offers both a reading of the philosophy of Derrida and an investigation of current theories of autobiography. Smith argues that for Derrida autobiography is not so much subjective self-revelation as relation to the other, not so much a general condition of thought as a general condition of writing - what Derrida calls the 'autobiography of the writing' - which mocks any (...)
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  5.  30
    John Kadvany (1996). Reason in History: Paul Feyerabend's Autobiography. Inquiry 39 (1):141 – 146.
    This review was prompted by the publication of Paul Feyerabend's autobiography Killing Time, just following his sudden death in 1994.
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  6.  23
    Ole Martin Skilleås (2006). Knowledge and Imagination in Fiction and Autobiography. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):259–276.
    Autobiographies are particularly interesting in the context of moral philosophy because they offer us rare and extended examples of how other people think, feel and reflect, which is of crucial importance in the development of phronesis (practical wisdom). In this article, Martha Nussbaum's use of fictional literature is shown to be of limited interest, and her arguments in Poetic Justice against the use of personal narratives in moral philosophy are shown to be unfounded. An analysis of Aristotle's concept (...)
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  7.  2
    Viktor Johansson (2015). Questions From the Rough Ground: Teaching, Autobiography and the Cosmopolitan “I”. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (5):441-458.
    In this article I explore how cosmopolitanism can be a challenge for ordinary language philosophy. I also explore cosmopolitan aspects of Stanley Cavell’s ordinary language philosophy. Beginning by considering the moral aspects of cosmopolitanism and some examples of discussions of cosmopolitanism in philosophy of education, I turn to the scene of instruction in Wittgenstein and to Stanley Cavell’s emphasis on the role of autobiography in philosophy. The turn to the autobiographical dimension of ordinary language philosophy, especially its use of (...)
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  8.  6
    Thomas Mathien & D. G. Wright (eds.) (2006). Autobiography as Philosophy: The Philosophical Uses of Self-Presentation. Routledge.
    Since Plato a surprisingly large number of philosophers have chosen to write in the first person about their own lives either in works that were primarily autobiographical or in the context of other more conventionally written texts. These texts stand in marked contrast to the bulk of philosophical writing, particularly in the past century during which the discipline has become ever more professionalized and specialized. Instead of the common impersonal and argumentative forms of ordinary philosophic discussion, these autobiographical texts are (...)
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  9.  32
    Shlomit C. Schuster (2003). The Philosopher's Autobiography: A Qualitative Study. Praeger.
    Examines philosophical autobiography as a literary genre and an alternative to Freudian psychoanalysis.
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  10. Donald Phillip Verene (1991). The New Art of Autobiography: An Essay on the Life of Giambattista Vico, Written by Himself. Oxford University Press.
    In this, the first full-length study of Vico's highly original autobiography, Verene discusses its place in the history of autobiography generally, and shows it to be the first work of modern intellectual autobiography which uses a genetic method. The author views the autobiography as a work in which Vico applies the principles of human history discussed in New Science, making the telling of his own life an application and verification of his own philosophy. He places Vico's (...)
     
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  11. N. Maxwell (2012). Arguing for Wisdom in the University: An Intellectual Autobiography. Philosophia 40 (4):663-704.
    For forty years I have argued that we urgently need to bring about a revolution in academia so that the basic task becomes to seek and promote wisdom. How did I come to argue for such a preposterously gigantic intellectual revolution? It goes back to my childhood. From an early age, I desired passionately to understand the physical universe. Then, around adolescence, my passion became to understand the heart and soul of people via the novel. But I never discovered how (...)
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  12. Jenann Ismael (2006). Saving the Baby: Dennett on Autobiography, Agency, and the Self. Philosophical Psychology 19 (3):345-360.
    Dennett argues that the decentralized view of human cognitive organization finding increasing support in parts of cognitive science undermines talk of an inner self. On his view, the causal underpinnings of behavior are distributed across a collection of autonomous subsystems operating without any centralized supervision. Selves are fictions contrived to simplify description and facilitate prediction of behavior with no real correlate inside the mind. Dennett often uses an analogy with termite colonies whose behavior looks organized and purposeful to the external (...)
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  13.  88
    Francesco Tampoia (2010). Autobiography-Heterobiography, Philosophy and Religion in Derrida. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 14 (1):119-142.
    In this paper, I would like to show how the movements of never stable meanings that link biography and religion are figured and interwoven throughout a kind of ineffable literary and philosophical notion of religion. Religion is a notion that can be understood through a cluster of topics such as origin, promise, dissociation, the unconditional, forgiveness, the undeconstructable and the possibility of the impossible—terms and expressions that Derrida suggests describe God.
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  14.  45
    John D. Barbour (2004). The Value of Solitude: The Ethics and Spirituality of Aloneness in Autobiography. University of Virginia Press.
    Christian solitude -- Bounded solitude in Augustine's Confessions -- The humanist tradition : Petrarch, Montaigne, and Gibbon -- Rousseau's myth of solitude in reveries of the solitary walker -- Thoreau at Walden : soliloquizing and talking to all the universe at the same time -- Twentieth-century varieties of solitary experience -- Thomas Merton and solitude : the door to solitude opens only from the inside -- Solitude, writing, and fathers in Paul Auster's The invention of solitude -- Conclusion: The value (...)
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  15.  14
    T. Stephen Champlin (1979). Self-Deception: A Problem About Autobiography. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 77:77-94.
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  16.  7
    Anthony J. Palmer (1979). Self-Deception: A Problem About Autobiography. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 61:61-76.
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  17.  1
    Herbert Hrachovec (forthcoming). At the Crossroads of the Wittgenstein and Autobiography Highways – N. Immler: Das Familiengedächtnis der Wittgensteins (2011). Nordic Wittgenstein Review.
    Review of N. Immler: Das Familiengedächtnis der Wittgensteins (2011).
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  18. Kathleen M. Ashley, Leigh Gilmore & Gerald Peters (1994). Autobiography & Postmodernism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  19.  7
    Patrick Riley (2004). Character and Conversion in Autobiography: Augustine, Montaigne, Descartes, Rousseau, and Sartre. University of Virginia Press.
    Moving from a purely religious rebirth to works grounded in a personal philosophy or aesthetic vocation, the autobiographies considered in this book stand as episodes in a genealogy of conversion.
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  20. Linda Haverty Rugg (1997). Picturing Ourselves: Photography and Autobiography. University of Chicago Press.
     
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  21. Bertrand Russell (1998). The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell. Routledge.
    Bertrand Russell was born in 1872 and died in 1970. One of the most influential figures of the twentieth century, he transformed philosophy and can lay claim to being one of the greatest philosophers of all time. He was a Nobel Prize winner for Literature and was imprisoned several times as a result of his pacifism. His views on religion, education, sex, politics and many other topics, made him one of the most read and revered writers of the age. This, (...)
     
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  22.  2
    R. G. Collingwood (1939). An Autobiography. New York, Etc.]Oxford University Press.
  23.  38
    Naoko Saito (2009). Ourselves in Translation: Stanley Cavell and Philosophy as Autobiography. Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (2):253-267.
    This paper offers a different approach to writing about oneself—Stanley Cavell's idea of philosophy as autobiography. In Cavell's understanding, the acknowledgement of the partiality of the self is an essential condition for achieving the universal. In the apparently paradoxical combination of the 'philosophical' and the 'autobiographical', Cavell shows us a way of focusing on the self and yet always transcending the self. The task requires, however, a reconstruction of the notions of philosophy and autobiography, and at the same (...)
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  24. Ursula Tidd (1999). The Self-Other Relation in Beauvoir’s Ethics and Autobiography. Hypatia 14 (4):163-174.
    : This article examines how some of Simone de Beauvoir's ethical notions about the Self-Other relation explored in her theoretical philosophy of the 1940s were developed in her subsequent autobiography. It argues that Beauvoir represents reciprocal alter-ity in these autobiographical texts through a testimonial engagement with autobiography conceptualized as an act of bearing witness for the Other, through the privileging of various interlocutors and privileged others with whom "the real" is experienced and through a negotiation with the reader. (...)
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  25.  86
    John Gibson (2012). Selves on Selves: The Philosophical Significance of Autobiography. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (4):109-119.
    Philosophers of literature do not take much of an interest in autobiography.1 In one sense this is not surprising. As a certain prejudice has it, autobiography is, along with biography, the preferred reading of people who do not really like to read. The very words can conjure up images of what one finds on bookshelves in Florida retirement communities and in underfunded public libraries, books with titles like Under the Rainbow: The Real Liza Minnelli or Me: Stories of (...)
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  26.  1
    R. G. Collingwood (1970). An Autobiography. Oxford University Press.
  27. Bertrand Russell (2009). Autobiography. Routledge.
    Bertrand Russell remains one of the greatest philosophers and most complex and controversial figures of the twentieth century. Here, in this frank, humorous and decidedly charming autobiography, Russell offers readers the story of his life – introducing the people, events and influences that shaped the man he was to become. Originally published in three volumes in the late 1960s, _Autobiography_ by Bertrand Russell is a revealing recollection of a truly extraordinary life written with the vivid freshness and clarity that (...)
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  28.  17
    Hugh Sockett (2009). Self-Portraiture: The Uses of Academic Autobiography. Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):167-174.
    This review article examines Leonard Waks's innovative collection of essays entitled Self-Portraiture: The Uses of Academic Autobiography: Review of Leaders in Philosophy of Education: Intellectual Self-Portraits. The book is based on invitations to leading philosophers of education to write about their own careers in the field and to offer an intellectual autobiography. The purpose of the book is not primarily to provide a history of particular arguments and their rebuttal, and in this sense it is not directly philosophical, (...)
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  29.  4
    James Connelly & Hans-Georg Gadamer (2007). An Autobiography in Germany and Romania. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 13 (1):5-26.
    R.G.Collingwood's Autobiography is the next of Collingwood's books to be revised for a new edition by Oxford University Press.It will include new manuscript material, include his Log of a Journey to the East Indies In addition there will be a number of scholarly essays relating Collingwood's ideas to his life and broader concerns.It is opportune to make available in English two introductions to the German and Romanian editions of An Autobiography.
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  30.  29
    Julian Baggini (2002). Philosophical Autobiography. Inquiry 45 (3):295 – 312.
    An examination of the genre of philosophical autobiography sheds light on the role of personal judgment alongside objective rationality in philosophy. Building on Monk's conception of philosophical biography, philosophical autobiography can be seen as any autobiography that reveals some interplay between life and thought. It is argued that almost all autobiographies by philosophers are philosophical because the recounting of one's own life is almost invariably a form of extended speech act of self-revelation. When a philosopher is the (...)
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  31.  25
    David Burrell & Stanley Hauerwas (1974). Self-Deception and Autobiography: Theological and Ethical Reflections on Speer's "Inside the Third Reich". Journal of Religious Ethics 2 (1):99 - 117.
    Albert Speer's life offers a paradigm of self-deception, and his autobiography serves to illustrate Fingarette's account of self-deception as a persistent failure to spell out our engagements in the world. Using both Speer and Fingarette, we show how self-deception becomes our lot as the stories we adopt to shape our lives cover up what is destructive in our activity. Had Speer not settled for the neutral label of "architect," he might have found a story substantive enough to allow him (...)
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  32.  13
    J. Bauman (2002). Memory and Imagination: Truth in Autobiography. Thesis Eleven 70 (1):26-35.
    What is the nature of the compulsion to life writing? How does the elongated project of writing a life change as it shifts moments and locales, and why do others respond so directly as readers of stories that are so specific and particular? Janina Bauman is known in English-speaking cultures for two books, Winter in the Morning and A Dream of Belonging. The first covers her girlhood in the Warsaw ghetto, and escape; the second, more fictionalized, deals with the period (...)
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  33.  52
    Amos Bertolacci (2001). From Al-Kindi to Al-Farabi: Avicenna's Progressive Knowledge of Aristotle's Metaphysics According to His Autobiography. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 11 (2):257-295.
    The autobiography witnesses a significant evolution in Avicenna's approach to Aristotle's Metaphysics during the years of his education. It clearly shows that, at a certain point of his philosophical training, Avicenna faced the entire text of the Metaphysics , was puzzled by its extent and complexity, and found in a treatise by al-Fārābī a guide for its understanding. But, albeit less perspicuously, the autobiography also suggests that this was not Avicenna's first encounter with the Metaphysics . Avicenna dealt (...)
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  34.  6
    Karl J. Weintraub (1975). Autobiography and Historical Consciousness. Critical Inquiry 1 (4):821-848.
    An autobiographic instinct may be as old as Man Writing; but only since 1800 has Western Man placed a premium on autobiography. A bibliography of all autobiographic writing prior to that time would be a small fascicule; a bibliography since 1800 a thick tome. The ground behind this simpleminded assertion of a quantitative measure cannot be explained away by easy reference to the mass literacy of the modern world or the greater ease of publishing. It is as much a (...)
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  35.  8
    Katrina Mitcheson (2013). Truth, Autobiography and Documentary: Perspectivism in Nietzsche and Herzog. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):348-366.
    The presence of interpretation according to different perspectives in art forms in which we expect the 'truth' about the subject matter, provides an opportunity to understand what truth means in the context of perspectivism, the view that there is no objective standard of truth free from any perspective against which we can measure the veracity of an account. In this article, I explore perspectival truth through Nietzsche's philosophical autobiography, Ecce Homo , and Herzog's films, particularly Little Dieter Needs to (...)
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  36.  5
    Natalie Davis (1988). Fame and Secrecy: Leon Modena's Life as an Early Modern Autobiography. History and Theory 27:103-118.
    European autobiography of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries was fed particularly by the religious exploration of the self and the desire to tell about and place oneself within the web of one's family. Jewish autobiography has behind it these same impulses, though it is more likely to be an expansion of ethical teachings appended to a will than an elaboration from an account book. It also differs from Christian autobiography in lacking a definitive conversion. Rather the life (...)
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  37.  5
    Alan Watts (1972/2007). In My Own Way: An Autobiography, 1915-1965. New World Library.
    In this new edition of his acclaimed autobiography — long out of print and rare until now — Alan Watts tracks his spiritual and philosophical evolution from a child of religious conservatives in rural England to a freewheeling spiritual teacher who challenged Westerners to defy convention and think for themselves. From early in this intellectual life, Watts shows himself to be a philosophical renegade and wide-ranging autodidact who came to Buddhism through the teachings of Christmas Humphreys and D. T. (...)
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  38.  14
    Colin McLarty (2007). Saunders Mac Lane. Saunders Mac Lane: A Mathematical Autobiography. Philosophia Mathematica 15 (3):400-404.
    We are used to seeing foundations linked to the mainstream mathematics of the late nineteenth century: the arithmetization of analysis, non-Euclidean geometry, and the rise of abstract structures in algebra. And a growing number of case studies bring a more philosophy-of-science viewpoint to the latest mathematics, as in [Carter, 2005; Corfield, 2006; Krieger, 2003; Leng, 2002]. Mac Lane's autobiography is a valuable bridge between these, recounting his experience of how the mid- and late-twentieth-century mainstream grew especially through Hilbert's school.An (...)
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  39.  2
    Paul K. Alkon (1975). Visual Rhetoric in "The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas". Critical Inquiry 1 (4):849-881.
    Past, present, and future are reversed in the reader's encounter with the illustrations selected by Gertrude Stein for her Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas.1 After the table of contents there is a table of illustrations that encourages everyone to look at the pictures before they begin reading. During that initial examination, the illustrations forecast what is to be discovered in the text. Expectations are aroused by photographs showing Gertrude Stein in front of the atelier door, rooms hung with paintings, (...)
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  40. Fred Wilson (2006). Mill's Autobiography. In Thomas Mathien & D. G. Wright (eds.), Autobiography as Philosophy: The Philosophical Uses of Self-Presentation. Routledge
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  41.  3
    Mario Telò (2010). Embodying the Tragic Father: Autobiography and Intertextuality in Aristophanes. Classical Antiquity 29 (2):278-326.
    This paper examines the role of the generation gap in Aristophanes' construction of his persona throughout Wasps, Clouds, and Peace. It contends that in Wasps and Clouds Aristophanes defines the relationship with his audience and his rivals by presenting himself as the figure of a paternal son. The same stance shapes the comic poet's generic self-positioning in the initial scene of Peace, where the parody of Euripides' Aeolus and Bellerophon evinces a corrective attitude in relation not only to the troubled (...)
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  42. Benedetto Croce & R. G. Collingwood (1928). An Autobiography. Philosophical Review 37 (3):281-282.
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  43.  1
    Emily Gowers (2003). Fragments of Autobiography in HoraceSatiresI. Classical Antiquity 22 (1):55-91.
    Horace's first book of Satires is his poetic debut, and has traditionally been read as a reliable account of the poet's coming of age and arrival in society. Recently, scholars have taken a more skeptical view of the authenticity of this account and have argued that Horace's self-portrait is generically determined, with the author invisible behind a composite of comic stereotypes. Nonetheless, this collection of casual and scattered fragments can, according to a less literal and more flexible definition of (...), be regarded as a coherent life history or self-presentation. This paper attempts to rehabilitate and expand the notion of the autobiographical in Satires I, and indeed to treat autobiography as the driving impulse of the book. Close readings of individual passages, some of them more overtly autobiographical than others, reveal striking patterns in the telling of this life-story, with special prominence given to the elements of self-preservation, socialization, and development of speech. Horace repeatedly replays various formative acts of emergence - from speechlessness, from his birthplace, from Philippi - even though these are referred to only indirectly. Critical events that are apparently underplayed in the book - Horace's official pardoning and his rebirth as a civil servant - are signaled instead by means of metaphor, displaced activity, or moral advice; they can also be found concealed beneath the trivial-seeming or circumstantial incidents Horace records from his daily life. As for the more obviously autobiographical highlights of the book - Horace's moral lessons at his father's knee or his first interview with Maecenas - these are not just isolated "moments," but can be shown to conflate an entire aspect of the poet's development, linguistic, moral, or social, in all its different stages. Other passages, apparently dealing with non-personal subjects - human behavior, the progress of civilization, Roman history, or the history of satire - can also be read as narratives of Horace's own civilizing process. (shrink)
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  44.  4
    David Boucher & Teresa Smith (eds.) (2013). R. G. Collingwood: An Autobiography and Other Writings: With Essays on Collingwood's Life and Work. OUP Oxford.
    This volume presents a many-faceted view of the great Oxford philosopher R. G. Collingwood. At its centre is his Autobiography of 1939, a cult classic for its compelling 'story of his thought'. That work is accompanied here by previously unpublished writings by Collingwood and eleven specially written essays on aspects of his life and work.
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  45. Michael Davis (1998). The Autobiography of Philosophy: Rousseau's the Reveries of the Solitary Walker. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In making the condition for its own possibility its deepest concern, philosophy is necessarily about itself—it is autobiographical. The first part of The Autobiography of Philosophy interprets Heidegger's Being and Time, Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals, Aristotle's Metaphysics, and Plato's Lysis as examples of the implicitly autobiographical character of philosophy. The second part is a reading of Rousseau's The Reveries of the Solitary Walker.
     
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  46. Raymond Lam (2008). Renewing Self-Knoweldge Through the Essayist Autobiography: Montaigne's Philosophy of Humanity in the Essays. Emergent Australasian Philosophers 1 (1).
    This paper contends that the concept of the autobiography in the essayist tradition, most prominent in the Essays of Montaigne, has the capacity to powerfully renew a philosopher’s understanding of the constantly changing self. This is possible not only due to the characteristics of Montaigne’s style such as his skepticism, his relativism, but his experience of his weaknesses and circumstances as common conditions of universal humanity. As a totality, these guide him towards a philosophical understanding of the mystery that (...)
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  47. Thomas Mathien & D. G. Wright (eds.) (2010). Autobiography as Philosophy: The Philosophical Uses of Self-Presentation. Routledge.
    Most philosophical writing is impersonal and argumentative, but many important philosophers have nevertheless written accounts of their own lives. Filling a gap in the market for a text focusing on autobiography as philosophy, this collection discusses several such autobiographies in the light of their authors' broader work, and considers whether there are any philosophical tasks for which life accounts are particularly appropriate. Instead of the common impersonal and argumentative forms of ordinary philosophical discussion, these autobiographical texts are deeply personal (...)
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  48. Thomas Mathien & D. G. Wright (eds.) (2006). Autobiography as Philosophy: The Philosophical Uses of Self-Presentation. Routledge.
    Most philosophical writing is impersonal and argumentative, but many important philosophers have nevertheless written accounts of their own lives. Filling a gap in the market for a text focusing on autobiography as philosophy, this collection discusses several such autobiographies in the light of their authors' broader work, and considers whether there are any philosophical tasks for which life accounts are particularly appropriate. Instead of the common impersonal and argumentative forms of ordinary philosophical discussion, these autobiographical texts are deeply personal (...)
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  49. William McCuaig (ed.) (2009). Not Being God: A Collaborative Autobiography. Cup.
    Gianni Vattimo, a leading philosopher of the continental school, has always resisted autobiography. But in this intimate memoir, the voice of Vattimo as thinker, political activist, and human being finds its expression on the page. With Piergiorgio Paterlini, a noted Italian writer and journalist, Vattimo reflects on a lifetime of politics, sexual radicalism, and philosophical exuberance in postwar Italy. Turin, the city where he was born and one of the intellectual capitals of Europe, forms the core of his reminiscences, (...)
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  50. William McCuaig (ed.) (2010). Not Being God: A Collaborative Autobiography. Cup.
    Gianni Vattimo, a leading philosopher of the continental school, has always resisted autobiography. But in this intimate memoir, the voice of Vattimo as thinker, political activist, and human being finds its expression on the page. With Piergiorgio Paterlini, a noted Italian writer and journalist, Vattimo reflects on a lifetime of politics, sexual radicalism, and philosophical exuberance in postwar Italy. Turin, the city where he was born and one of the intellectual capitals of Europe, forms the core of his reminiscences, (...)
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