Search results for 'Automatism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lisa Trahair (2014). Being on the Outside: Cinematic Automatism in Stanley Cavell's The World Viewed. Film-Philosophy 18 (1):128-146.score: 24.0
    Stanley Cavell's The World Viewed was the first book on cinema to attempt to provide an ontological theorisation of film that could account not only for its popular instances and the reason why they enthralled audiences for over half a century but also for the demise of its mythic function and the possibility of its redemption in serious modernist film. Inadequately understood at the time of its publication, and for too long ignored by Film Studies, Cavell's arguments about modernist cinema (...)
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  2. Hamish J. McLeod, Mitchell K. Byrne & Rachel Aitken (2004). Automatism and Dissociation: Disturbances of Consciousness and Volition From a Psychological Perspective. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 27 (5):471-487.score: 21.0
  3. Zushe Yuan (2011). The Autonomy of Cultural Practice: Basis, Limit and Significance of the Possibility of Developing “Cultural Automatism”. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):134-144.score: 21.0
    Culture has always led a problematic existence. As a result, the diagnosis and treatment of various cultural diseases continue to depend on the embarrassing double identity of culture as both patient and doctor, hence making it difficult for culture to explore its own obscure recesses. The question of whether culture is autonomous and can be itself in its own way should therefore be considered theoretically. Since culture is closely associated with civilization, real culture must be generated from the florescence of (...)
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  4. Diarmuid Costello & Dawn M. Phillips (2009). Automatism, Causality and Realism: Foundational Problems in the Philosophy of Photography. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):1-21.score: 18.0
    This article contains a survey of recent debates in the philosophy of photography, focusing on aesthetic and epistemic issues in particular. Starting from widespread notions about automatism, causality and realism in the theory of photography, the authors ask whether the prima facie tension between the epistemic and aesthetic embodied in oppositions such as automaticism and agency, causality and intentionality, realism and fictional competence is more than apparent. In this context, the article discusses recent work by Roger Scruton, Dominic Lopes, (...)
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  5. Gerald J. Erion (2001). The Cartesian Test for Automatism. Minds and Machines 11 (1):29-39.score: 15.0
    In Part V of his Discourse on the Method, Descartes introduces a test for distinguishing people from machines that is similar to the one proposed much later by Alan Turing. The Cartesian test combines two distinct elements that Keith Gunderson has labeled the language test and the action test. Though traditional interpretation holds that the action test attempts to determine whether an agent is acting upon principles, I argue that the action test is best (...)
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  6. B. Bosanquet (1899). Social Automatism and the Imitation Theory. Mind 8 (30):167-175.score: 15.0
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  7. Iraj Derakhshan (2003). The Preservation of Consciousness, Automatism, and Movement Control. Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 15 (4):456.score: 15.0
  8. C. Lloyd Morgan (1896). Animal Automatism and Consciousness. The Monist 7 (1):1-18.score: 15.0
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  9. Leonora D. Cohen (1936). Descartes and Henry More on the Beast-Machine—A Translation of Their Correspondence Pertaining to Animal Automatism. Annals of Science 1 (1):48-61.score: 15.0
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  10. Arthur Harington (1897). Animal Automatism and Consciousness. The Monist 7 (4):611-616.score: 15.0
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  11. R. Ruyer (1964). The Mystery of Reproduction and the Limits of Automatism. Diogenes 12 (48):53-69.score: 15.0
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  12. Elisabeth Boetzkes (1992). Robert F. Schopp, Automatism, Insanity, and the Psychology of Criminal Responsibility Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (4):294-296.score: 15.0
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  13. Edmund Montgomery (1893). Automatism and Spontaneity. The Monist 4 (1):44-64.score: 15.0
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  14. C. Lloyd Morgan (1897). Automatism, Determinism, and Freedom. The Monist 8 (1):148-149.score: 15.0
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  15. Todd Cronan (2007). “Primeval Automatism”. Overheard in Seville 25 (25):20-27.score: 15.0
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  16. Stewart P. Foltz (1912). Automatism. The Monist 22 (1):91-123.score: 15.0
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  17. John Grier Hibben (1895). Automatism in Morality. International Journal of Ethics 5 (4):462-471.score: 15.0
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  18. Carol Armstrong (2012). Automatism and Agency Intertwined: A Spectrum of Photographic Intentionality. Critical Inquiry 38 (4):705-726.score: 15.0
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  19. Larry Alexander (1993). Book Review:Automatism, Insanity, and the Psychology of Criminal Responsibility: A Philosophical Inquiry. Robert F. Schopp. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (3):594-.score: 15.0
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  20. Richard M. Shiffrin (1997). Attention, Automatism, and Consciousness. In Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.), Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum. 49--64.score: 15.0
  21. Diarmuid Costello (2012). Automat, Automatic, Automatism: Rosalind Krauss and Stanley Cavell on Photography and the Photographically Dependent Arts. Critical Inquiry 38 (4):819-854.score: 15.0
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  22. R. J. van Egten & W. F. Chamberlin (1959). Human Thought: New Orientation Due To Automatism. Diogenes 7 (27):82-101.score: 15.0
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  23. Robert F. Schopp (1993). [Book Review] Automatism, Insanity, and the Psychology of Criminal Responsibility, a Philosophical Inquiry. [REVIEW] Ethics 103:594-596.score: 15.0
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  24. Daniel M. Wegner (2004). Précis of the Illusion of Conscious Will. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):649-659.score: 9.0
    The experience of conscious will is the feeling that we are doing things. This feeling occurs for many things we do, conveying to us again and again the sense that we consciously cause our actions. But the feeling may not be a true reading of what is happening in our minds, brains, and bodies as our actions are produced. The feeling of conscious will can be fooled. This happens in clinical disorders such as alien hand syndrome, dissociative identity disorder, and (...)
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  25. Timothy Mooney (2011). Plasticity, Motor Intentionality and Concrete Movement in Merleau-Ponty. Continental Philosophy Review 44 (4):359-381.score: 9.0
    Merleau-Ponty’s explication of concrete or practical movement by way of the Schneider case could be read as ending up close to automatism, neglecting its flexibility and plasticity in the face of obstacles. It can be contended that he already goes off course in his explication of Schneider’s condition. Rasmus Jensen has argued that he assimilates a normal person’s motor intentionality to the patient’s, thereby generating a vacuity problem. I argue that Schneider’s difficulties with certain movements point to a means (...)
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  26. Patrick Maynard (2012). Arts, Agents, Artifacts: Photography's Automatisms. Critical Inquiry 38 (4):727-745.score: 9.0
    Recent advances in paleoarchaeology show why nothing in the Tate Modern, where a conference on "Agency & Automatism" took place, challenges the roots of 'the idea of the fine arts' (Kristeller) as high levels of craft, aesthetics, mimesis and mental expression, as exemplifying cultures: it is by them that we define our species. This paper identifies and deals with resistances, early and late, to photographic fine art as based on concerns about automatism reducing human agency--that is, mental expression--then (...)
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  27. William S. Robinson, Epiphenomenalism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 6.0
    Epiphenomenalism is the view that mental events are caused by physical events in the brain, but have no effects upon any physical events. Behavior is caused by muscles that contract upon receiving neural impulses, and neural impulses are generated by input from other neurons or from sense organs. On the epiphenomenalist view, mental events play no causal role in this process. Huxley (1874), who held the view, compared mental events to a steam whistle that contributes nothing to the work of (...)
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  28. Daniel M. Wegner (2005). Who is the Controller of Controlled Processes? In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 19-36.score: 6.0
    Are we the robots? This question surfaces often in current psychological re- search, as various kinds of robot parts-automatic actions, mental mechanisms, even neural circuits-keep appearing in our explanations of human behavior. Automatic processes seem responsible for a wide range of the things we do, a fact that may leave us feeling, if not fully robotic, at least a bit nonhuman. The complement of the automatic process in contemporary psychology, of course, is the controlled process (Atkinson & Shiffrin, 1968; Bargh, (...)
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  29. Susan Dimock (2011). What Are Intoxicated Offenders Responsible For? The “Intoxication Defense” Re-Examined. Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (1):1-20.score: 6.0
    I provide a brief history of the common law governing the criminal liability of intoxicated offenders, and the codification and application of the intoxication rules in Canada. I argue that the common law and its statutory application in Canada violate a number of principles of criminal justice. I then argue that the rules cannot be saved by attempts to subsume them under principles of prior fault. I end with a modest proposal for law reform.
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  30. Yves Rossetti (2001). Implicit Perception in Action: Short-Lived Motor Representation of Space. In Peter G. Grossenbacher (ed.), Finding Consciousness in the Brain: A Neurocognitive Approach. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins. 133-181.score: 6.0
  31. Susan Dimock (2012). Intoxication and the Act/Control/Agency Requirement. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):341-362.score: 6.0
    Doug Husak has argued, persuasively I think, that there is no literal ‘act requirement’ in Anglo-American law. I begin by reviewing Husak’s reasons for rejecting the act requirement, and provide additional reasons to think he is right to do so. But Husak’s alternative, the ‘control condition’, I argue, is inadequate. The control requirement is falsified by the widespread practice of holding extremely intoxicated offenders liable for criminal conduct they engage in even if they lack control over their conduct at the (...)
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  32. John A. Bargh (2005). Bypassing the Will: Toward Demystifying the Nonconscious Control of Social Behavior. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 37-58.score: 6.0
  33. Jack Glaser & John F. Kihlstrom (2005). Compensatory Automaticity: Unconscious Volition is Not an Oxymoron. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 171-195.score: 6.0
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  34. B. Keith Payne, Larry L. Jacoby & Alan J. Lambert (2005). Attitudes as Accessibility Bias: Dissociating Automatic and Controlled Processes. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford University Press. 393-420.score: 6.0
  35. F. Gregory Ashby, Benjamin O. Turner & Jon C. Horvitz (2010). Cortical and Basal Ganglia Contributions to Habit Learning and Automaticity. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (5):208.score: 6.0
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  36. John Beloff (1962/1965). The Existence Of Mind. McGibbon & Kee.score: 6.0
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  37. Frederique De Vignemont & Tania Singer (2006). The Empathic Brain: How, When and Why? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):435-441.score: 6.0
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  38. Michael Schreyach (2013). Pre-Objective Depth in Merleau-Ponty and Jackson Pollock. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):49-70.score: 6.0
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  39. Daniel M. Wegner (2004). Precis of the Illusion of Conscious Will (and Commentaries and Reply). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):649-659.score: 6.0
    The experience of conscious will is the feeling that we are doing things. This feeling occurs for many things we do, conveying to us again and again the sense that we consciously cause our actions. But the feeling may not be a true reading of what is happening in our minds, brains, and bodies as our actions are produced. The feeling of conscious will can be fooled. This happens in clinical disorders such as alien hand syndrome, dissociative identity disorder, and (...)
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  40. Stéphane Legrand (2004). Portraits du dégénéré en fou, en primitif, en enfant etfinalement en artiste. Methodos 3.score: 6.0
    Cet article traite du concept de « dégénérescence », importé dans la psychiatrie française par Benedict-Auguste Morel dans les années 1850, et largement diffusé par la suite, dans ce champ ainsi que dans celui de la criminologie. On tente d’analyser la reconfiguration qu’impose ce concept au savoir psychiatrique en dégageant la manière dont il permet d’intégrer en un ensemble cohérent plusieurs modèles théoriques: un paradigme neurologique, une théorie de l’automatisme morbide, un certain évolutionnisme. Sur ces bases, on essaie d’établir les (...)
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  41. Lisa Feldman Barrett, Kevin N. Ochsner & James J. Gross (2007). On the Automaticity of Emotion. In John A. Bargh (ed.), Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Frontiers of Social Psychology. Psychology Press. 173-217.score: 6.0
  42. John A. Bargh (ed.) (2007). Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Psychology Press.score: 6.0
  43. Ran R. Hassin (2005). Nonconscious Control and Implicit Working Memory. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 196-222.score: 6.0
  44. Agnes Moors & Jan De Houwer (2007). What is Automaticity? An Analysis of its Component Features and Their Interrelations. In Bargh, John A. (2007). Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Frontiers of Social Psychology. (Pp. 11-50). New York, Ny, Us: Psychology Press. X, 341 Pp.score: 6.0
     
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  45. Antti Revonsuo, Mirja Johanson, Jan-Eric Wedlund & John Chaplin (2000). The Zombies Among Us: Consciousness and Automatic Behaviour. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 6.0
     
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  46. Bianca Vaterrodt-Plünnecke, Thomas Krüger & Jürgen Bredenkamp (2002). Process-Dissociation Procedure: A Testable Model for Considering Assumptions About the Stochastic Relation Between Consciously Controlled and Automatic Processes. Experimental Psychology 49 (1):3-26.score: 6.0
     
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  47. Simon Wigley (2007). Automaticity, Consciousness and Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):209-225.score: 3.0
    Cognitive scientists have long noted that automated behavior is the rule, while consciousness acts of self-regulation are the exception to the rule. On the face of it automated actions appear to be immune to moral appraisal because they are not subject to conscious control. Conventional wisdom suggests that sleepwalking exculpates, while the mere fact that a person is performing a well-versed task unthinkingly does not. However, our apparent lack of conscious control while we are undergoing automaticity challenges the idea that (...)
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  48. Edmond L. Wright, The Defence of Qualia.score: 3.0
    In view of the excellent arguments that have been put forth recently in favour of qualia, internal sensory presentations, it would strike an impartial observer - one could imagine a future historian of philosophy - as extremely odd why so many philosophers who are opposed to qualia, that is, sensory experiences internal to the brain, have largely ignored those arguments in their own. There has been a fashionable assumption that any theory of perception which espouses qualia has long since been (...)
     
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  49. Pierre Perruchet & Annie Vinter (2002). The Self-Organizing Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):297-388.score: 3.0
    We propose that the isomorphism generally observed between the representations composing our momentary phenomenal experience and the structure of the world is the end-product of a progressive organization that emerges thanks to elementary associative processes that take our conscious representations themselves as the stuff on which they operate, a thesis that we summarize in the concept of Self-Organizing Consciousness (SOC). Key Words: Associative learning; automatism; consciousness; development; implicit learning; incubation; language; mental representation; perception; phenomenal experience.
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  50. Masao Ito (2004). How Neuroscience Accounts for the Illusion of Conscious Will. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):664-665.score: 3.0
    Wegner's monograph presents the view that conscious will is a feeling that we experience when we perform an action through a mechanistic process of the brain, rather than a mental force that causes the action. The view is supported by several lines of evidence in which conscious will is dissociated from the actual performance of voluntary movements, as in automatism. The book further extends an insightful analysis of the mental system behind the illusion of conscious will and inspires neuroscientists (...)
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