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Aviad Raz [4]Aviad E. Raz [2]
  1. Aviad Raz, Isabella Jordan & Silke Schicktanz (2012). Exploring the Positions of German and Israeli Patient Organizations in the Bioethical Context of End-of-Life Policies. Health Care Analysis (2):1-17.
    Patient organizations are increasingly involved in national and international bioethical debates and health policy deliberations. In order to examine how and to what extent cultural factors and organizational contexts influence the positions of patient organizations, this study compares the positions of German and Israeli patient organizations (POs) on issues related to end-of-life medical care. We draw on a qualitative pilot study of thirteen POs, using as a unit of analysis pairs comprised of one German PO and one Israeli PO that (...)
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  2. Silke Schicktanz & Aviad Raz (2012). Responsibility Revisited. Medicine Studies 3 (3):129-130.
    Recent developments in medicine open up new possibilities for planning and shaping life. At the same time, this scope of new options and interventions also involves new forms and spheres of responsibilities. Elderly persons can be viewed as having a responsibility toward their families and partners to plan, via advance health care directives, the final stages of their life; individuals can be seen as responsible for late onset diseases when ignoring public incitements for a healthy life style; and medical professionals (...)
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  3. Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Carmel Shalev (2010). The Cultural Context of Patient's Autonomy and Doctor's Duty: Passive Euthanasia and Advance Directives in Germany and Israel. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):363-369.
    The moral discourse surrounding end-of-life (EoL) decisions is highly complex, and a comparison of Germany and Israel can highlight the impact of cultural factors. The comparison shows interesting differences in how patient’s autonomy and doctor’s duties are morally and legally related to each other with respect to the withholding and withdrawing of medical treatment in EoL situations. Taking the statements of two national expert ethics committees on EoL in Israel and Germany (and their legal outcome) as an example of this (...)
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  4. Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Carmel Shalev (2010). The Cultural Context of End-of-Life Ethics: A Comparison of Germany and Israel. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (03):381-394.
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  5. Aviad E. Raz & Silke Schicktanz (2009). Diversity and Uniformity in Genetic Responsibility: Moral Attitudes of Patients, Relatives and Lay People in Germany and Israel. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):433-442.
    The professional and institutional responsibility for handling genetic knowledge is well discussed; less attention has been paid to how lay people and particularly people who are affected by genetic diseases perceive and frame such responsibilities. In this exploratory study we qualitatively examine the attitudes of lay people, patients and relatives of patients in Germany and Israel towards genetic testing. These attitudes are further examined in the national context of Germany and Israel, which represent opposite regulatory approaches and bioethical debates concerning (...)
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  6. Haim Hazan & Aviad E. Raz (1997). The Authorized Self: How Middle Age Defines Old Age in the Postmodern. Semiotica 113 (3-4):257-276.
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